Discrimination

  • February 21, 2024

    Columbia, Barnard Don't Protect Jewish Students, Suit Says

    Columbia University and Barnard College have a long history of allowing antisemitism to run rampant on their campuses and most recently have failed to protect Jewish students from harassment and violence following the Hamas-led killings in Israel on Oct. 7, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court in Manhattan.

  • February 21, 2024

    Morgan Stanley Bias Award Fight Belongs In NC, Judge Says

    A Morgan Stanley unit must challenge an arbitrator's conclusion that it discriminated against a white male former banker in North Carolina, where he last worked, a Georgia federal judge ruled, saying the arbitrator's presence in Atlanta during the virtual proceeding isn't enough to tether the case to the Peach State.

  • February 21, 2024

    NLRB Says Home Depot Unlawfully Restricted BLM Protest

    Home Depot violated federal law by telling a worker they could not wear a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron and directing them to remove it, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday, saying the message was connected to earlier group complaints about racism in the workplace.

  • February 21, 2024

    Medical Test Kit Supplier Strikes Deal In EEOC's Hair Bias Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission asked a Louisiana federal court Wednesday to sign off on a $50,000 deal with a medical testing kit supplier accusing it of unlawfully firing a Black salesperson because of her hair, arriving after the company filed for bankruptcy.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Loser Pays' Arbitration Pact Spurs Age Bias Case's Revival

    An Ohio state appeals court revived a fired orthodontist's age bias suit claiming she was sacked after complaining that a younger colleague harassed her, ruling that a trial court was too quick to kick the case to arbitration in light of the contract's potentially problematic "loser pays" clause.

  • February 21, 2024

    MLB Wants Out Of Ex-Scouts' Colorado Age Bias

    Major League Baseball took another swing at dismissing a proposed age discrimination class action filed by several former scouts Tuesday, stressing that the vast majority of the suit has no place in Colorado federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NC Assistant AG's Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive a former assistant attorney general's gender and disability bias suit against the North Carolina Department of Justice, finding her medical conditions weren't extreme enough to warrant pausing the deadline to refile her complaint.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Floats Sanctions For Union's 'Bad Faith' Recusal Bid

    A Michigan federal judge won't recuse himself from a defamation case involving two unions after a claim was raised that he expressed bias against the East Coast, instead asking the defendants why sanctions shouldn't be imposed for "bad faith" litigating.

  • February 21, 2024

    Law Firms Rip Cuomo Subpoenas As 'Abusive' And 'Wasteful'

    Law firms Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC said in a letter Tuesday filed in federal court that former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's subpoena regarding their sex harassment investigation "is plainly improper and is another in a string of abusive and wasteful tactics."

  • February 21, 2024

    Ex-Law Prof Wants High Court To Hear Gender Bias Suit

    A white female former law professor urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear her suit against Texas Southern University, saying the Fifth Circuit held her to too high of a standard to show she was subjected to so much bullying that she was forced to quit.

  • February 21, 2024

    Spencer Fane Adds Labor Pro In Houston From Porter Hedges

    Spencer Fane LLP has strengthened its labor and employment practice with a partner in Houston who came aboard from Porter Hedges LLP.

  • February 21, 2024

    La. Bakery Illegally Fired Pregnant Cook, EEOC Says

    A New Orleans bakery fired a pastry cook just days after she started because she experienced pregnancy complications and told her it would rehire her after she gave birth, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said in a complaint filed in Louisiana federal court. 

  • February 21, 2024

    Physical Therapy Co. Settles EEOC Pregnancy Bias Suit

    A physical therapy practice agreed to hand over $70,000 to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging it rescinded an occupational therapist's job offer after learning she was pregnant, according to a Maryland federal court filing.

  • February 21, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Ex-Baker Botts Labor, Employment Leader

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is deepening its bench in the Lone Star State with the addition of its latest partner in Dallas, the former chair of Baker Botts' labor and employment practice.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Public Defender Sues Over Display Of Israeli Army Photo

    An Illinois public defender filed a First Amendment lawsuit against her county employer after she was reprimanded for a photograph of her holding a gun in front of an Israeli flag that she displayed in an office area in response to the Oct. 7 Hamas terrorist attack in Israel.

