Labor

  • April 02, 2024

    Philly Uber Class Action Atty Heads To Lichten & Liss-Riordan

    One of the attorneys representing a proposed class of Philadelphia Uber drivers in their wage suit against the company left the Steel City's Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti LLP for the new New Jersey office of Lichten & Liss-Riordan PC, his co-counsel in the ride-hailing case.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union, Workers Must Comply With Starbucks' Subpoenas

    Workers United and a fired Starbucks employee must comply with subpoenas seeking information about workers' sentiments toward the union at a Long Island cafe following the worker's termination, a New York magistrate judge ruled, finding no confidentiality concerns.

  • April 01, 2024

    Bankrupt Coal Co.'s Affiliates Beat $6.5B Union Pension Suit

    A bankrupt coal company's affiliates have dodged claims that they owe $6.5 billion to a union pension plan, with a Washington, D.C., federal judge holding that the plan's trustees lacked standing to sue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act because one trustee wasn't properly appointed.

  • April 01, 2024

    Right-Wing Personality Hit With Severance Charge At NLRB

    Conservative media personality Steven Crowder was hit with a National Labor Relations Board charge alleging he's leaning on an illegal separation agreement in a suit to stop an ex-producer from speaking out about him.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union Backs USPS In Bias Suit That Went To High Court

    A Christian postal worker who claimed he was unlawfully punished for seeking Sundays off should lose his religious bias case under the standard the U.S. Supreme Court set when it revived his case in 2023, a letter carriers union told a Pennsylvania federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Carlton Fields Adds Stearns Weaver Employment Pro In Fla.

    Carlton Fields PA has added a labor and employment attorney from Stearns Weaver Miller as of counsel in its Tampa office, the firm announced Monday.

  • April 01, 2024

    NLRB Awards Disputed Seattle Port Work To ILWU

    Workers represented by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union are entitled to perform certain work at a port terminal in Seattle, the National Labor Relations Board ruled, rejecting the International Association of Machinists' bid for its members to take on the work.

  • April 01, 2024

    NLRB Official Tosses OPEIU's Election Bid At Consulting Co.

    A National Labor Relations Board official denied a petition from an Office and Professional Employees International Union affiliate to hold an election to represent workers at a consulting firm, saying the characteristics of workers who would be included and excluded from the proposed bargaining unit aren't clearly delineated.

  • April 01, 2024

    UNITE HERE President Steps Down After 11 Years

    The president of UNITE HERE has stepped down after 11 years of leading a union that represents 300,000 workers, the union announced Monday.

  • April 01, 2024

    Littler Adds Longtime Home Builders Association Atty In DC

    Littler Mendelson PC has hired a more than 20-year veteran of the National Association of Home Builders' in-house legal department to bolster its expertise counseling employers on construction liability, regulatory compliance and related matters, the firm recently announced.

  • April 01, 2024

    With Suit, NJ City Looks To Clear The Air About Cops' Pot Use

    A New Jersey city's lawsuit demanding clarity over whether state or federal law governs off-duty pot use for cops could help cannabis and employment lawyers navigate a growing battle between workers' rights and workplace safety.

  • March 29, 2024

    SEIU Dodges Nursing Homes' Defamation Claim

    A New Jersey federal judge dismissed defamation and trade libel allegations by nursing home operators against a union and its affiliates in light of U.S. Supreme Court precedent, saying the unions' statements at the center of the claims are connected to a labor dispute.

  • March 29, 2024

    Why The NLRB Doesn't Hold Electronic Elections In 2024

    The National Labor Relations Board's representation election process remains analog in 2024 despite a series of pushes to lift a long-standing legislative bar on pursuing electronic voting. Here, Law360 explores the debate over e-voting at the NLRB.

  • March 29, 2024

    OSHA Finalizes Rule Letting Unions Join Job Site Inspections

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a final rule Friday broadening workers' right to choose who represents them during safety inspections, overwriting an old standard that required the representative to be a fellow employee and opening the door for outside representatives such as those from unions.

  • March 29, 2024

    NLRB Says Amazon Had Unlawful Off-Duty Access Rule

    Amazon violated federal labor law by maintaining a policy that restricted off-duty workers' access to a Kentucky facility, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Friday, saying the rule gave the company too much discretion over access and rejecting the company's claim that it quickly walked back the rule.

  • March 29, 2024

    Captive Audience Memo Order Must Stand, 5th Circ. Told

    The Fifth Circuit shouldn't revive staffing companies' First Amendment claim challenging a memo from the National Labor Relations Board's top prosecutor arguing that so-called captive audience meetings are illegal, the lead agency official argued, saying district courts lack jurisdiction to review the allegations over her guidance.

  • March 29, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: 9th Circ. Takes On Ministerial Exception

    In the coming two weeks, attorneys should watch for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a pair of cases involving the ministerial exception. Here's a look at those cases and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • March 29, 2024

    SEIU Unit Defends Dartmouth Men's Basketball Union Ruling

    The Service Employees International Union local that recently won a landmark election to represent the Dartmouth College men's basketball team defended a National Labor Relations Board official's decision to greenlight the election, saying the case fell within her jurisdiction under federal labor law's "strikingly" broad definition of employee.

  • March 29, 2024

    NY Forecast: Ex-Worker Wants Sanctions Against Clothing Co.

    In the coming week, a New York federal judge will hear arguments over whether to issue sanctions against a clothing store for not responding to discovery requests in a lawsuit brought by a former sales associate who claims she was unlawfully denied overtime and minimum wage.

