Connecticut

  • March 19, 2024

    Consumers Rip Nestle's Latest Early Win Bid In False-Ad Suit

    A proposed class of bottled water drinkers have torn into Nestle Waters North America Inc.'s third attempt to shut down their claims that the company's Poland Spring brand water is deceptively marketed because it is not actually spring water, arguing Nestle's early win bid "strains or ignores a mountain of evidence."

  • March 18, 2024

    Vidal Tells PTAB To Try Defining 'Biometric Signal' Again

    The head of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has thrown out decisions from the Patent Trial and Trademark Board that found Assa Abloy was unable to show two biometric patents were unpatentable, saying the PTAB used a definition of a critical term that wasn't proposed by Assa Abloy or the patent owner.

  • March 18, 2024

    Conn. Pharmacy, FDA Say They've Settled Suit Over Probe

    Medication compounding firm SCA Pharmaceuticals and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration together have asked a Connecticut federal judge to dissolve an emergency temporary restraining order blocking the agency from publishing comments related to its contested investigation of the pharmacy, with the parties saying they have executed a settlement.

  • March 18, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive CUNY Profs' Union Antisemitism Suit

    The Second Circuit won't revive a suit lodged by six Jewish professors at the City University of New York claiming that a state law unlawfully requires them to associate with a union that they allege holds antisemitic views, ruling that the provision passes muster under the U.S. Constitution.

  • March 18, 2024

    Connecticut Exonerees Ask Lawmakers For Help After Prison

    The Connecticut Legislature's joint judiciary committee is considering sweeping changes to the way the state compensates exonerated convicts, and three men who each served more than 18 years in prison urged lawmakers Monday to make one edit that would apply the bill to pending state-level claims.

  • March 18, 2024

    Subway Franchise Fight Order Can't Be Nixed, Court Hears

    A company that helps to develop and service Subway restaurants in western Canada is urging a New York court not to vacate an arbitrator's order requiring the sub shop's Canadian franchisor to continue making payments on their pact while they arbitrate a contractual feud.

  • March 18, 2024

    Conn. Judge Won't Halt Ex-Yale Student's Case After 'Doxxing'

    A Connecticut federal judge determined Monday that acquitted former Yale University student Saifullah Khan's decision to reveal his onetime sexual assault accuser's name on X, the social media site formerly known as Twitter, isn't fatal to a defamation lawsuit against the woman despite an anonymity order.

  • March 15, 2024

    DOJ Deal Gives Conn. Inmates New Religious Freedoms

    The Connecticut Department of Correction will offer expanded opportunities for group religious exercise to inmates in the state prison system after reaching an agreement that ends an investigation by federal authorities, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • March 15, 2024

    Appeals Court Rejects Medical Cannabis User's Bias Suit

    A Connecticut appeals court refused to reinstate a former teaching assistant's lawsuit accusing a nonprofit of firing her because she has epilepsy, which she treats with medicinal cannabis, saying she failed to overcome the organization's argument that she was fired for being high around children.

  • March 15, 2024

    2nd Circ. OKs Mississippi River Charter For Swiss Cruise Co.

    The Second Circuit on Friday backed a federal maritime agency's granting of a Mississippi River charter to the U.S. arm of Swiss cruise line operator Viking Cruises Ltd., finding that the decision wasn't arbitrary or capricious, but the court declined to weigh in on the legality of such arrangements in general.

  • March 15, 2024

    Kwok Daughter Says Ch. 11 Judge Can't Hear RICO Suit

    The daughter of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok has implored a Connecticut bankruptcy judge to punt to the district court the civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations claims that a Chapter 11 trustee for her father leveled, contending they raise "significant issues involving non-bankruptcy federal law."

  • March 15, 2024

    Biz Groups Back Yale Win In 2nd Circ. ERISA Battle

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce told the Second Circuit that Yale University employees are trying to set a "wildly impractical" standard in their request for a new jury trial after they were awarded zero damages in their suit accusing the school of saddling their retirement plan with high fees.

  • March 15, 2024

    Amazon Tells 2nd Circ. Security Screenings Aren't Work

    Amazon told the Second Circuit that the security screenings employees underwent after their shifts were over aren't work and should be compensated as such, urging the panel to keep a Connecticut federal court's ruling in its favor.

