Corporate

  • June 20, 2024

    Ex-McElroy Deutsch CFO Asks To Pull 5th Amend. Assertions

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLC's former chief financial officer, who pled guilty to embezzling over $1.5 million from the firm in May, moved Wednesday to withdraw Fifth Amendment assertions he made in the firm's civil case against him.

  • June 20, 2024

    Prosecutors Deny Spoiling Evidence In OneTaste Case

    Brooklyn federal prosecutors have denied allegations of misconduct in the forced labor conspiracy case against two executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste, who claim an FBI agent instructed a potential key witness to delete emails.

  • June 20, 2024

    Dickinson Wright Brings On McDermott, Bell Nunnally Attys

    Dickinson Wright PLLC added a pair of new members who include a commercial finance and real estate attorney from Bell Nunnally & Martin LLP based in Austin, Texas, and a tax and incentives attorney from McDermott Will & Emery LLP in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  • June 20, 2024

    ZoomInfo Hit With Race Bias Claim By Fired Account Exec

    A Black former senior account executive at ZoomInfo Technologies Inc. says he was repeatedly denied promotions and transfers despite outperforming white colleagues, then was fired in retaliation for filing a discrimination complaint.

  • June 20, 2024

    Tesla Let Racism Go Unchecked In Calif. Factories, Suit Says

    Harassment ran rampant in two Tesla factories where racist graffiti was commonplace and Black and Hispanic workers were taunted with racial slurs, according to a suit filed in California state court.

  • June 20, 2024

    Patent Office Elevates Acting Solicitor To Official Position

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday announced that its longtime litigator Farheena Y. Rasheed has been appointed solicitor and deputy general counsel for the agency.

  • June 20, 2024

    Raytheon, Christian Ex-Worker Agree To End Vax Bias Suit

    Raytheon and a Christian former data manager agreed to end her suit alleging the defense contractor unlawfully fired her because she requested a religious exemption to its COVID-19 vaccination policy, a filing in Florida federal court said.

  • June 20, 2024

    Tax Preparer With $38M In Refunds Cops To S-Corp. Scam

    The owner of a tax preparation business that secured $38 million in federal refunds for customers pled guilty to helping prepare false returns and admitted he required clients to establish empty corporations to lower their tax bills illegally, according to his plea agreement in a California federal court.

  • June 20, 2024

    Mastercard Settles Retailers' Swipe Fees Group Litigation

    Mastercard has settled a class action claim brought by more than 1,900 businesses in ongoing litigation over allegations it imposed excessively high credit card fees on merchants, a person familiar with the case has confirmed.

  • June 20, 2024

    Snapchat Inks $15M Deal In Calif. Watchdog's Sex Bias Suit

    The parent company of Snapchat agreed to pay $15 million to end a California Civil Rights Department suit alleging it discouraged women from applying for promotions and failed to protect them from inappropriate sexual advances, according to a filing in California state court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Qualcomm Investors Ink $75M Deal Over Licensing Practices

    Qualcomm Inc. investors asked a California federal judge to greenlight a $75 million settlement that would resolve their claims that the chipmaker misled the market by stating it kept its licensing and chip-supply businesses separate when it regularly bundled the two in negotiations and agreements.

  • June 18, 2024

    Novant Pays $6.7M For Sharing Patient Data With Facebook

    A North Carolina federal judge on Monday gave the final seal of approval to a proposed $6.7 million deal resolving litigation alleging Novant Health Inc. shared sensitive patient data with Facebook, certifying a nationwide settlement class of roughly 1.3 million individuals.

  • June 18, 2024

    Newsom, Legislators Reach Agreement On PAGA Reform

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including major changes to the law's penalty structure, changes they say will avoid a "contentious" ballot measure campaign.

  • June 18, 2024

    Tesla Can't Beat 'Right-To-Repair' Monopoly Suit This Time

    Tesla must face an amended proposed class action alleging the company runs an unlawful monopoly on parts for its electric vehicles, a California federal judge has ruled, finding that the plaintiffs have addressed issues in their previously dismissed complaint.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ex-CBS Sports Chair Denies Fixing NFL Sunday Ticket Price

    The recently retired chairman of CBS Sports on Tuesday told a California federal jury considering multibillion-dollar antitrust claims against the NFL that his network didn't collude with the league to fix the price of the DirecTV Sunday Ticket television package.

  • June 18, 2024

    RR Donnelley Pays $2.1M To Settle SEC Claims Over Hack

    Marketing and communications giant R.R. Donnelley & Sons has reached a deal with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission to pay over $2.1 million to settle claims over a 2021 cybersecurity incident that stemmed from poor internal controls and disclosure failures, the agency announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    IPhone Buyers Want Canadian Data In Amazon Antitrust Case

    Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. must be forced to turn over Canadian sales data as part of a lawsuit accusing the pair of hatching an anticompetitive agreement to choke third-party sales, a group of iPad and iPhone buyers told a Washington federal court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Microsoft Reaches Deal With Patent Biz After $242M Verdict

    Microsoft indicated on Tuesday that it has decided to settle a fight with a litigation outfit that won a $242 million verdict from a Delaware federal jury over patents bought from a company that developed Apple's Siri software.

  • June 20, 2024

    CORRECTED: Drug Cos., PBMs Score Win In Calif. AG's Insulin Price Suit

    A Los Angeles judge ruled Tuesday that the statute of limitations bars the California Attorney General's unfair competition law and unjust enrichment claims against drugmakers and pharmacy benefit managers over an alleged conspiracy to spike insulin costs, but granted leave to amend the allegations.

