Aerospace & Defense

  • April 04, 2024

    Stanford Lecturer Says Mideast War Talk Got Him Suspended

    A Black Muslim Stanford University lecturer said the school refused to renew his contract after he discussed the Israel-Hamas war in class and had students take part in a profiling and policing simulation, despite him being cleared of wrongdoing.

  • April 04, 2024

    Smith & Wesson Scolded At 7th Circ. For Minimizing Victims

    A Seventh Circuit judge on Thursday lambasted counsel for Smith & Wesson for stating "several" people were killed or wounded in the July Fourth shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, saying he was tempted to use up some of the company's allotted time by listing the names of all 55 victims.

  • April 04, 2024

    Huawei Slated For 2026 Sanctions, IP Theft Trial

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Thursday set the trial of China's Huawei Technologies and affiliates for 2026, over prosecutors' claims that Huawei deceived banks and the U.S. government for years about its business dealings in sanctioned countries and conspired to steal intellectual property from U.S. companies.

  • April 04, 2024

    Claims Court Backs Defense Health Agency $31M IT Deal Pick

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge denied an information technology contractor's protest of a $31 million IT deal the Defense Health Agency awarded to a competitor, saying he found nothing wrong with how the agency evaluated the contractors' proposals.

  • April 04, 2024

    BAE Stuck $8.2B Retirement Plan With Hefty Fees, Court Told

    Aerospace and defense company BAE Systems breached federal benefits law by saddling its $8.2 billion retirement plan with excessive recordkeeping fees and causing participants' savings to plummet, a proposed class action filed in D.C. federal court said.

  • April 04, 2024

    Wireless Orgs Say DOD's 3 GHz Sharing Report Is 'Incomplete'

    Wireless industry interests are calling for further study on commercial use of the 3 gigahertz band following the public release of a Department of Defense report claiming that a wide range of conditions would need to be met before the band could be opened up.

  • April 04, 2024

    Citibank Can't Force Arbitration In Fees Suit, Veterans Say

    A proposed class of military members has told the Fourth Circuit that Citibank cannot force them to arbitrate claims the bank overcharged credit card fees, arguing federal laws on military-member lending negate arbitration agreements.

  • April 04, 2024

    GAO Says Navy Awardee Ineligible Due To Registration Lapse

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has backed a protest over a nearly $5 million Navy custodial services contract, saying the awardee's attempt to re-register in a federal contractor database ahead of expiry didn't excuse a breach of a continuous registration requirement.

  • April 04, 2024

    W.Va. Plaintiff Drops Telemarketing Claim Against Fla. Firm

    A West Virginia woman who alleged in a putative class action that law firms had bombarded her and others with unwanted legal advertising phone calls has announced a joint dismissal with one of the firms involved.

  • April 04, 2024

    Trump Can't Duck Secret Doc Charges On Immunity Grounds

    The Florida federal judge overseeing the classified documents case against Donald Trump rejected his bid Thursday to dismiss the criminal indictment against him, saying the charges don't make any reference to the Presidential Records Act that the former president said grants him immunity.

  • April 04, 2024

    CNN Sues DOJ For Biden's Special Counsel Interview Tapes

    CNN has hit the U.S. Department of Justice with an open-records suit seeking all audio and video recordings of President Joe Biden's five-hour interview with special counsel Robert Hur last October, saying in D.C. federal court Thursday that they "will help the public evaluate Hur's decision not to charge Biden and to close the investigation into classified documents found at Biden's former office and private residence."

  • April 04, 2024

    Sport Aircraft Maker Icon Hits Ch. 11 With $170M Debt

    Light-sport aircraft manufacturer Icon Aircraft filed for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware bankruptcy court Thursday with more than $170 million in debt and plans for an asset sale and liquidation.

  • April 03, 2024

    US Escapes $7.5M Demand For Bomb-Sniffing K9s In Kabul

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has tossed a non-governmental organization's lawsuit seeking $7.5 million from the U.S. government for K9 bomb-sniffing work in an area of Afghanistan that housed foreign embassies, saying the government never agreed to guarantee payment.

  • April 03, 2024

    NLRB Defends Urging Calif. Court To Defy 5th Circ. In SpaceX

    The National Labor Relations Board's suggestion that a California federal court should keep a transferred constitutional challenge from SpaceX even after the Fifth Circuit reversed the transfer was an act of "zealous advocacy" for itself, the board said Wednesday, responding to urgent questions from the appeals panel.

  • April 03, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Struggles With Ambiguity In $14M Army Corps Row

    Federal Circuit judges struggled Wednesday to understand ambiguous terms in a company's contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for post-hurricane power restoration, indicating that neither party had clearly explained if the contractor has a valid $14 million claim for additional work needed.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ethiopian Air Trial Set For November Over Boeing's Objections

    An Illinois federal judge said Wednesday that some pending lawsuits over a 2019 Ethiopian Airlines crash will go to trial late this year, despite Boeing's objections that he should hold off on setting a trial date to allow for fruitful settlement negotiations.

