Aerospace & Defense

  • March 19, 2024

    Nippon Steel Tries To Ease Worries Over $14.9B US Steel Deal

    Nippon Steel Corp. pledged to move its North American headquarters to Pennsylvania in an attempt to assure the public that its proposed $14.9 billion acquisition of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel will ultimately be good for the domestic steel industry.

  • March 19, 2024

    High Court Won't Moot Suit Over Rescinded No-Fly Listing

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the federal government cannot moot a challenge to an individual's placement on the federal no-fly list by removing the person from the list, in the absence of a definite declaration that the government will not return them to the list in the future.

  • March 18, 2024

    Claims Court Won't Let Army Out Of Contract Breach Claims Yet

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge ruled that a clause in a U.S. Army training service deal allowed it to end a contractor's deal but said he couldn't yet rule on claims the Army breached the deal by not making full payments.

  • March 18, 2024

    GOP Rep. Calls For Crackdown On EV Threats From China

    Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., a member of the House select committee on China's Communist Party and a U.S. Senate candidate, has asked the Commerce Department to investigate the imports of electronic vehicles and their components and the possible security threats to the United States from electronics from China.

  • March 18, 2024

    Feds Call $45B Nuclear Deal Appeal Moot After New Award

    The federal government pressed the Federal Circuit to dismiss a contractor's appeal over registration issues with a $45 billion nuclear waste cleanup contract, arguing Monday the appeal was moot following the U.S. Department of Energy's reissuance of the deal.

  • March 18, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Multimillion-dollar e-cigarette settlements, $4 billion in stock buybacks and a $6.1 million appraisal tweak were among the big-dollar items logged in the Delaware Court of Chancery's ledger last week. Also on the docket: a Panama port project, a news outlet's defamation case, drone disputes and a flood of mail from Tesla shareholders. In case you missed it, here's all the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Attorney For Sen. Menendez's Wife Conflicted, Feds Say

    Nadine Menendez, the wife of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and his co-defendant in a federal corruption trial in Manhattan, may be disadvantaged at trial due to her counsel's having "personal knowledge of certain facts relevant to this matter" that could compel him to testify as a witness, federal prosecutors said.

  • March 18, 2024

    4th Circ. Preview: Airport Mishap, Inmate Pay Launch March

    The Fourth Circuit's spring session will task the court with refereeing a power struggle between Virginia regulators and the authority that runs Washington, D.C.'s airports — stemming from a workplace amputation — and delving into the "honest belief" doctrine's role in a Family Medical Leave Act case.

  • March 15, 2024

    Dems Want New Missile Plan Axed If Military Can't Justify Cost

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., suggested the Air Force's new nuclear missile program should be shuttered after it exceeded its expected cost to taxpayers by $36 billion, unless it can justify its relevance to national security.

  • March 15, 2024

    Feds' PACER Gaffe Doesn't Mean A Sure Win For Magnet Co.

    Federal prosecutors may suffer a setback in a case accusing a magnet manufacturer of sharing sensitive military data with China after accidentally publicizing the same information, but they may have an out under a regulation governing publishing in the public domain.

  • March 15, 2024

    Boeing Supplier Sued Over 737 Max Door Plug's Missing Bolts

    A new lawsuit in Washington state court over a Boeing 737 blowout that endangered an Alaska Airlines flight takes aim at Spirit AeroSystems, the manufacturer of the door plug that ruptured from the fuselage, for allegedly not installing necessary bolts and fittings.

  • March 15, 2024

    Navy Fails To Block Appeal Over Terminated HVAC Task Order

    A California construction contractor can go forward appealing the U.S. Navy's decision to terminate a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning task order after the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals shot down the Navy's contention the appeals board lacked jurisdiction.

  • March 15, 2024

    Military Subcontractor Says Partner Tried To Poach Work

    A federal subcontractor tasked with building secure facilities for the Marine Corps hit its own subcontractor with a $7 million lawsuit on Friday, accusing its former partner of deliberately undermining that construction work, in an effort to "steal" related contracts.

  • March 15, 2024

    Contractor's Single Claim For 2 Lost Trucks Enough, For Now

    A contractor didn't need to separate the value of two trucks lost by the U.S. Army to get the military to pay for replacement vehicles, an appeals board said, rejecting the Army's arguments that the contractor should have filed two claims.

  • March 14, 2024

    Fox News Accused Of Lying About Ukrainian Reporter's Death

    The parents of a Ukrainian journalist who died while reporting on Russia's invasion of her homeland sued Fox News on Thursday in New York state court, saying the network is trying to conceal its responsibility for the death of their daughter and shifting blame to a security adviser.

  • March 14, 2024

    3D-Gun Info Group Loses Suit Over Publishing Blueprints

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims tossed an open-source gun group's lawsuit alleging the federal government failed to follow a 2018 settlement allowing the group to publish firearm blueprints, rejecting the group's contention that dismissing a final claim would be unfair.

