Commercial Litigation UK

  • April 11, 2024

    NHS Assistant With Lung Condition Wins COVID Bias Claim

    An NHS trust in England forced a hospital worker with a chronic lung condition to quit her job by refusing to let her work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 11, 2024

    ECHR Climate Ruling Provides Blueprint For Future Litigation

    A ruling from Europe's top human rights court that countries have obligations to protect their citizens from climate change could serve as a blueprint for other litigation brought by activists seeking to force action from governments and corporations over a warming planet.

  • April 11, 2024

    Failure To Address Group Chat Jokes Pushed Worker To Quit

    Blackpool Council forced an employee to resign after it failed to formally investigate her complaints about a "deluge" of inappropriate WhatsApp group messages that made her view the workplace as hostile, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 11, 2024

    Dough-Maker Loses Fight Against Order To Reverse Merger

    Dough maker Cérélia on Thursday lost its fight to avoid being forced to sell its Jus-Rol brand, with a London appeals court upholding a decision that the sale is necessary to protect retailers and shoppers from paying higher prices.

  • April 11, 2024

    Hendrix Bandmates Have No Claim To Copyright, Sony Says

    The U.K. arm of Sony has hit back at the estates of the former bandmates of Jimi Hendrix in their ongoing copyright feud over the group's back catalog, alleging that the pair consented to producers taking control.

  • April 11, 2024

    Solicitor Struck Off For Misleading Client Over PI Claim

    A former Slater and Gordon personal injury lawyer who admitted that he misled a client about the status of her claim for more than 15 years was struck off by a tribunal on Thursday.

  • April 10, 2024

    No Merit To Autonomy Whistleblower Claims, Auditor Says

    A Deloitte partner testifying in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch and finance director Stephen Chamberlain duped HP into buying the British tech company for $11.7 billion said Wednesday that auditors concluded that whistleblower allegations by a finance department executive were meritless.

  • April 10, 2024

    Spain To Face Claim Over Nixed Uranium Processing Plant

    Clean energy company Berkeley Energia Ltd. on Wednesday said it has retained Herbert Smith Freehills and the Spanish firm LCS Abogados to file an investor-state claim on its behalf against Spain after the country shut down its bid to construct a uranium processing plant in 2021.

  • April 10, 2024

    Lights Out For Solar Panel Company's Battle To Revive Design

    Singapore-based solar panel maker Maxeon Solar Pte. Ltd. lost its fight to revive its invalidated panel design Wednesday, with a European Union court ruling that the appearance of its device "lacked individual character."

  • April 10, 2024

    Former Judge Says Post Office Prosecutions Made No Sense

    A former senior judge who oversaw a mediation scheme between the Post Office and people it wrongly prosecuted based on faulty IT data said the organization's case "didn't make sense," as he gave evidence to the inquiry into the scandal on Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    Medical Device Maker Bids To Stop Rival Selling Product

    A Chinese medical device maker urged a London court Wednesday to prevent a U.K. rival from selling its product until the end of its patent infringement claim, arguing that the medical device supplier might undercut its prices.

  • April 10, 2024

    Italian Airline Chairman Sued For €50M Over Joint Venture

    The chairman of Aeroitalia SRL has allegedly blocked aviation magnate German Efromovich from controlling the startup Italian airline by refusing to hand over his majority stake in the project, according to a new London claim seeking €50 million ($54 million).

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Footballer Sues HSBC For £2M Loan Negligence

    Former professional soccer player Matthew Jansen has claimed HSBC lost him almost £2 million ($2.5 million) during the 2008 financial crisis by allegedly failing to monitor the risk of loans secured against properties.

  • April 10, 2024

    EU Court Revives German Kitchen Biz's 'MH Cuisines' TM Hopes

    A German kitchen specialist can proceed to registering its "MH Cuisines" trademark after persuading a European Union court on Wednesday to overturn an earlier ruling that consumers could confuse the sign with a rival's "MM Cuisines" logo.

  • April 10, 2024

    Author 'Blacklisted' For Anti-Trans Views Loses Status Appeal

    An author whose contract was canceled after she expressed anti-transgender views online cannot revive her discrimination case, as an appeals court dismissed her claim that she was legally employed by her publisher.

  • April 10, 2024

    Door Handle Maker Grips Design Victory On Appeal

    A Czech manufacturer won its appeal Wednesday to reinstate design protections for a door handle after a European court ruled that differences in the angles of the grip and neck were significant enough to merit protection.

  • April 10, 2024

    EUIPO Wrongly Skimmed Dairy Biz's 'Rebell' TM, Court Says

    A European Union court has restored a dairy company's "Rebell" protection, ruling on Wednesday that intellectual property officials failed to explain why they narrowed the scope of the trademark for lack of use amid a beef company's protests.

  • April 10, 2024

    Chelsea FC Unfairly Booted Staffer Amid Assault 'Cover-Up'

    Chelsea Football Club unfairly fired a groundsman after he appeared to send 1,600 anonymous emails claiming the club covered up a colleague's alleged assault of the groundsman, a tribunal has held, but it declined to award him damages after ruling he was behind the emails.