  • March 28, 2024

    Union Permitted MTA's Drug Test In Rep's Firing Suit, Judge Says

    A former New York electrical worker and union rep can't sue the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for firing him after a return-to-work drug test found evidence of marijuana use, as the union never raised the alarm about such drug tests before, a New York federal judge has ruled.

  • March 28, 2024

    NLRB Gets 1st Backing Of Starbucks Order In Circuit Court

    A split D.C. Circuit panel on Thursday enforced a National Labor Relations Board order finding Starbucks violated federal labor law by barring a worker from passing out union pins, marking the first time a federal appeals court has weighed in on a board decision against the coffee giant.

  • March 28, 2024

    Former Prison Contractor Must Pay $112K, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday affirmed a National Labor Relations Board decision ordering a former Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor and a Michigan halfway house to pay around $112,000 to two fired workers, supporting the agency's conclusion that the entities are liable for back pay.

  • March 28, 2024

    4 Takeaways As Hollywood Asks For AI Deepfakes Laws

    Deepfakes have ceased to live solely in the world of science fiction, and their proliferation has already presented disturbing examples of a distorted reality — from phony robocalls by politicians to bogus celebrity nudes.

  • March 28, 2024

    Starbucks' 10(j) Push Just 'Semantics,' AFL-CIO Tells Justices

    The AFL-CIO backed the National Labor Relations Board on Thursday in Starbucks' case at the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to unify the standards courts apply to the agency's injunction bids, saying the courts all use effectively the same test, even if some apply more or different factors than others.

  • March 28, 2024

    NLRB Judge Finds Buffalo Starbucks Firings Illegal

    Starbucks violated federal labor law by constructively discharging a former barista in Buffalo, New York, who is now a union spokesperson, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, while dismissing other unfair labor practice allegations against the coffee chain involving cut hours and failure to negotiate over discipline.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Lessons After 2023's Successful Labor Strikes

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    Following recent historic strikes in the automotive, entertainment and health care industries, employers of all types can learn key insights about how unions may approach negotiations and strikes going forward, and nonunionized workplaces should anticipate a drive for increased union membership, say Lenny Feigel and Mark Neuberger at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • Employers Should Review Training Repayment Tactics

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    State and federal examination of employee training repayment agreements has intensified, and with the potential for this tool to soon be severely limited, employers should review their options, including pivoting to other retention strategies, says Aaron Vance at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Extra NLRB Risks To Consider From Joint Employer Rule Edit

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s return to a broad definition of “joint employer” will expose companies — even those with only theoretical control of their outside consultants, contractors or franchise workers — to increased labor obligations and risks, further escalating their already expanding National Labor Relations Act liabilities, says William Kishman at Squire Patton.

  • AI At Work: Safety And NLRA Best Practices For Employers

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    There are many possible legal ramifications associated with integrating artificial intelligence tools and solutions into workplaces, including unionized workplaces' employer obligations under the National Labor Relations Act, and health and safety issues concerning robots and AI, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Employers Can Navigate NLRB's Pro-Employee Shift

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent decisions and general counsel memos mark the strong beginning of a trend toward greater pro-employee protections, so employers should proactively engage in risk management by revisiting their handbook policies accordingly, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Justices' Coming Fisheries Ruling May Foster NLRA Certainty

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court’s forthcoming decision in the Loper Bright v. Raimondi commercial fisheries' case overrules judicial deference to federal agencies' legal interpretations, it could carry over to the National Labor Relations Board's vacillating interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act, bringing a measure of predictability to the board’s administration of the law, says Corey Franklin at FordHarrison.

  • Aviation Watch: When Are Pilots Too Old To Fly?

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    A recent move by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise the mandatory retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 has reignited a decades-long debate — but this issue is best addressed through collective bargaining between carriers and pilots, rather than through legislation, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 2 NLRB Rulings On Unilateral Changes Are Bad News For Cos.

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent rulings in Wendt and Tecnocap on unilateral changes to employment terms shift bargaining leverage away from companies, but certain considerations can help employers navigate a contractual hiatus and negotiations for a first union contract, says Henry Morris Jr. at ArentFox Schiff.

  • NY Co-Ops Must Avoid Pitfalls When Navigating Insurance

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    In light of skyrocketing premiums, tricky exclusions and dwindling options, New York cooperative corporations must carefully review potential contractors' insurance policies in order to secure full protection, as even seemingly minor contractor jobs can carry significant risk due to New York labor laws, says Eliot Zuckerman at Smith Gambrell.

  • What Employers Face As NLRB Protects More Solo Protests

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    Given the National Labor Relations Board’s recent decision in Miller Plastics to implement a broader standard for when it will protect individual protests, employers must be careful to not open themselves to unfair labor practice claims when disciplining employees with personal gripes, says Mohamed Barry at Fisher Phillips.

  • USW Ruling Highlights Successor Liability In Bankruptcy Sale

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    A Delaware federal court's recent decision in United Steelworkers v. Braeburn is important for potential asset purchasers in Section 363 bankruptcy sales as it found the purchaser was subject to obligations under the National Labor Relations Act notwithstanding language in the sale approval order transferring the debtor's assets free and clear of successor liability, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Starbucks 'Memphis 7' Ruling Shows Retaliation Is A Bad Idea

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    Starbucks’ unsuccessful attempts to quash unionization by retaliating against organizing employees — illustrated by the Sixth Circuit's recent backing of an order that forced the company to rehire seven pro-union workers in Memphis, Tennessee — demonstrates why employers should eschew hard-line tactics and instead foster genuine dialogue with their workforce, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

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