Delaware

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    IRS Asks Justices To Scrap Couple's Late-Filed Tax Court Suit

    The IRS asked the U.S. Supreme Court to consider reversing the Third Circuit's revival of a couple's challenge to their tax bill, saying the appeals court incorrectly concluded that a 90-day deadline for petitioning the U.S. Tax Court need not always be met.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nevada Dem. Says She Can't Support 3rd Circ. Nom.

    U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nevada, on Tuesday became the first Democrat to publicly say she cannot support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge, if confirmed.

  • March 19, 2024

    Kirkland Restructuring Ace To Join Hilco Global As Vice Chair

    James H.M. Sprayregen, the founder of Kirkland & Ellis' restructuring practice group and a well-known deal-maker in the corporate restructuring and mergers and acquisitions community, is set to join Hilco Global as a vice chair, the financial services holding company announced Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Joann Fabric Can Tap $95M Of DIP As It Eyes Quick Ch. 11

    Joann Inc., the retailer known as Joann Fabric and Crafts, received a Delaware bankruptcy judge's approval Tuesday on a bundle of first-day motions, ahead of an impending bid for confirmation of its prepackaged Chapter 11 plan to slash over half a billion dollars of debt and let creditors take over the reorganized business.

  • March 19, 2024

    Skin Care Drug Co. Can Ask Creditors To OK Ch. 11 Plan

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge said Tuesday she will give a debtor formerly known as Timber Pharmaceuticals Inc. permission to send its Chapter 11 plan out for a vote by the dermatology drug developer's creditors, after counsel for the company explained it had expanded the creditors' ability to opt out of the plan's claim releases.

  • March 20, 2024

    Future Of Judge-Shopping Reform Hazy After Rule Proposal

    The policymaking body for U.S. courts provoked a stir last week when it proposed a rule designed to curb "judge shopping," with observers saying that the policy does address one type of the practice but that it remains to be seen if individual federal district courts will be willing to adopt even that limited reform.

  • March 19, 2024

    EV Charging Biz Pitches $400K Ch. 11 Staff Retention Plan

    Charge Enterprises Inc., a company that builds electric vehicle charging stations and other infrastructure, has urged a Delaware bankruptcy judge to let it offer about $400,000 in bonuses to keep a dozen employees the firm deemed critical during its Chapter 11 case.

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says CFPB Can Go After Student Loan Trusts

    The Third Circuit ruled Tuesday that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau can carry on with its debt collection practices suit against a group of Delaware student loan trusts, rejecting their claims that they are just passive financing entities outside the reach of the agency's enforcement authority.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bankman-Fried's Fraud Left FTX Users Reeling, Letters Say

    Customers of Sam Bankman-Fried's fallen crypto exchange are struggling with financial insecurity, skimping on expenses including food and worrying about their assets, according to victim letters lodged ahead of the FTX founder's sentencing for what prosecutors call an $11 billion fraud.

  • March 19, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Can Review Immigration Hardship Denial

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday revived a Trinidad and Tobago native's bid to cancel his removal based on the hardship it would cause his U.S. citizen son, ruling that circuit courts do have authority to review mixed questions of law and fact.

  • March 18, 2024

    Patent Suit Over AstraZeneca's Tagrisso Heads To Jury

    A Delaware federal judge said Monday that there are too many "genuine factual disputes" to end a lawsuit from a Pfizer brand claiming it developed a cancer treatment that's being infringed by a drug that has racked up billions in sales for rival AstraZeneca.

  • March 18, 2024

    Investors Seek Arbitration In Panama Port Fight

    A group of companies and individuals invested in a port project near the Panama Canal's Atlantic Ocean entrance has asked a Delaware federal court to order arbitration in a Hong Kong company's case claiming its interest in the project is being stolen.

  • March 18, 2024

    7th Circ. Wants Del. High Court's Input On Stock Shares Row

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday asked Delaware's top court to clarify a ruling it made earlier this year upholding the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, saying it found "meaningful differences" between that case and an ex-manager's bid before it to keep the stock sale proceeds he earned before working for a competitor.

  • March 18, 2024

    Del. Suit Details Wrongful Takeover Of Telecom System Co.

    The founder and former CEO of a Florida-headquartered telecommunications infrastructure building company has sued the head of an investment firm and others Monday in Delaware's Court of Chancery, accusing them of carrying out a "fraudulent scheme" to wrest control of the business.

  • March 18, 2024

    Singer Seeks Chancery OK To Pull Plug On Licensee Rights

    The owner of rights and trademarks of Singer sewing machine products has sued its North American distributor in Delaware's Court of Chancery, seeking a court declaration that it could end their contract because the distributor failed to meet minimum billing and royalties requirements.

  • March 18, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Amyris Gets OK To Settle Pot Co.'s $15M Trade Secret Suit

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge has approved biotechnology company Amyris' $15.1 million settlement with cannabinoid manufacturer Lavvan, resolving yearslong litigation and arbitration proceedings alleging the debtor misused its then-business partner's trade secrets.

  • March 18, 2024

    One Of Longest-Serving Del. Superior Court Judges Is Retiring

    Delaware's Superior Court is set to lose one of its longest-serving judges, Judge Mary M. Johnston, who is retiring on a yet-to-be disclosed date.

  • March 18, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Multimillion-dollar e-cigarette settlements, $4 billion in stock buybacks and a $6.1 million appraisal tweak were among the big-dollar items logged in the Delaware Court of Chancery's ledger last week. Also on the docket: a Panama port project, a news outlet's defamation case, drone disputes and a flood of mail from Tesla shareholders. In case you missed it, here's all the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Joann Hits Ch. 11 With $1B Secured Debt, Creditor Deal

    Fabric retailer Joann Inc., better known as Joann Fabrics, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on Monday with $1 billion in secured debt and an agreement with its creditors to trim $505 million from its balance sheet.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Ruling Shows Tension Between 363 Sale And Labor Law

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    The Delaware federal court's ruling in the Braeburn Alloy Steel case highlights the often overlooked collision between an unstayed order authorizing an asset sale free and clear of successor liability under Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code and federal labor law imposing successor liability on the buyer, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Del. Insurance Co. Liquidation Reveals Recovery Strategies

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    Arrowood's recent liquidation in the Delaware Chancery Court offers a positive development for policyholders and claimants, providing access to guaranty association protections amid the company's demise, say Timothy Law and Ann Kramer at Reed Smith.

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

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    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

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    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Rockport Ch. 11 Highlights Global Settlement Considerations

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    A Delaware bankruptcy court’s recent rejection of Rockport’s proposed settlement serves as a reminder that there is a risk that a global settlement executed outside of a plan may be rejected as a sub rosa plan, but shouldn’t dissuade parties from seeking relief when applicable case law supports approval, says Kyle Arendsen at Squire Patton.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Opinion

    Activist Short-Sellers Are The Dark Knights Of Wall Street

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    While so-called activist short-sellers have been subject to increased scrutiny in recent years, these investors work in the shadows like Batman to expose fraud on Wall Street, often generating leads that may move regulators to take action, say attorneys at Labaton Sucharow.

  • Managing ANDA Venue Issues As Del. And NJ Filings Rise

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    Delaware and New Jersey have prevailed as the primary forum for pharmaceutical litigation as more generic companies file abbreviated new drug applications, but this venue scheme presents traps for the unwary, and legislation may still be necessary to ensure fairness and predictability, say Timothy Cook and Kevin Yurkerwich at WilmerHale.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

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