  • March 14, 2024

    Trump Can't Duck Classified Doc Charges Over Vagueness

    The Florida federal judge overseeing the criminal prosecution of former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate denied his bid Thursday to toss the indictment based on the "unconstitutional vagueness" of the Espionage Act, opting instead to punt the issue to later in the case.

  • March 14, 2024

    Axon, Cities Fight Over Producing Material From FTC Case

    Axon Enterprise is sparring with municipalities accusing the police equipment maker of monopolizing the Taser and body camera markets, with the local governments pushing for what Axon described as the "premature and improper" production of discovery from the Federal Trade Commission's since-abandoned case.

  • March 14, 2024

    Chancery Sends Drone-Maker's Claim To Sister Court

    A Delaware vice chancellor handed off to a regular civil court Thursday remaining claims in drone-maker Teal Drones Inc.'s suit accusing a software supplier and its owner of wrongly pulling the plug on Teal's license for autonomous-flight programming, after tossing claims against the supplier itself.

  • March 14, 2024

    DOD Contractors Raise Double Jeopardy Issues With Retrial

    Two defense contractors asked a New Mexico federal court to bar prosecutors' evidence purportedly relating to a charge of conspiring to win small business contracts, saying the evidence actually relates to fraud charges for which they were already acquitted.

  • March 14, 2024

    Bipartisan Senate Duo Releases 'Middle Ground' FISA Bill

    A bipartisan pair of senators introduced what they deem a "compromise" bill on Thursday to reauthorize and reform the controversial warrantless foreign surveillance law ahead of the April deadline to renew it.

  • March 14, 2024

    Bechtel Missed Subcontractor Targets On Nuke Waste Project

    Bechtel National Inc. failed its subcontracting obligations while building a federal nuclear waste plant at the Hanford site in Washington state, lapses that cost businesses up to $700 million in missed opportunities, according to a watchdog agency report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Army Camp Beats Worker's Claim Over Bullying Commandant

    An employment tribunal in Liverpool has tossed a claim by a former U.K. armed forces training camp employee that he was forced to quit because the camp botched a probe into repeated bullying by the camp commandant.

  • March 14, 2024

    Sen. Menendez Loses Bid To Nix Corruption Charges

    A New York federal judge on Thursday rejected U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez's bid to dismiss his bribery case, ruling none of the government's allegations target actions that could be considered protected activity under the U.S. Constitution.

  • March 14, 2024

    Mnuchin Says He's Forming Investor Group To Buy TikTok

    Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday he is forming an investor group to buy TikTok, one day after a measure to separate the social media platform from its Chinese owners passed the House.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Must Put Officers On Alert

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    Recent government actions against FTX and other crypto companies have put a laser focus on corporate compliance failures, with added pressure on compliance officers — making the need for personal risk assessment particularly acute given today's novel anti-money laundering issues, say Poppy Alexander at Constantine Cannon and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • What To Know About FCA Cybersecurity Enforcement

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    Now is a good time for practitioners, government contractors and potential relators to review recent developments in cybersecurity-related False Claims Act enforcement, and consider best practices for navigating this space in the new year, say Ellen London at London & Stout, and Li Yu and Molly Knobler at DiCello Levitt.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Africa

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    While South Africa has yet to mandate the reporting of nonfinancial and environmental, social, and corporate governance issues, policy documents and recent legislative developments are likely to have a material impact in the country's transition to a low-carbon economy and in meeting its international obligations, say Glynn Kent at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • What May Define Contract Disputes Act Jurisdiction In 2024

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    Now is a good time to reflect on how several recent decisions may have limited the government's ability to weaponize jurisdictional prerequisites under the Contract Disputes Act, and how this new direction may affect government contractors and practitioners filing CDA appeals in 2024, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • The Year Ahead In Foreign Investment And National Security

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    In 2024, expect the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, already at the forefront of addressing national security threats, to increase monitoring and enforcement related to outbound investment, focus on supply chain resilience in nondefense sectors, and heighten oversight of agricultural transactions, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • The Space Law And Policy Outlook For 2024

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    Expect significant movement in space law, regulation and policy in 2024, as Congress, the administration and independent federal agencies like the Federal Communications Commission address the increasingly congested, contested and competitive nature of space and the space industry, say Paul Stimers and Leighton Brown at Holland & Knight.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Inside Higher Education's New FCA Liability Challenges

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    As the educational sector expands its use of government funding, schools are at increased risk under the False Claims Act, but recent settlements offer valuable lessons about new theories of liability they may face and specific procedures to reduce their exposure, say James Zelenay and Jeremy Ochsenbein at Gibson Dunn.

  • AI Executive Order's Life Science, Healthcare Industry Effects

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    The recent White House executive order to manage risks associated with artificial intelligence includes provisions specific to healthcare and life sciences that merit special attention, including transparency, human oversight of AI output, and real world performance monitoring, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

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