Connecticut

  • April 01, 2024

    AIG Unit Can't Toss Conn. Utility's $3M Defense Cost Bid

    An AIG unit can't escape the Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative's third-party suit seeking to recoup $3 million in legal expenses, a Connecticut federal court ruled, saying the cooperative has standing to pursue coverage on behalf of its former CEO who was convicted of stealing public funds.

  • April 01, 2024

    One Set Of Amazon Buyers Can't Cancel Later Antitrust Case

    Antitrust lawsuits against Amazon.com in New York and Washington federal court will remain separate after a New York federal judge refused Friday to let online shoppers in the earlier-filed Washington case intervene in — and junk — the other proposed class action filed two years later.

  • April 01, 2024

    Cigna Can't Escape Patients' ERISA Fight Over Claim Rates

    A Connecticut federal judge agreed to trim a federal benefits lawsuit against Cigna alleging the company underpaid claims from providers who indirectly contracted with the insurer, finding allegations from participants in employer-sponsored health plans could proceed to discovery but that several medical associations lacked standing to sue.

  • April 01, 2024

    Inside The Global Ch. 11 Hunt For Ho Wan Kwok's Money

    Chasing the assets of controversial businessman Ho Wan Kwok across dozens of jurisdictions worldwide isn't an impossible mission for the seasoned Chapter 11 trustee pursuing hundreds of clawback claims, but experts predict a formidable task awaits the Paul Hastings LLP partner thanks to a potentially hostile reception in foreign courts.

  • April 01, 2024

    Aramark Accuses Aetna Of 'Gamesmanship' In Benefits Fight

    Aramark said Aetna sued it over an arbitration pact in Connecticut as a tactical response to Aramark's Texas suit claiming the insurer cost it millions by approving shoddy health benefit claims, and urged a federal judge to ship Aetna's suit to Texas as well.

  • April 01, 2024

    Canadian Trucking Co. Seeks US Bankruptcy Recognition

    Canadian truck dealers the Pride Group on Monday asked a Delaware judge for U.S. recognition of the Canadian insolvency proceedings it began in the face of a more than $90 million claim from Mitsubishi over an alleged loan default.

  • March 29, 2024

    HJ Sims Honoring Books And Records Settlement, Court Told

    The daughter of a seven-decade employee of Herbert J. Sims & Co. Inc. has withdrawn a books and records suit against the investment bank and its owner, The Teksys Corp., telling a Connecticut state court that she is now satisfied that the defendants have abided by the terms of a November settlement.

  • March 29, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Insurer In Sanitizer Ad Injury Coverage Suit

    An insurer doesn't owe coverage to a company accused of falsely advertising that its sanitizing products were effective in disinfecting surfaces, the Second Circuit ruled Friday, affirming a lower court's decision that the underlying class action can't be "reasonably construed" to substantially allege a claim of disparagement.

  • March 29, 2024

    Conn. Surgeon Left Blade In Patient For 5 Years, Suit Says

    A surgeon with Connecticut Orthopaedics lost a scalpel blade during an operation in 2018 and tried to cover his tracks when X-rays revealed it had been sewn into the patient's shoulder, a federal lawsuit alleges.

  • March 29, 2024

    Epiq Says Chubb Owes Costs In Clergy Abuse Data Leak Case

    Epiq Corporate Restructuring LLC has sued Chubb-affiliated insurers in Connecticut federal court seeking to be reimbursed for $2.5 million in settlement costs and roughly $1.8 million for its defense of litigation over Epiq's disclosure of sex abuse survivors' names in a Chapter 11 case.

  • March 29, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Conn. Atty's Suit Over Gun Ban In Parks

    The Second Circuit has revived the lawsuit of a Connecticut attorney challenging the state's ban on firearms in state parks, finding that the state did not meet its burden to show it didn't intend to enforce the law.

  • March 28, 2024

    Red Roof Inns Must Face Ohio Sex Trafficking Suits

    Red Roof Inns Inc. can't escape nine lawsuits over its purported role in sex trafficking, an Ohio federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the anonymous victims met pleading standards to allege the hotel chain knowingly made money through their victimization.

  • March 28, 2024

    Foxwoods Tribal Owner Loses $76M COVID Insurance Appeal

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, which owns and operates the Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut, did not meet a key burden when suing its insurer for more than $76 million in losses tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, the state's intermediate-level appeals court ruled Thursday in declining to revive the litigation.

  • March 28, 2024

    Texas Airbnb Host Says Suit Over Fatal Blast In Wrong Venue

    The Texas owner of an Airbnb rental unit in Jamaica where a gas stove exploded, causing fatal injuries to a Connecticut woman, says she cannot be sued where the victim lived, arguing that she never targeted the online listing for the property to anyone in Connecticut and that the federal court there lacks jurisdiction over her as a resident of Texas.

