Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • April 16, 2024

    Autonomy CEO Pressured JPMorgan Over Analyst, Jury Told

    An ex-JPMorgan stock analyst testifying Tuesday in the criminal fraud trial of former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch told jurors that the software company founder responded with hostility when his research reports questioned its growth, and that Lynch offered JPMorgan millions in business if he were taken off the Autonomy beat.

  • April 16, 2024

    Cigna Denies Insurer's Claim For PPI Complaints Indemnity

    Cigna hit back at insurer PA (GI) Ltd.'s claim to recover its costs of dealing with missold payment protection insurance for healthcare cover, saying that it is not entitled to any compensation.

  • April 16, 2024

    Hill Dickinson Bolsters Disputes Team With New Partner

    Hill Dickinson LLP has snapped up a partner from Teacher Stern LLP to join its commercial litigation team, bringing a wealth of dispute resolution and crisis management experience to the table.

  • April 16, 2024

    Legal Experts Uneasy About Post Office Convictions Law

    Legal experts warned a parliamentary committee Tuesday that government plans to introduce legislation to quash the convictions of hundreds of Post Office branch managers could unintentionally set a precedent for other miscarriages of justice. 

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Says Lawyers Ignored Prosecution Risks

    The Post Office's former chief executive said Tuesday that he was "surprised" that in-house lawyers who prosecuted sub-postmasters based on faulty IT data ignored the risk of failing to disclose certain key facts in court.

  • April 16, 2024

    EU Watchdogs Ally With ECB To Help Firms' Data Reporting

    European Union finance watchdogs said Tuesday they have set up an alliance with Europe's central bank to collaborate more efficiently on regulatory data transfers, reducing reporting costs for financial firms.

  • April 16, 2024

    Cooley Hires Ex-Norton Rose Antitrust Chief In London

    Cooley LLP has recruited Norton Rose Fulbright's London antitrust and competition chief to its London office as a partner in an effort to boost its ability to advise clients on competition disputes across the U.K. and the European Union.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Real Estate Plans Were £50M Ponzi Scheme, Investors Say

    Over 400 real estate investors said two British men ran a U.K.-wide fraud akin to a Ponzi scheme at a London trial of their £50 million ($62.3 million) claim Monday, arguing the men had made false promises about the returns the investments would generate.

  • April 15, 2024

    Broker Hit With £15M Claim Over Mexican Reinsurance Policies

    A Mexican reinsurance broker and one of its clients are suing a London-based broker for more than £14.8 million ($18.4 million), claiming that one of the U.K. company's agents faked documents for nonexistent reinsurance arrangements and pocketed the proceeds.

  • April 15, 2024

    SRA Accuses Lawyer Of Profiting From Client Loans

    A solicitor profited from his clients' financial difficulties by convincing them to enter into financial arrangements for his benefit, the Solicitors Regulation Authority told a tribunal Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    AML Exec Loses Bid For Interim Pay In Whistleblowing Case

    The co-founder of a London-based payments platform provider has lost his bid to be paid his £190,000 ($237,000) salary while he pursues a whistleblowing and unfair dismissal claim against the company.

  • April 15, 2024

    Skat Kicks Off £1.4B London Trial Against British Trader

    A British trader was accused Monday of being the "mastermind" behind a fraudulent trading scheme that cost the Danish tax authority £1.4 billion ($1.7 billion) at the start of a year-long High Court trial.

  • April 12, 2024

    Credit Suisse, Lloyds, Others Ink $3.5M Libor Deal

    Plaintiffs in the yearslong suit alleging various big banks manipulated the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor, have reached a $3.45 million settlement with Credit Suisse AG, Lloyds Bank and others, bringing the total settlement recovery amount to more than $780 million.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr. Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 12, 2024

    Abbott Loses Bid To Nix UK Whistleblowing Case On Appeal

    An appeals tribunal has rejected Abbott Laboratories' bid to escape a whistleblowing case brought by the founders of a British DNA technology business that it bought, concluding on Friday that the founders had an arguable case that U.K. judges had jurisdiction.

  • April 12, 2024

    Denmark's £1.4B Tax Fraud Trial Heads For 'Uncharted Waters'

    Denmark will open its £1.4 billion ($1.7 billion) dividend fraud case in London on Monday, beginning a yearlong trial that will have wide implications for other disputes arising out of the cum-ex trading scandal that has swept Europe.

  • April 12, 2024

    Over 800 Directors Banned For COVID Loan Fraud In 1 Yr

    A total of 831 company directors were banned in the last 12 months for defrauding the COVID loan support scheme for businesses following investigations by the Insolvency Service, the government agency said Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    FCA Warns Motor Financing Firms To Hold Enough Capital

    Britain's financial watchdog warned lenders Friday to keep enough cash at all times for their motor financing business as the regulator continues to look into a recent increase in customer complaints.

  • April 12, 2024

    Apple Loses Bid To Toss $1B App Maker Charges Case

    The Competition Appeal Tribunal refused on Friday to toss a £785 million ($996 million) proposed class action by app developers against Apple over commission payments after finding that the claimants had a real shot at showing that the case was governed by U.K. law.

  • April 12, 2024

    Ex-MoD Official Imprisoned For Taking Secret Kickbacks

    A former Ministry of Defence official was sentenced to 2½ years in prison at a London court on Friday for receiving £70,000 ($88,000) in secret payments as part of a lucrative defense contract in Saudi Arabia.

