Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • April 09, 2024

    'You're Going To Lose These People,' Judge Tells Lynch Atty

    U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on Tuesday chided a Steptoe partner representing former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch in his criminal fraud jury trial, saying that his hourslong questioning of a Deloitte partner shouldn't go on much longer, or "you're going to lose these people."

  • April 09, 2024

    Tory Donor Wins First Defamation Fight Against BBC

    Telecoms magnate and Conservative Party donor Mohamed Amersi won the first hurdle in his defamation battle against the BBC on Tuesday when the High Court ruled that BBC reports suggested to the public there were strong grounds to suspect that he had been involved in corruption and bribery scandals.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Employee Says Post Office Fought Exoneration Efforts

    A former subpostmaster who led a fight to exonerate innocent people prosecuted by the Post Office and wrongly convicted of fraud, theft and false accounting — based on faulty IT data — said the organization was determined to "protect the brand at all costs," as the inquiry into the scandal resumed Tuesday.

  • April 09, 2024

    Apple To Appeal Funding OK For IPhone Users' £853M Claim

    Apple has won permission to appeal a decision to let an £853 million ($1 billion) class action claim go ahead for allegations the tech giant concealed problems with iPhone batteries, despite challenges to the funding arrangements.

  • April 09, 2024

    Labour Party Pledges £5.1B Tax Crackdown If Elected

    Britain's opposition Labour Party pledged Tuesday to raise £5.1 billion ($6.5 billion) by closing tax loopholes and cracking down on tax avoidance schemes if it wins the next election, expected later this year.

  • April 09, 2024

    Newcastle United Accused Of Harming Fans With Kit Deal

    Lawyers representing Sports Direct asked the U.K.'s antitrust court on Tuesday to grant an injunction to force Newcastle United to stock its stores with the soccer club's replica kits after a rival retailer was given an exclusive supply deal.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Says Boss's Invoice Ask Caused Concern

    A former Autonomy finance employee took the stand Monday in the criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch and finance director Stephen Chamberlain, telling a California federal jury that he was "not comfortable" with one of Chamberlain's invoice requests and was sacked after raising concerns about accounting irregularities.

  • April 08, 2024

    UK Eyes Reforms To Ease Corporate Apologies To Victims

    The government opened a new consultation on Monday into potential reforms that would make it easier for companies to apologize to alleged victims of wrongdoing, including in cases where organizations might be vicariously liable for the actions of an employee or a member.

  • April 08, 2024

    Minister Calls For Prison Time Over Post Office IT Scandal

    Individuals in the Post Office who wrongfully prosecuted innocent sub-postmasters "should go to jail," a minister said on Monday, on the eve of the inquiry into the miscarriage of justice resuming.

  • April 08, 2024

    Attwells Denies Breaking Promise In £1.2M Loan Dispute

    Attwells Solicitors LLP has denied promising that it was acting on behalf of a man who, the law firm says, was probably fraudulently posing as the owner of two properties in a move to borrow £775,000 ($980,000) from a finance company.

  • April 08, 2024

    Grant Thornton Fined For Audit Compliance Breaches

    The Financial Reporting Council said Monday it has fined accounting firm Grant Thornton £40,000 ($50,500) for failing to comply with audit regulations in its work on a local authority's pension fund.

  • April 05, 2024

    CMS Breached Instructions Over Lawyer Fees, Ex-Client Says

    A former CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP client told a London court Friday that the law firm acted in breach of instructions when using some of the money earmarked for counsel in civil and criminal proceedings to pay itself.

  • April 05, 2024

    High Court Limits Use Of Confidential Info In $3.7B Asset Fight

    Relatives of a dead Russian oligarch and an investment company accused of international fraud on Friday partially succeeded in obtaining an order to prevent the alleged misuse of their confidential information.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC sued by former Georgian defense minister David Kezerashvili, Russian businessman Ildar Sharipov file a defamation claim against the publisher of the Liverpool Echo newspaper, MEX Group Worldwide sue Barclays and NatWest, and a climbing gear company hit retailer Next with a claim of copyright infringement. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 05, 2024

    6 Questions For Paul Hastings' Stuart Alford KC

    Paul Hastings LLP's new partner, Stuart Alford KC, is a former senior official at the Serious Fraud Office and has worked at two heavyweight U.S. firms, Kirkland & Ellis and Latham & Watkins. Here, he talks to Law360 about his career and about white-collar crime.

  • April 05, 2024

    18 Crime Gangs Specialize In VAT Fraud, Europol Says

    Eighteen major criminal gangs in the European Union specialize in value-added tax fraud, having end-to-end control over the entire criminal process, the EU's law enforcement agency said Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    Counterfeiters Flourish In Wake Of COVID, IP Body Says

    The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a global uptick in the trade of counterfeit goods, beginning with fake healthcare products but spreading to other areas of trade as virtually all shopping moved online, a new report found Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    Cloud Biz Denies Owing Telecom Execs Over Bad Sale

    A cloud technology business has denied owing directors of a telecommunications company £1.5 million ($1.9 million) left unpaid after it bought their business, claiming the money due is offset by the £2 million it lost from the sale.

  • April 05, 2024

    Retired Rabbi To Return £2.3M To Charities After NCA Probe

    A retired rabbi will return £2.35 million ($3 million) to two charities after he kept the money rather than distribute it for its intended legitimate causes, the National Crime Agency said on Friday.

