Connecticut

  • April 01, 2024

    Warner Bros. Directors Resign Amid DOJ Antitrust Concerns

    A pair of Warner Bros. Discovery directors have resigned from the board of directors after the U.S. Department of Justice flagged potential antitrust concerns over them sitting on both the Warner Bros. board as well as the board of Charter Communications, the agency announced Monday.

  • April 01, 2024

    Loophole Ties Conn. Firm To Home Sale Row, Judge Told

    A narrow exception to Connecticut's unfair trade practices law means an estate lawyer can be sued over how his firm handled money after the seller of a Vermont home suddenly died and his significant other was left in the lurch, an attorney for the girlfriend told a Connecticut judge on Monday.

  • April 01, 2024

    Shell Ordered To Hand Over Docs In Conn. Climate Dispute

    Shell Oil Co. must hand over several documents by the end of April in litigation concerning the company's alleged failure to take into account climate change risks at a fuel storage facility in New Haven, Connecticut, a federal magistrate judge has ruled in an attempt to end the parties' long-running discovery dispute.

  • April 01, 2024

    Conn. Condo Owners OK To Litigate Foundation Repair Claims

    The estates of two deceased homeowners can pursue contract claims against a condominium board in consolidated litigation targeting issues with the units' foundations, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Monday, finding the contract-based allegations in the complaints were timely filed.

  • April 01, 2024

    AIG Unit Can't Toss Conn. Utility's $3M Defense Cost Bid

    An AIG unit can't escape the Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative's third-party suit seeking to recoup $3 million in legal expenses, a Connecticut federal court ruled, saying the cooperative has standing to pursue coverage on behalf of its former CEO who was convicted of stealing public funds.

  • April 01, 2024

    One Set Of Amazon Buyers Can't Cancel Later Antitrust Case

    Antitrust lawsuits against Amazon.com in New York and Washington federal court will remain separate after a New York federal judge refused Friday to let online shoppers in the earlier-filed Washington case intervene in — and junk — the other proposed class action filed two years later.

  • April 01, 2024

    Cigna Can't Escape Patients' ERISA Fight Over Claim Rates

    A Connecticut federal judge agreed to trim a federal benefits lawsuit against Cigna alleging the company underpaid claims from providers who indirectly contracted with the insurer, finding allegations from participants in employer-sponsored health plans could proceed to discovery but that several medical associations lacked standing to sue.

  • April 01, 2024

    Inside The Global Ch. 11 Hunt For Ho Wan Kwok's Money

    Chasing the assets of controversial businessman Ho Wan Kwok across dozens of jurisdictions worldwide isn't an impossible mission for the seasoned Chapter 11 trustee pursuing hundreds of clawback claims, but experts predict a formidable task awaits the Paul Hastings LLP partner thanks to a potentially hostile reception in foreign courts.

  • April 01, 2024

    Aramark Accuses Aetna Of 'Gamesmanship' In Benefits Fight

    Aramark said Aetna sued it over an arbitration pact in Connecticut as a tactical response to Aramark's Texas suit claiming the insurer cost it millions by approving shoddy health benefit claims, and urged a federal judge to ship Aetna's suit to Texas as well.

  • April 01, 2024

    Canadian Trucking Co. Seeks US Bankruptcy Recognition

    Canadian truck dealers the Pride Group on Monday asked a Delaware judge for U.S. recognition of the Canadian insolvency proceedings it began in the face of a more than $90 million claim from Mitsubishi over an alleged loan default.

  • March 29, 2024

    HJ Sims Honoring Books And Records Settlement, Court Told

    The daughter of a seven-decade employee of Herbert J. Sims & Co. Inc. has withdrawn a books and records suit against the investment bank and its owner, The Teksys Corp., telling a Connecticut state court that she is now satisfied that the defendants have abided by the terms of a November settlement.

  • March 29, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Insurer In Sanitizer Ad Injury Coverage Suit

    An insurer doesn't owe coverage to a company accused of falsely advertising that its sanitizing products were effective in disinfecting surfaces, the Second Circuit ruled Friday, affirming a lower court's decision that the underlying class action can't be "reasonably construed" to substantially allege a claim of disparagement.