  • April 11, 2024

    Autonomy Became Less Transparent Before Sale, Jury Told

    An ex-market analyst testifying Thursday in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch duped HP into buying the British company for $11.7 billion told jurors that the company became less forthcoming about some of its accounting a couple of years before the sale.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Sidley Partner Says CPS Did Not Disclose Prosecution Info

    A former Sidley Austin LLP partner, a former senior KPMG LLP official and a banking adviser have hit back at the Crown Prosecution Service in the men's £66 million ($82.8 million) claim over a failed tax fraud prosecution, arguing that their prosecutor hid important information from them.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Denies 'Cover Up' Of IT Bugs

    A former Post Office boss has denied trying to "cover up" the fact that senior members of the organization knew the IT system used to prosecute hundreds of innocent sub-postmasters was faulty, as he gave evidence to an inquiry Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Cable Co. Says Funding For Price Fixing CPO Lacks 'Visibility'

    A major European power cable supplier questioned Thursday whether a representative seeking damages on behalf of U.K. electricity customers had allocated enough money to cover their costs during a hearing to decide whether the mass claim should be certified.

Expert Analysis

  • How European Authorities Are Foiling Anti-Competitive Hiring

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    Lawyers at Squire Patton discuss key labor practice antitrust concerns and notable regulation trends in several European countries following recent enforcement actions brought by the European Commission and U.K. Competition and Markets Authority.

  • FCA Promotions Review Sends A Strong Message To Firms

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    The recent FCA review into firms' compliance with the rules on promoting high-risk investments to retail clients clarifies that it expects the letter and the spirit of the rules to be followed, and given the interplay with the consumer duty, there are wider implications at stake, say Marina Reason and Chris Hurn at Herbert Smith.

  • When Can Bonuses Be Clawed Back?

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    The High Court's recent decision in Steel v. Spencer should remind employees that the contractual conditions surrounding bonuses and the timing of any resignation must be carefully considered, as in certain circumstances, bonuses can and are being successfully clawed back by employers, say Merrill April and Rachael Parker at CM Murray.

  • The State Of UK Litigation Funding After Therium Ruling

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    The recent English High Court decision in Therium v. Bugsby Property has provided a glimmer of hope for litigation funders about how courts will interpret this summer's U.K. Supreme Court ruling that called funding agreements impermissible, suggesting that its adverse effects may be mitigated, says Daniel Williams at DWF Law.

  • UK Shareholding Report A Missed Opportunity For New Tech

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    The recommendations in the U.K. Digitization Taskforce's recent report on digitizing and improving the U.K. shareholding framework are moderate but not revolutionary, and its failure to recommend digital ledger technology will impede a full transformation of the system, say Tom Bacon and Andrew Tsang at BCLP.

  • What Lawyers Need To Know About The UK Online Safety Act

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    The recently passed U.K. Online Safety Act requires regulated providers to take action to assess and mitigate user risks, and counsel for these companies should take advantage of Ofcom’s clear desire to have a collaborative relationship and improve governance, say Rachael Annear and Tristan Lockwood at Freshfields.

  • Trial By AI Could Be Closer Than You Think

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    In a known first for the U.K., a Court of Appeal justice recently admitted to using ChatGPT to write part of a judgment, highlighting how AI could make the legal system more efficient and enable the judicial process to record more accurate and fair decisions, say Charles Kuhn and Neide Lemos at Clyde & Co.

  • Employer Considerations After Visa And Application Fee Hikes

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    The U.K.'s recent visa and application fee increases are having a significant financial impact on businesses, and may heighten the risk of hiring discrimination, so companies should carefully reconsider their budgets accordingly, says Adam Sinfield at Osborne Clarke.

  • Why It's Urgent For Pharma Cos. To Halt Counterfeit Meds

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    With over 10.5 million counterfeit medicines seized in the EU in 2023, it is vital both ethically and commercially that pharmaceutical companies take steps to protect against such infringements, including by invoking intellectual property rights protection, says Lars Karnøe at Potter Clarkson.

  • Nix Of $11B Award Shows Limits Of Arbitral Process

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    A recent English High Court decision in Nigeria v. Process & Industrial Developments, overturning an arbitration award because it was obtained by fraud, is a reminder that arbitration decisions are ultimately still accountable to the courts, and that the relative simplicity of the arbitration rules is not necessarily always a benefit, say Robin Henry and Abbie Coleman at Collyer Bristow.

  • How The Netherlands Became A Hub For EU Class Actions

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    As countries continue to implement the European Union Collective Redress Directive, the Netherlands — the country with the largest class action docket in the EU — provides a real-world example of what class and mass litigation may eventually look like in the bloc, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker and Houthoff.

  • Navigating The Novel Challenges Facing The Legal Profession

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    The increasing prominence of ESG and AI have transformed the legal landscape and represent new opportunities for lawyers, but with evolving regulations and the ever-expanding reach of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, law firms should ensure that they have appropriate policies in place to adapt to these challenges, say Scott Ashby and Aimee Talbot at RPC.

  • Sustainable Finance Consultations May Signal Key Changes

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    The European Commission's recently launched consultations on the sustainable finance disclosure regulation point to important changes, including the potential introduction of a new product categorization system, and illustrate that there are clearly issues with the existing framework, say Ferdisha Snagg and Andreas Wildner at Cleary.

  • Deal Over Jets Stranded In Russia May Serve As Blueprint

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    In the face of a pending "mega-trial" over leased airplanes held in Russia after its invasion of Ukraine, a settlement between leading aviation lessor AerCap Holdings NV and NSK, the Russian state-controlled insurance company, could pave the way for similar deals, say Samantha Zaozirny and Timeyin Pinnick at Browne Jacobson.

  • Economic Crime Act Brings Changes For Limited Partnerships

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    The recently passed Economic Crime Act introduces significant financial transparency obligations for new and existing U.K. limited partnerships, and with criminal consequences for noncompliance, a degree of advance consideration is strongly advised, say Amelia Stawpert and Alex Jones at Hogan Lovells.

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