More Employment Coverage

  • April 15, 2024

    McDonald's, Workers Battle Over Future Of No-Poach Case

    Workers suing McDonald's over its past use of no-poach provisions in franchise agreements have told an Illinois federal court the fast food chain is trying to slow down the case after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up its appeal.

  • April 15, 2024

    Allstate Asks Court To Order Takedown Of 'Smear' Posts

    Allstate asked a Colorado federal judge to order a former independent contractor to remove false statements on his website accusing the insurer of selling customers' personal information to criminals, arguing it has been irreparably injured and that the defendant has signaled he has no plans to stop his smear campaign.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tennis Coach Awarded $2.9M For Defamation In Title IX Suit

    A Quincy University tennis coach has been awarded $2.9 million at the close of a jury trial in Illinois federal court on his counterclaims that a former star recruit spread rumors that he had had sexual relations with a female student tennis player.

  • April 15, 2024

    Security Co. Faces Trial Over Poorly Trained Guards In Kabul

    Allegations that an international security company defrauded the U.S. government by skimping mandatory refresher training for guards protecting diplomatic sites in Afghanistan will be heard at trial after a Georgia federal judge refused to throw out a former supervisor's whistleblower suit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware justices mulled whether one Chancery Court vice chancellor properly voided four company bylaws — just as another vice chancellor voided one more. Fights among Truth Social investors continued, and shareholders launched new cases involving Macy's, United Airlines, and Clayton Dubilier & Rice LLC and Stone Point Capital LLC.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Medical Co. GC's Suit Against Loeb & Loeb Gets Trimmed

    A Colorado federal court has narrowed a lawsuit by a former medical device company's in-house attorney against Loeb & Loeb LLP and an ex-firm attorney for pursuing claims on behalf of the business alleging that he stole its trade secrets.

  • April 15, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Must Turn Over Amex Info In Firing Suit

    One of the pair of married former McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP executives accused of jointly stealing millions from the firm has prevailed on a bid for access to credit card statements from several firm leaders in her gender discrimination countersuit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pittsburgh University Associate GC Returns To Littler

    Littler Mendelson PC has rehired a former associate, who left the firm to join her alma mater as its associate general counsel more than a decade ago, the firm announced Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Adds Benefits Pro In Ga. From Union Pacific

    An employee benefits and executive compensation attorney has moved to private practice at Ballard Spahr LLP after spending more than a decade in-house at Union Pacific Railroad.

  • April 15, 2024

    Bomb Dog Trainer Links Cancer To Job In Benefits Denial Suit

    A Massachusetts state police trooper says he was diagnosed with cancer after being exposed to hazardous materials while training an explosives-detection dog at Logan Airport, according to a suit seeking line of duty injury benefits.

  • April 12, 2024

    Illinois Firm, Ex-Partner Resolve $2.4M Client-Poaching Suit

    An Illinois insurance defense law firm and a former partner have settled a nearly six-year suit alleging the attorney poached clients while leaving the firm in 2016, with both sides agreeing to dismiss claims the lawyer caused $2.4 million in damages to his former employer.

  • April 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owner Cops To Causing IRS $2.8M Tax Loss

    A Massachusetts construction company owner pled guilty to running an "off-the-books" cash payroll scheme that cost the federal government $2.8 million in tax losses, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • April 11, 2024

    Wells Fargo Wants Ex-CEO's $34M Back-Pay Suit Tossed

    Wells Fargo & Co. has asked a California state court to throw out a lawsuit filed by former CEO Timothy Sloan that seeks $34 million in compensation he alleges was wrongfully withheld from him, a payout the bank maintains it doesn't owe.

  • April 11, 2024

    State Rules Can't 'Obliterate' Federal Rights, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court must clarify that states are categorically prohibited from requiring plaintiffs to exhaust local administrative remedies before pursuing claims that state officials violated federal rights, several Alabamans told the court Thursday, warning that state prerequisites obliterate federal rights.

  • April 11, 2024

    Judge Calls Out Colo. For Limiting Prisoner Calls With Attys

    A Colorado state judge on Thursday said the state's prisons seemed to be imposing "draconian" limits on virtual calls between prisoners and their lawyers, telling officials to figure out how to do more for those seeking to join a proposed class action accusing the state of using them for slave labor.