  • March 14, 2024

    US Trustee Knocks Plan To Shield Swiss Firm In Kwok Ch. 11

    The Office of the U.S. Trustee has criticized the planned terms of appointment for Prager Dreifuss AG as Swiss counsel to the Chapter 11 trustee overseeing the bankruptcy of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok, saying the proposed limitations on the firm's liability and expense reimbursement process are not up to snuff.

  • March 14, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms Breitling Fair Use Win In 'Red Gold' TM Suit

    A split Second Circuit panel on Thursday affirmed a Connecticut federal judge's decision that Breitling USA Inc. fairly used the phrase "red gold" to describe the color of its products after a California jeweler with a 2003 trademark registration battled the Swiss watchmaker over its use of the phrase.

  • March 14, 2024

    NY High Court Says Out-Of-State Applicants Can Sue For Bias

    New York's highest court ruled Thursday that nonresidents who were denied employment in the state can bring claims under New York City and state anti-discrimination laws, settling a question that lower courts have long struggled with.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Health System's Win In COVID Vax Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit declined Thursday to reopen a former NYC Health and Hospitals employee's suit alleging he was fired because he refused to get the COVID-19 vaccine in accordance with his Christian beliefs, saying his new arguments on appeal can't be considered.

  • March 14, 2024

    2nd Circ. Keeps COVID Furloughs Suit Out Of Arbitration

    Three former Four Seasons hotel employees' yearslong COVID-related furloughs don't fall under their employment agreements and are therefore not arbitrable, the Second Circuit ruled, affirming a lower court's decision keeping the workers' suit in court.

  • March 13, 2024

    Judge Says COVID Test Suit Depends On Conn. Justices

     A Connecticut federal judge trimmed several claims from a $783,000 suit over a COVID-19 testing bill that a health plan administrator allegedly failed to pay, but declined to rule on certain state law issues until the state's highest court can shed light on the statutes in an upcoming ruling.

  • March 13, 2024

    Aetna Can't Avoid Bias Suit Over Fertility Treatment Policy

    Aetna must face a proposed class action alleging it readily covers fertility treatments for infertile heterosexual women but forces non-heterosexual women to spend thousands out of pocket before paying for their treatments, with a Connecticut federal judge saying it doesn't matter if the insurer didn't control the health plan's terms.

  • March 13, 2024

    Wash. Law Firm, Travelers Settle $136K Theft Coverage Fight

    A Seattle law firm and Travelers settled their coverage dispute over an employee's nearly $136,000 worth of unauthorized charges on a credit card, the parties told a Washington federal court.

  • March 13, 2024

    40-Nation Noncompete Must Be Nixed, Conn. Trader Says

    A Connecticut trader who quit his job at Rowayton-based Graham Capital Management LP is seeking a quick win on arguments that his two-year noncompete agreement, which he says bans him from working in more than 40 nations worldwide, is too broad to be enforced under Nutmeg State law.

  • March 13, 2024

    Split 2nd Circ. Frees Ex-Apollo Exec From SEC Fraud Fine

    A split Second Circuit panel on Wednesday released a former Apollo Management senior partner from a $240,000 civil penalty in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suit alleging he used phony expense reports to fund a lavish lifestyle, saying there was no way for him to know that his customers would ultimately be charged.

  • March 12, 2024

    Bolt Financial's Chairman Is Controlling Board, Suit Says

    Stockholders of Bolt Financial Inc. on Monday updated their derivative complaint against the company's board of directors, alleging chairman, controlling shareholder and former CEO Ryan Breslow purposely defaulted on a $30 million loan that was secured by Bolt and that he has repeatedly appointed and removed directors for his personal interests.

Expert Analysis

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    What Happens If High Court Rejects Releases In Purdue Ch. 11

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    Reading the tea leaves following the U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, it appears likely that the justices will decide that bankruptcy courts lack the power to release third-party claims against nondebtors, which would result in one of three scenarios, says Gregory Germain at Syracuse University.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • 7 Critical Copyright And AI Questions Courts Need To Address

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    U.S. courts have yet to rule on many copyright issues regarding generative artificial intelligence technologies, so developers and users should consider several questions when evaluating risks, developing risk mitigation plans and making decisions about particular use cases, say John Delaney and Sean West at Perkins Coie.

  • How Purdue High Court Case Will Shape Ch. 11 Mass Injury

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, addressing the authority of bankruptcy courts to approve nonconsensual third-party releases in Chapter 11 settlement plans, highlight the case's wide-ranging implications for how mass injury cases get resolved in bankruptcy proceedings, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

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