  • April 03, 2024

    Special Counsel Tells Judge Cannon To Rule On PRA Issue

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate told U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon that she needs to rule on Trump's argument that he was authorized under the Presidential Records Act to take the documents and cannot send the question of law to the jury.

  • April 02, 2024

    DC Circ. Says FCC Must Rethink Terms For Chinese Video Ban

    The D.C. Circuit ordered the Federal Communications Commission to revise its definition of "critical infrastructure," but still upheld the agency's decision to ban the marketing and sale of video surveillance equipment from two Chinese manufacturers in a new ruling Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Want 2 Years For Culprit In Fake NASA Contracts Plot

    Prosecutors urged a Virginia federal judge to sentence a Michigan man to 25 months in prison Tuesday after he admitted to defrauding investors through fake NASA contracts, seeking a sentence lighter than the guideline range because he spent eight grueling months in a Philippines detention center before he was in U.S. custody.

  • April 02, 2024

    9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Theranos Execs' Criminal Appeals In June

    The Ninth Circuit has set oral arguments in former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' high-stakes appeal of her criminal securities fraud conviction and 11-year prison sentence for June 11 — the same day the panel is scheduled to hear arguments in convicted ex-Theranos executive Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani's appeal.

  • April 02, 2024

    Crowell & Moring Attys Avoid Bias Fault In Army Deal Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied a Virginia-based defense contractor's protest of a $192.7 million U.S. Army technical and engineering support deal but refused to fault Crowell & Moring LLP attorneys for representing the contractor despite conflict of interest allegations.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    2 Firms Seek To Lead Boeing 737 Max Safety Investor Suit

    Labaton Keller Sucharow LLP and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP have each asked a Virginia federal judge for a lead role in a securities lawsuit against Boeing over the safety of its 737 Max jets and the role Boeing's top brass allegedly played in diminishing shareholder value.

  • April 02, 2024

    USPTO Targeted In Brothers' Patent Litigation Campaign

    Two brothers who are software engineers and claim to have invented two-factor authorization are accusing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office of infringing their patents with its sign-in website.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

Expert Analysis

  • Risks Of Nonmutual Offensive Collateral Estoppel In MDLs

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    After the Supreme Court declined to review the Sixth Circuit's ruling in the E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. personal injury litigation, nonmutual offensive collateral estoppel could show up in more MDLs, and transform the loss of a single MDL bellwether trial into a de facto classwide decision that binds thousands of other MDL cases, say Chantale Fiebig and Luke Sullivan at Weil Gotshal.

  • Wesco Ch. 11 Ruling Marks Shift In Uptier Claim Treatment

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    A Texas bankruptcy court’s recent decision in In re: Wesco Aircraft Holdings leaves nonparticipating creditors with a road map to litigate to judgment non-pro rata liability management transactions, and foreshadows that bankruptcy courts may no longer be a friendly forum for these types of claims, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Takeaways From Groundbreaking Data Transfer Order

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    A recent first-of-its-kind executive order and related proposed rulemaking lay the groundwork for important outbound U.S. data protections, but they may have unintended consequences related to the types of data and the subjects within their scope, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • FARA Enforcement May Soon Be In The Halls Of Higher Ed

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    Given Congress’ increased attention to rising foreign influence on U.S. college campuses, the U.S. Department of Justice may soon turn the Foreign Agents Registration Act spotlight on educational institutions and groups, which will need to review their possible obligations under the statute, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • How The FAA Is Embracing Simplified Flight Controls

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    The Federal Aviation Administration's openness to approving simplified flight controls as part of its forthcoming refresh of regulations governing light-sport aircraft and sport pilot certificates is valuable and welcome — and the same approach can be brought to general aviation aircraft, says Paul Alp at Adams and Reese.

  • Making The Pitch For A Civil Resolution In A Criminal Case

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    Even without the depth of visibility into prosecutorial decision making offered by special counsel Robert Hur’s recently released report, defense counsel may be able to make the case for civil resolutions of criminal investigations while minimizing a potential negative response from prosecutors to such an argument, says Bill Athanas at Bradley Arant.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Practical Steps For Navigating New Sanctions On Russia

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    After the latest round of U.S. sanctions against Russia – the largest to date since the Ukraine war began – companies will need to continue to strengthen due diligence and compliance measures to navigate the related complexities, say James Min and Chelsea Ellis at Rimon.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Conflict, Latent Ambiguity, Cost Realism

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Markus Speidel at MoFo examines a trio of U.S. Government Accountability Office decisions with takeaways about the consequences of a teaming partner's organizational conflict of interest, a solicitation's latent ambiguity and an unreasonable agency cost adjustment.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Opinion

    OFAC Should Loosen Restrictions On Arbitration Services

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    The Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations should be amended so that U.S. persons can provide arbitration services to sanctioned parties — this would help align OFAC policy with broader U.S. arbitration policy, promote efficiency, and effectively address related geopolitical and regulatory challenges, says Javier Coronado Diaz at Diaz Reus.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

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