  • February 20, 2024

    Kirkland Can't Get 'Invasive' Atty Info From 2 BigLaw Firms

    A California federal magistrate judge barred Kirkland & Ellis LLP from subpoenaing confidential personnel information from a former intellectual property associate's prior employers, Paul Hastings LLP and Fish & Richardson PC, in its defense against her discrimination suit, ruling that Kirkland's subpoena requests are "invasive," irrelevant and "amazingly broad."

  • February 20, 2024

    9th Circ. Reinstates Air Traffic Controller's Age Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a suit Tuesday from an air traffic controller who said the Federal Aviation Administration passed him over for promotions because of his age, ruling the agency can't hide behind a carveout that allows it to restrict the positions to younger applicants.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. State Worker Wins $5K In Racial Hostility Claims

    Connecticut's state energy and environmental regulator is liable for the hostile work environment that a Black employee endured before and after he claimed that he found a noose near his workstation in June 2018, a federal jury has found.

  • February 20, 2024

    Tennis Organization Found Negligent In Pro's Sexual Assault

    A Florida federal judge has sided with tennis pro Kylie McKenzie, finding that the U.S. Tennis Association did not do enough to monitor her coach Anibal Aranda, who sexually assaulted her.

  • February 20, 2024

    SEIU Local Beats Cleaner's Race Bias Suit At 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit declined Tuesday to revive a race bias suit from a Hispanic office cleaner who said her union unlawfully failed to press a grievance about her workload, saying the worker hadn't shown that prejudice influenced the union's decision making.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Wade Into CSX Medical Leave Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected former CSX Transportation employees' push for review of a Fourth Circuit ruling that ended their suit claiming they were unlawfully fired for requesting medical leave.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-IBM Workers Can't Get Justices To Tackle Age Bias Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned away a group of ex-IBM workers' bid for review of a Second Circuit ruling that said they had to pursue age bias claims in arbitration rather than court, despite their argument that the decision conflicted with high court precedent.

  • February 20, 2024

    Engineer Can't Get High Court Look At Service Dog ADA Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Tuesday to review a disability bias suit from a Union Pacific train engineer, leaving in place an Eighth Circuit ruling that said the company wasn't required to let the military veteran bring a service dog to work to help cope with PTSD.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justice Alito Rips 'Dangerous' Denial Of Admissions Case

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito slammed his colleagues' refusal to wade into a dispute over a Virginia high school's use of race in admissions decisions Tuesday, calling a Fourth Circuit decision upholding the policy "patently incorrect and dangerous" and the high court's willingness to let it stand "hard to understand."

Expert Analysis

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

    Author Photo

    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

    Author Photo

    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Protecting Vulnerable Workers

    Author Photo

    It's meaningful that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's strategic enforcement plan prioritizes protecting vulnerable workers, particularly as the backlash to workplace racial equity and diversity, equity and inclusion programs continues to unfold, says Dariely Rodriguez at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

    Author Photo

    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Compliance Tips For Employers Facing An Aggressive EEOC

    Author Photo

    This year, the combination of an aggressive U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a renewed focus on large-scale recruiting and hiring claims, and the injection of the complicated landscape of AI in the workplace means employers should be prepared to defend, among other things, their use of technology during the hiring process, say attorneys at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

    Author Photo

    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

    Author Photo

    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

    Author Photo

    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preserving Legal System Access

    Author Photo

    The track records of and public commentary from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission leaders — including two recently confirmed Democratic appointees — can provide insight into how the agency may approach access to justice priorities, as identified in its latest strategic enforcement plan, says Aniko Schwarcz at Cohen Milstein.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

    Author Photo

    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

    Author Photo

    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

    Author Photo

    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • Vaccine Accommodation Suits Show Risk Of Blanket Policies

    Author Photo

    A recent federal class action alleging Tyson Foods inappropriately applied a one-size-fits-all response to Arkansas employees seeking religious COVID-19 vaccine exemptions, with similar suits going back to 2022, should remind employers to individually consider every worker request for a religious accommodation, say Christopher Pardo and Elizabeth Sherwood at Hunton.