  • April 11, 2024

    Hospitals Responsible For Contract ER Docs, Justices Say

    Washington state's high court ruled on Thursday that hospitals may be held liable for alleged neglectfulness of contracted doctors working in their emergency rooms, reviving negligence claims against the medical center brought by the estate of a woman killed by a flesh-eating disease that ER caregivers allegedly failed to diagnose.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Atlanta Worker Says City's Missing Docs Merits Sanctions

    Counsel for a former city of Atlanta department head who says she was fired after blowing the whistle on failures in its immigrant outreach services urged a Georgia federal judge on Thursday to hit the city with sanctions for reportedly destroying communications related to her termination.

  • April 11, 2024

    Mich. Justices To Hear Ex-Prosecutor's Whistleblower Appeal

    The Michigan Supreme Court agreed Wednesday to hold oral arguments in the appeal of a former assistant county prosecutor who claims her former boss retaliated against her for speaking up about a plea bargain she believed was unlawful.

  • April 11, 2024

    Medtronic Can't Ditch Ex-Sales Rep's Retaliation Claim

    Medical device maker Medtronic can't avoid a whistleblower retaliation claim by a former sales rep who says he was pushed out after reporting what he suspected to be a kickback scheme to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a federal judge said Wednesday.

  • April 11, 2024

    6th Circ. Orders Redo In Brokerage's Trade Secrets Row

    The Sixth Circuit ordered an Ohio district court to take another look at its ruling that a team of insurance brokerage's workers who defected for a competitor must comply with non-compete terms, reasoning that the lower court referenced standards for the injunction, but didn't actually consider them. 

  • April 10, 2024

    No Retrial Over NC Farm Worker's $2.5M Severed Foot Verdict

    A North Carolina farm failed in its bid for a new trial following a $2.5 million verdict against it, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, as a worker who lost his foot to a grain silo auger had enough evidence to support the award.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Art Institutes Execs Want Insurers To Avert $336M Suit

    Former executives of a holding company that bought now-defunct for-profit colleges Argosy University, South University and The Art Institutes asked an Ohio federal court to force excess insurers to settle receivership claims before the pair are formally accused of leaving a $336 million debt in their wake.

  • April 10, 2024

    Disney Defends Right To Fire 'Star Wars' Actor Over X Posts

    The Walt Disney Co. and Lucasfilm Ltd. asked a California federal judge to toss Gina Carano's claims that she was unlawfully fired from "The Mandalorian" for her social media posts, arguing they have a constitutional right as artistic creators to decide which actors to employ to express their artistic messages.

  • April 10, 2024

    CFTC Names New Watchdog After Whistleblower Allegations

    The Commodity Futures Trading Commission announced Wednesday that it has appointed the Federal Election Commission's inspector general to head its own independent watchdog office, following allegations his CFTC predecessor failed to protect whistleblowers within the agency.

  • April 10, 2024

    Union Pacific Can't Duck Biometric Privacy Lawsuit

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday again refused to dismiss a third amended complaint claiming that Union Pacific violated the state's biometric privacy law when it collected truck drivers' fingerprints without their informed consent, rejecting several new arguments raised by the railroad in its bid to ditch the suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • NCAA Proposal Points To A New NIL Compensation Frontier

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    Although NCAA President Charlie Baker's recent proposal for Division I institutions to pay student-athletes for name, image and likeness licensing deals is unlikely to pass in its current form, it shows that direct compensation for student-athletes is a looming reality — and member institutions should begin preparing in earnest, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Int'l Student-Athlete Law Would Change The NIL Game

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    Recently proposed legislation to allow international student-athletes the opportunity to profit from their name, image and likeness without violating their F-1 nonimmigrant student visa status represents a pivotal step in NIL policy, and universities must assess and adapt their approaches to accommodate unique immigration concerns, say attorneys at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Hoopers In NCAA Suit Respark Eligibility Framework Debate

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    A decision by two brothers involved in a recent antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA — to play college basketball rather than go professional after graduating from the Overtime Elite league — has aimed the spotlight on what exactly the NCAA deems permissible compensation under its current framework, say Brady Foster and Dan Lust at Moritt Hock.

  • Practical Insights For Employers Using AI

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    Keeping up with the relentless pace and evolution of regulatory and legislative artificial intelligence in 2023 has been a challenge for employers, but there are four takeaways employers using AI in the workplace should consider by looking toward developments like the European Union's AI Act and President Joe Biden's AI executive order, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • 5 Steps For Healthcare Companies After Biden's AI Order

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    Rather than simply monitoring for the issuance of agency guidelines on artificial intelligence in the wake of President Joe Biden's October executive order, health and life sciences companies should take action now and begin building internal operational and technical infrastructures designed to govern the use of AI, says Joy Sharp at Faegre Drinker.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

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