Construction

  • March 15, 2024

    DC Circ. Presses FERC On Justification For Pipeline Expansion

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Friday questioned whether the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission had demonstrated that a Northeast pipeline expansion project was necessary to ensure that the region would have enough natural gas during extremely cold weather.

  • March 15, 2024

    Firm, Mont. Tribal Council To Settle Violence Dispute

    Greenberg Traurig LLP, its longtime counsel and a Montana tribal council are looking to settle a dispute in which the law firm and attorney are accused of devising a financial scheme that led to violence over a decision to remove the board of directors of the tribe's economic entity.

  • March 15, 2024

    Justices Told Estate Incorrectly Taxed On Insurance Payout

    The federal government's argument that the $3.5 million in life insurance proceeds a company used to redeem a deceased owner's shares increased both the company's value and its dead owner's estate tax liability ignores "economic reality," the estate told the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday.

  • March 15, 2024

    Military Subcontractor Says Partner Tried To Poach Work

    A federal subcontractor tasked with building secure facilities for the Marine Corps hit its own subcontractor with a $7 million lawsuit on Friday, accusing its former partner of deliberately undermining that construction work, in an effort to "steal" related contracts.

  • March 15, 2024

    Contractor's Single Claim For 2 Lost Trucks Enough, For Now

    A contractor didn't need to separate the value of two trucks lost by the U.S. Army to get the military to pay for replacement vehicles, an appeals board said, rejecting the Army's arguments that the contractor should have filed two claims.

  • March 15, 2024

    Fla. Jury Lets Insurer Off Hook For $12M Award

    A Florida federal jury on Friday found that National Indemnity Company of the South did not act in bad faith in its handling of claims against a Florida Keys construction and landscaping company and the company's employee over a fatal car crash that led to an $11.8 million judgment.

  • March 15, 2024

    Divided 5th Circ. Rejects Atomic Waste Site Dispute Rehearing

    A narrowly divided Fifth Circuit has widened a circuit split by refusing to reconsider its ruling that U.S. nuclear energy regulators illegally approved an atomic waste site in West Texas, ruling the Lone Star State and mineral owners could challenge the decision without participating in the licensing process.

  • March 15, 2024

    Wash. Justices Affirm Condo's Roof Damage Coverage Win

    A resulting loss exception in a condominium complex's policy with Farmers Insurance Exchange preserves coverage for damage caused by potentially covered perils, such as condensation and water vapor, even though the loss resulted from excluded faulty workmanship, the Washington Supreme Court unanimously ruled.

  • March 15, 2024

    Unproven ID Theft Claim Can't Thwart $5.7M Duties, Feds Say

    Customs officials urged the U.S. Court of International Trade to ignore a wheel importer's identity theft claim as it tries to escape $5.7 million in duties, saying Friday that the importer had failed to prove the wheels were falsely shipped in its name.

  • March 15, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Howard Kennedy face legal action by a London hotel chain, former racing boss Bernie Ecclestone and Formula One hit with a breach of contract claim by a Brazilian racecar driver, and a libel row between broadcaster Jeremy Vine and ex-footballer Joey Barton. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ex-LA Official Lied To Feds Immediately In Interview, Jury Told

    An FBI agent told a California federal jury on Thursday in former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan's federal bribery trial that Chan lied to him during a 2018 interview immediately after he was warned that lying to the bureau is a crime.

  • March 14, 2024

    Lawmakers Secure $1.3B For Native American Housing

    A record $1.34 billion will go toward Native American housing programs as part of an appropriations package passed by Congress, a $324 million increase over last year's funding.

  • March 14, 2024

    Wash. Supreme Court Again Backs State's Fair Wage Law

    The Washington State Supreme Court has again upheld the state's updated prevailing wage law for public works projects, ruling Thursday that there was no problem with regulators using collective bargaining agreements across county lines to set wage standards.

  • March 14, 2024

    Wash. Real Estate Co.'s Ch 11 Plan OK'd After Judgment Slashed

    Washington state-based commercial and residential real estate company High Valley Investments LLC 's Chapter 11 plan received a Delaware bankruptcy judge's blessing Thursday after a settlement agreement slashed a $47.4 million judgment against it to an $18 million claim.