  • April 04, 2024

    UK Billionaire Lewis Avoids Prison For Insider Trading

    A New York federal judge on Thursday sentenced British billionaire Joe Lewis to three years of probation for feeding his girlfriend and private-jet pilots nonpublic stock tips about his private equity firm's portfolio companies, saying a prison term would put the 87-year-old at "serious risk" of death.

  • April 04, 2024

    Sexually Harassed Class Helper Fired For Lying Wins Payout

    A teaching assistant who lied about having COVID-19 to go on vacation has won a £9,309 ($11,775) payout after a female headmaster sexually harassed him, then sacked him following a flawed investigation into his lies.

  • April 04, 2024

    Pillsbury's New UK White Collar Chief Eyes Success In London

    Former Serious Fraud Office "powerhouse" Audrey Koh is in the building, and Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman says it now has the tools to launch its white-collar and corporate investigations practice in London. Here, Koh and managing partner Matthew Oresman survey the legal landscape.

  • April 04, 2024

    FCA To Claw Back £1.6M From Fund Manager For Investors

    The Financial Conduct Authority said on Thursday that it has won court approval to take £1.6 million ($2 million) from fund manager Argento Wealth and its only director, who promoted two allegedly unlawful investment schemes.

  • April 04, 2024

    UK Joins Global Data Protection Enforcement Program

    Britain's data watchdog said Thursday it has signed a new agreement with the Global Cooperation Arrangement for Privacy Enforcement to cooperate on cross-border data protection with the U.S. and eight other Pacific Rim countries.

  • April 04, 2024

    Stagecoach Poised To Settle In £93M Train Ticket Class Action

    Train operator Stagecoach is seeking to end its role in a £93 million ($118 million) collective action brought on behalf of passengers who allegedly paid double for their journeys, documents published by the Competition Appeal Tribunal on Thursday reveal.

Expert Analysis

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Opinion

    PACCAR Should Be 1st Step To Regulating Litigation Funders

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    Rather than reversing the U.K. Supreme Court's well-reasoned judgment in PACCAR v. Competition Appeal Tribunal, imposing a regulatory regime on litigation funders in parity with that of lawyers, legislators should build upon it to create a more transparent, competitive and fairer funding industry, says Rosa Curling at Foxglove.

  • EEA Equivalence Statement Is Welcomed By Fund Managers

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    The recent statement confirming European Economic Area equivalence to undertakings for collective investment in transferable securities for U.K. overseas funds regime purposes removes many managers’ concerns in the wake of Brexit, giving a clear pathway out of temporary marketing permissions and easing the transition from one regime to another, says Catherine Weeks at Simmons & Simmons.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • Post Office Scandal Stresses Key Directors Duties Lessons

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    The Post Office scandal, involving hundreds of wrongful convictions of subpostmasters based on an IT failure, offers lessons for company directors on the magnitude of the impact that a failure to fulfill their duties can have on employees and the company, says Simon Goldberg at Simons Muirhead.

  • Employer Tips For Handling Data Subject Access Requests

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    As employers face numerous employee data-subject access requests — and the attendant risks of complaints to the Information Commissioner's Office — issues such as managing deadlines and sifting through data make compliance more difficult, highlighting the importance of efficient internal processes and clear communication when responding to a request, say Gwynneth Tan and Amy Leech at Shoosmiths.

  • Comparing UK And EU's View On 3rd-Party Service Providers

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    The U.K. is taking welcome steps to address the lack of direct oversight over critical third-party service providers, and although less onerous than that of the EU Digital Operational Resilience Act, the U.K. regime's proportionate approach is designed to make providers more robust and reliable, say lawyers at Shearman.

  • CMA Road Map Helps Cos. Prepare For UK Digital Markets Bill

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    Although only provisional, the recent publication of the Competition and Markets Authority's road map for the implementation of the U.K. Digital Markets Bill demonstrates that the regulator is keen to reassure Parliament that it takes accountability seriously, and that there will be sufficient safeguards in place regarding its decision making, say lawyers at Morgan Lewis.

  • Opinion

    European Union Criticisms Of The FCPA Are Misguided

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    Some in the European Union have criticized U.S. enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for what they perceive as jurisdictional overreach, but this appears to overlook the crucial fact that jurisdiction is voluntary, and critics should focus instead on the lack of equivalent laws in their own region, say John Joy and YuTong Wang at FTI Law.

  • Key Points Of BoE Response To Digital Pound Consultation

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    Lawyers at Hogan Lovells analyze the recent Bank of England and U.K. government response to a consultation on the launch of a digital pound, finding that the phased approach to evaluating the issues makes sense given the significant potential impact on the U.K. economy.

  • Bribery Class Action Ruling May Revive Bifurcated Processes

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision allowing the representative bribery action in Commission Recovery v. Marks & Clerk offers renewed hope for claimants to advance class claims using a bifurcated process amid its general absence as of late, say Jon Gale and Justin Browne at Ashurst.

  • Goldman Prosecution Delivers A Clear Sign Of FCA Strength

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    The recent successful prosecution of a former Goldman Sachs analyst for insider dealing and fraud is a reminder to regulated individuals that economic crime will never be tolerated, and that the Financial Conduct Authority is willing to bare its teeth in the exercise of its prosecutorial remit, says Doug Cherry at Fladgate.

  • Whistleblower Pay Is A Risky Path For The SFO To Tread

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    In a recent speech, Serious Fraud Office director Nick Ephgrave supported the payment of whistleblowers, but implementing such an extreme measure is potentially hazardous and could leave the new director a hostage to fortune, says Richard Cannon at Stokoe Partnership.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

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