  • June 18, 2024

    Amazon Hit With $5.9M Fine For Violating Calif. Quota Law

    California's labor commissioner has fined Amazon $5.9 million for violating the Golden State's Warehouse Quotas Law, which requires employers to give workers written notice of any quotas they must follow, according to a Tuesday announcement.

  • June 18, 2024

    9 Firms Vie To Lead Suit Over Ad Tech Co.'s Microsoft Ties

    Pomerantz LLP, Levi & Korsinsky LLP and several other firms have filed competing bids to lead a proposed shareholder class action alleging that shares of ad tech company Perion Network declined nearly 40% after its strategic partner Microsoft Bing "unilaterally" changed its search advertising pricing.

  • June 18, 2024

    SEC's Ether Orders Spur Hope For Crypto, Caution From Attys

    The crypto industry received a step toward clarity when the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's approval of exchange-traded products holding the token ether signified the cryptocurrency isn't a security subject to SEC regulation, but attorneys say they remain cautious when counseling clients on how to deal in the asset.

  • June 18, 2024

    USPTO Hears Array Of Ideas For Altering Director Review

    Numerous groups have offered suggestions to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on the process where the agency's director reviews Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions, from adjusting which cases are subject to review to barring the director from personally making decisions.

  • June 18, 2024

    Chastened Boeing CEO Vows Fixes In Harsh Senate Hearing

    Boeing's chief steadfastly defended the company's commitment to safety, even as he acknowledged a breakdown in how certain managers responded to whistleblowers who had flagged past questionable design or manufacturing practices, as he endured a grueling public hearing before a Senate panel Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Del. House Panel Splits On Senate-Passed Corp. Law Change

    A divided Delaware House committee released on Tuesday contested amendments to the state's general corporation law, sending the measure toward a full House vote after sometimes edgy testimony that included a committee chair's shutdown of an opposing law professor's reference to HBO's seamy corporate drama series "Succession."

Expert Analysis

  • Wiretap Use In Cartel Probes Likely To Remain An Exception

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    Although the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division has recently signaled interest in wiretaps, the use of this technology to capture evidence of antitrust conspiracies and pursue monopolization as a criminal matter has been rare historically, and is likely to remain so, say Carsten Reichel and Will Conway at DLA Piper.

  • Updates To CFTC Large Trader Report Rules Leave Questions

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    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission's updated large trader position reporting rules for futures and options is a much-needed change that modernizes a rule that had gone largely untouched since the 1980s, but the updates leave important questions unanswered, say Katherine Cooper and Maggie DePoy at BCLP.

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Crafting An Effective Workplace AI Policy After DOL Guidance

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    Employers should take proactive steps to minimize their liability risk after the U.S. Department of Labor released artificial intelligence guidance principles on May 16, reflecting the reality that companies must begin putting into place policies that will dictate their expectations for how employees will use AI, say David Disler and Courtnie Bolden at ​​​​​​​Porzio Bromberg.

  • Patent Lessons From 7 Federal Circuit Reversals In May

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    A look at recent cases where the Federal Circuit reversed or vacated decisions by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board or a federal district court provide guidance on how to succeed on appeal by clarifying the obviousness analysis of design patents, the finality of a judgment, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • How SEC Could Tackle AI Regulations On Brokers, Advisers

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission held an open meeting of its Investor Advisory Committee on June 6 to review the use of artificial intelligence in investment decision making, showing that regulators are being careful not to stifle innovation or implement rules that will quickly be made irrelevant after their passage, says Brian Korn at Manatt Phelps.

  • How M&A Attorneys Can Best Serve Self-Funded Searchers

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    Post-pandemic, and with the so-called great wealth transfer on the horizon, individuals looking for small and midsize businesses to acquire are increasingly going the self-funded route, so deal attorneys must understand the major pain points and unique needs of this demographic, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • What To Know As CFPB Late Fee Rule Hangs In Limbo

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    Though the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's final credit card late fee rule faces an uncertain future due to litigation involving injunctions, emergency petitions and now a venue dispute, card issuers must understand how to navigate the interim period and what to do if the rule takes effect, say attorneys at Steptoe.

  • A Deep Dive Into The Evolving World Of ESG Ratings

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    Attorneys at Mintz discuss the salience of environmental, social and governance ratings in corporate circles in recent years, and consider certain methodologies underlying their calculation for professionals, as well as issues concerning the ESG ratings and products themselves.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Adopting 7 Principles May Improve Voluntary Carbon Markets

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    The Biden administration's recently issued joint policy statement on improving the integrity of voluntary carbon markets may help companies using carbon credits to offset their emissions withstand scrutiny by government agencies, the public and investors, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What The NYSE Proposed Delisting Rule Could Mean For Cos.

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    The New York Stock Exchange's recently proposed rule would provide the exchange with discretionary authority to commence delisting proceedings for a company substantially shifting its primary business focus, raising concerns for NYSE-listed companies over the exact definition of the exchange's proposed "substantially different" standard, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Trademark In Artistic Works 1 Year After Jack Daniel's

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    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court's Jack Daniel's v. VIP Products ruling, courts have applied Jack Daniel's inconsistently to deny First Amendment protection to artistic works, providing guidance for dismissing trademark claims relating to film and TV titles, say Hardy Ehlers and Neema Sahni at Covington.

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