  • March 14, 2024

    Locke Lord Must Face Oil Co.'s Malpractice Suit In NJ

    A New Jersey state judge rejected Locke Lord LLP's attempt to evade an oil company's malpractice suit alleging that the firm and one of its former attorneys mishandled a transaction involving an oil refinery project in North Dakota, causing the company to lose $2.5 million

  • March 13, 2024

    Developer Must Arbitrate Defamation Case, Court Hears

    A California man who's been accused of publicly badmouthing a Mexican developer of luxury homes in Baja California Sur to put off prospective buyers is urging a New York court to toss the developer's defamation suit against him or send the claims to an ongoing arbitration in Mexico.

  • March 13, 2024

    Subpoenas Can't Skirt USPTO Discovery Rules, 4th Circ. Says

    In a precedential ruling, the Fourth Circuit said Wednesday that companies can't use the subpoena power of the courts to go beyond the limits of discovery that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office puts on deposing employees in foreign countries.  

  • March 13, 2024

    Importers Threading Chinese Rod In US To Duck Tariffs, Feds Say

    Importers appear to be shipping blank steel rod from China to the U.S. to dodge tariffs on alloy and certain carbon steel threaded rod, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced in a Federal Register notice posted Wednesday.

  • March 13, 2024

    NC City Asks State Justices To Review Homebuilders' $5M Win

    The North Carolina city of Greensboro urged the state's high court to review the $5.25 million judgment won by D.R. Horton Inc. and True Homes LLC in the homebuilders' class action accusing the city of charging illegal preservice water fees.

  • March 13, 2024

    Dodging Attempt Doesn't Invalidate Service, 3rd Circ. Told

    A consulting firm suing a construction company for failing to pay for its services related to a separate lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs told a Third Circuit panel Wednesday that it served process to the defendant, in spite of the principal's alleged attempts to dodge service.

  • March 13, 2024

    NYC Condo Developer's Ch. 11 Liquidation Plan Gets OK

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved the Chapter 11 liquidation plan of 540 West 21st St. Holdings LLC, the developer of a scrapped luxury condo project in New York City's West Chelsea neighborhood, overruling an objection from the managers of a neighboring building.

  • March 13, 2024

    Autism Claims Tossed In Lockheed Martin Toxic Land Suit

    A Florida federal judge has thrown out autism-related claims in a suit alleging Lockheed Martin Corp.'s weapons factory in Orlando leaked toxic chemicals, saying the science underlying the plaintiffs' expert's opinion "is just not there."

  • March 13, 2024

    Flint Found In Contempt Over Lead Pipe Replacement Delays

    A Michigan federal judge has found the city of Flint in contempt for dragging its heels on court orders to replace the city's lead pipes after a 2017 settlement, finding that its belated, partial compliance was not enough to avoid the sanction.

  • March 13, 2024

    Patriots Owner Flags $2M Lien On 'Useless' Skydiving Facility

    The real estate business of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft asked a Massachusetts judge to discharge a $2 million mechanic's lien on a defunct indoor wind tunnel and skydiving attraction at a shopping center next to the football team's stadium.

  • March 13, 2024

    Tower Taxes To Partly Fund $10B Midtown NYC Bus Terminal

    Tax revenue from up to three private towers would help pay for a $10 billion replacement of the aging Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, under a deal approved by New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, New York City Mayor Eric Adams and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Navigating USCIS' New Minimum EB-5 Investment Period

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    Recent significant modifications to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ EB-5 at-risk requirement are causing uncertainty for several reasons, but investors who consider certain key aspects of prospective projects can mitigate the immigration and investment risks, say Samuel Silverman at EB5AN, Ronald Klasko at Klasko Immigration, and Kate Kalmykov at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • DC Ruling Provides Support For Builders Risk Claim Recovery

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    To deny coverage for builders risk claims, insurers have been increasingly relying on two arguments, both of which have been invalidated in the recent U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia decision, South Capitol Bridgebuilders v. Lexington, say Greg Podolak and Cheryl Kozdrey at Saxe Doernberger.

  • What NJ's Green Remediation Guidance Means For Cleanups

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    Recent guidance from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection promoting greener approaches to restoring contaminated sites demonstrates the state's commitment to sustainability and environmental justice — but could also entail more complexity, higher costs and longer remediation timelines, say J. Michael Showalter and Bradley Rochlen at ArentFox Schiff.

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