  • March 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Let Cigna Patients Appeal Class Cert. Denial

    The Ninth Circuit won't let a group of Cigna plan participants immediately appeal a trial court's rejection of class status in their lawsuit accusing the insurance giant of unlawfully colluding with its billing contractor to underpay out-of-network claims for mental health treatments.

  • March 28, 2024

    Legal Acumen Helped Lieberman In Senate, Colleagues Say

    While Joe Lieberman was best known for his political career, where he ran for vice president, supported the Iraq war and cast the deciding vote approving the Affordable Care Act, those who knew him as a practicing attorney recalled his integrity, kindness and respect for the legal process.

  • March 28, 2024

    McCarter & English Wins Extra $1.8M In Client Billing Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has found that McCarter & English LLP is entitled to another $1.8 million on top of the $1.85 million it has already been granted as a prejudgment remedy in a contract dispute, saying the former client on the hook for the award must also disclose assets under oath that could support the total $3.65 million award.

  • March 28, 2024

    Judge Nixes Aviation Atty's Defamation Suit Against Blogger

    A Connecticut federal judge has permanently dismissed a defamation suit brought by an aviation attorney against a Connecticut-based blogger and journalist, stating the claims are barred by the state's statutes of limitations and cannot be saved by equitable tolling arguments based on federal law.

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge Agrees To Training For 'Overly Harsh' Workplace

    The Judicial Council for the Second Circuit has declined to review the dismissal of a law clerk's complaint against a federal judge, who acknowledged the clerk's claims of their "overly harsh" management style and agreed to participate in workplace conduct counseling and training.

  • March 27, 2024

    Vrbo Host Is Breaking Zoning Regs, Conn. High Court Told

    Some justices of the Connecticut Supreme Court signaled on Wednesday that a lower court may have failed to provide a workable definition of the word "residence" when deciding that a Branford-based zoning board's regulations allowed short-term rentals through services like Vrbo and Airbnb.

  • March 27, 2024

    Ruger Beats Some Claims Over Online Shop Data Breach

    A Connecticut federal judge trimmed a data breach lawsuit Wednesday against gunmaker Sturm Ruger & Co. Inc. but did not fully dismiss the case, agreeing that a proposed class of plaintiffs had standing to press a breach of contract claim against the company, but the judge tossed accusations of negligence and unjust enrichment.

  • March 27, 2024

    Boston Strikes Novel Deal To Contract For Offshore Wind

    Boston Mayor Michelle Wu on Wednesday announced a novel deal between the city and energy company Avangrid Inc. to purchase up to 15 megawatts of wind-generated electricity from the company, contingent on Avangrid winning a multistate bidding process for new offshore development.

  • March 27, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NY Law Clerk's Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit Wednesday agreed with a New York federal district court's dismissal of a suit brought by a former New York law clerk accusing the state's judicial system of covering for a judge she says sexually harassed her, holding that it lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

  • March 26, 2024

    Conn. Fertility Doctor Says Law Doesn't Support Distress Claim

    A retired fertility doctor facing a lawsuit for allegedly impregnating a patient with his own sperm wants a Connecticut state court judge to dismiss a claim for negligent infliction of emotional distress, arguing that the accusation amounts to medical malpractice and the plaintiff failed to clear a mandatory procedural hurdle.

  • March 26, 2024

    Mitsubishi Seeks $88.9M From Canadian Truck Sellers In US

    Mitsubishi's commercial financing arm has asked federal judges in Connecticut, Illinois and New York to issue at least $89 million in judgments against two individuals in Canada, saying the men in question breached promises to stand behind credit lines extended to two companies that sell tractor trailers and lease equipment.

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Cases, Issues That May Shape The Intersection Of AI And IP

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    Courts dealing with the current, and likely growing, onslaught of intellectual property litigation concerning artificial intelligence will determine whether certain common forms of AI training constitute IP violations, while the government works to determine whether AI-generated output is itself protectable under the law, say Robert Hill and Kathryn Keating at Holland & Knight and Meghan Ryan at Southern Methodist University.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • What To Know About Calif.'s Cybersecurity Draft Regulations

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    If adopted, California’s recently proposed privacy regulations would require businesses already subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act to conduct new, independent audits of their cybersecurity programs, which could have a sweeping effect on companies operating in the state, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • State Privacy Laws: Not As Comprehensive As You May Think

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    As more U.S. states enact privacy laws, companies must be aware that these laws vary in scope and content, meaning organizations should take a stringent approach to compliance by considering notice, choice and data security obligations, among other requirements, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • Avoid Telehealth Pitfalls In A Post-Pandemic Environment

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    As federal and state governments roll out various changes to regulation of telehealth services, health practitioners should remain vigilant and ensure that necessary professional standards — such as proper note-taking and documentation — are not neglected in a remote environment, say attorneys at Kaufman Borgeest.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • FCRA Legislation To Watch For The Remainder Of 2023

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    If enacted, pending federal and state legislation may result in significant changes for the Fair Credit Reporting Act landscape and thus require regulated entities and practitioners to pivot their compliance strategies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

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