  • March 29, 2024

    Conn. Surgeon Left Blade In Patient For 5 Years, Suit Says

    A surgeon with Connecticut Orthopaedics lost a scalpel blade during an operation in 2018 and tried to cover his tracks when X-rays revealed it had been sewn into the patient's shoulder, a federal lawsuit alleges.

  • March 29, 2024

    Epiq Says Chubb Owes Costs In Clergy Abuse Data Leak Case

    Epiq Corporate Restructuring LLC has sued Chubb-affiliated insurers in Connecticut federal court seeking to be reimbursed for $2.5 million in settlement costs and roughly $1.8 million for its defense of litigation over Epiq's disclosure of sex abuse survivors' names in a Chapter 11 case.

  • March 29, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Conn. Atty's Suit Over Gun Ban In Parks

    The Second Circuit has revived the lawsuit of a Connecticut attorney challenging the state's ban on firearms in state parks, finding that the state did not meet its burden to show it didn't intend to enforce the law.

  • March 28, 2024

    Red Roof Inns Must Face Ohio Sex Trafficking Suits

    Red Roof Inns Inc. can't escape nine lawsuits over its purported role in sex trafficking, an Ohio federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the anonymous victims met pleading standards to allege the hotel chain knowingly made money through their victimization.

  • March 28, 2024

    Foxwoods Tribal Owner Loses $76M COVID Insurance Appeal

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, which owns and operates the Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut, did not meet a key burden when suing its insurer for more than $76 million in losses tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, the state's intermediate-level appeals court ruled Thursday in declining to revive the litigation.

  • March 28, 2024

    Texas Airbnb Host Says Suit Over Fatal Blast In Wrong Venue

    The Texas owner of an Airbnb rental unit in Jamaica where a gas stove exploded, causing fatal injuries to a Connecticut woman, says she cannot be sued where the victim lived, arguing that she never targeted the online listing for the property to anyone in Connecticut and that the federal court there lacks jurisdiction over her as a resident of Texas.

  • March 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Let Cigna Patients Appeal Class Cert. Denial

    The Ninth Circuit won't let a group of Cigna plan participants immediately appeal a trial court's rejection of class status in their lawsuit accusing the insurance giant of unlawfully colluding with its billing contractor to underpay out-of-network claims for mental health treatments.

  • March 28, 2024

    Legal Acumen Helped Lieberman In Senate, Colleagues Say

    While Joe Lieberman was best known for his political career, where he ran for vice president, supported the Iraq war and cast the deciding vote approving the Affordable Care Act, those who knew him as a practicing attorney recalled his integrity, kindness and respect for the legal process.

  • March 28, 2024

    McCarter & English Wins Extra $1.8M In Client Billing Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has found that McCarter & English LLP is entitled to another $1.8 million on top of the $1.85 million it has already been granted as a prejudgment remedy in a contract dispute, saying the former client on the hook for the award must also disclose assets under oath that could support the total $3.65 million award.

  • March 28, 2024

    Judge Nixes Aviation Atty's Defamation Suit Against Blogger

    A Connecticut federal judge has permanently dismissed a defamation suit brought by an aviation attorney against a Connecticut-based blogger and journalist, stating the claims are barred by the state's statutes of limitations and cannot be saved by equitable tolling arguments based on federal law.

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge Agrees To Training For 'Overly Harsh' Workplace

    The Judicial Council for the Second Circuit has declined to review the dismissal of a law clerk's complaint against a federal judge, who acknowledged the clerk's claims of their "overly harsh" management style and agreed to participate in workplace conduct counseling and training.

  • March 27, 2024

    Vrbo Host Is Breaking Zoning Regs, Conn. High Court Told

    Some justices of the Connecticut Supreme Court signaled on Wednesday that a lower court may have failed to provide a workable definition of the word "residence" when deciding that a Branford-based zoning board's regulations allowed short-term rentals through services like Vrbo and Airbnb.

  • March 27, 2024

    Ruger Beats Some Claims Over Online Shop Data Breach

    A Connecticut federal judge trimmed a data breach lawsuit Wednesday against gunmaker Sturm Ruger & Co. Inc. but did not fully dismiss the case, agreeing that a proposed class of plaintiffs had standing to press a breach of contract claim against the company, but the judge tossed accusations of negligence and unjust enrichment.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

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