  • April 10, 2024

    EU Bank Rescue Agency Overcharged Institutions By €3.7B

    A European Union court ruled Wednesday that the eurozone's rescue agency for financial institutions overcharged for contributions to its safety net fund by almost €3.7 billion ($4 billion) but has given the authority at least six months until it has to repay.

  • April 09, 2024

    'You're Going To Lose These People,' Judge Tells Lynch Atty

    U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on Tuesday chided a Steptoe partner representing former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch in his criminal fraud jury trial, saying that his hourslong questioning of a Deloitte partner shouldn't go on much longer, or "you're going to lose these people."

  • April 09, 2024

    UK Court Affirms Sweet VAT Ruling For Jumbo Marshmallows

    Jumbo-size marshmallows are not candy like regular marshmallows because they're meant to be roasted, so they qualify for a value-added tax exemption for food, the U.K. Upper Tribunal ruled in upholding a lower court's findings.

  • April 09, 2024

    BCLP Says It Had No Obligation To Man's Family In Tax Fight

    Global law firm Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner was under contract to represent only a family's patriarch and thus shouldn't be liable for taxes resulting from advising him to transfer £242 million ($307 million) in assets to his wife, then to his sons, the firm told a London court.

  • April 09, 2024

    Tory Donor Wins First Defamation Fight Against BBC

    Telecoms magnate and Conservative Party donor Mohamed Amersi won the first hurdle in his defamation battle against the BBC on Tuesday when the High Court ruled that BBC reports suggested to the public there were strong grounds to suspect that he had been involved in corruption and bribery scandals.

  • April 09, 2024

    NHS Failed In Adjusting Schedule For Nurse With Crohn's

    Scotland's phone healthcare service has been ordered by a Glasgow tribunal to pay £22,277 in compensation to a nurse for failing to make reasonable adjustments for her Crohn's disease by allowing her to work only night shifts.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Employee Says Post Office Fought Exoneration Efforts

    A former subpostmaster who led a fight to exonerate innocent people prosecuted by the Post Office and wrongly convicted of fraud, theft and false accounting — based on faulty IT data — said the organization was determined to "protect the brand at all costs," as the inquiry into the scandal resumed Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Prompt Engineering Skills Are Changing The Legal Profession

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    With a focus on higher-value work as repetitive tasks are delegated to artificial intelligence, legal roles are set to become more inspiring, and lawyers need not fear the rising demand for prompt engineers that is altering the technology-enabled legal environment, say Eric Crawley, Shah Karim and Paul O’Hagan at Epiq Legal.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • Why EU Ruling On Beneficial Ownership May Affect The UK

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    Following the EU judgment in Sovim v. Luxembourg that public access to beneficial ownership information conflicts with data protection rights, several British overseas territories and dependencies have recently reversed their commitment to introduce unrestricted access, and challenges to the U.K.’s liberal stance may be on the cards, says Rupert Cullen at Allectus Law.

  • Opinion

    Labour Should Reconsider Its Discrimination Law Plans

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    While the Labour Party's recent proposals allowing equal pay claims based on ethnicity and disability, and introducing dual discrimination, have laudable intentions and bring some advantages, they are not the right path forward as the changes complicate the discrimination claim process for employees, say Colin Leckey and Tarun Tawakley at Lewis Silkin.

  • AI Is Outpacing IP Law Frameworks

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    In Thaler v. Comptroller-General, the U.K. Supreme Court recently ruled that artificial intelligence can't be an inventor, but the discussion on the relationship between AI and intellectual property law is far from over, and it's clear that technology is developing faster than the legal framework, says Stephen Carter at The Intellectual Property Works.

  • Tracing The History Of LGBTQ+ Rights In The Workplace

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    Pride History month is a timely reminder of how recent developments have shaped LGBTQ+ employees' rights in the workplace today, and what employers can do to ensure that employees are protected from discrimination, including creating safe workplace cultures and promoting allyship, say Caitlin Farrar and Jessica Bennett at Farrer.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

  • Pension Scheme Ruling Elucidates Conversion Issues

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    In Newell Trustees v. Newell Rubbermaid UK Services, the High Court recently upheld a pension plan's conversion of final salary benefits to money purchase benefits, a welcome conclusion that considered several notable issues, such as how to construe pension deeds and when contracts made outside scheme rules can determine benefits, say Ian Gordon and Jamie Barnett at Gowling.

  • New Fraud Prevention Offense May Not Make Much Difference

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    By targeting only large organizations, the Economic Crime Act's new failure to prevent fraud offense is striking in that, despite its breadth, it will affect so few companies, and is therefore unlikely to help ordinary victims, says Andrew Smith at Corker Binning.

  • Aldi Design Infringement Case Highlights Assessment Issues

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    The forthcoming English Court of Appeal decision in Marks and Spencer v. Aldi, regarding the alleged infringement of design rights, could provide practitioners with new guidance, particularly in relation to the relevant date for assessment of infringement and the weight that should be attributed to certain design elements in making this assessment, say Rory Graham and Georgia Davis at RPC.

  • Generative AI Raises IP, Data Protection And Contracts Issues

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    As the EU's recent agreement on the Artificial Intelligence Act has fueled businesses' interest in adopting generative AI tools, it is crucial to understand how these tools utilize material to generate output and what questions to ask in relation to intellectual property, data privacy and contracts, say lawyers at Deloitte Legal.

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