More Employment Coverage

  • March 28, 2024

    White House Directs Agencies To Install AI Risk Safeguards

    The White House on Thursday issued a new directive requiring all federal agencies to address safety and civil rights risks in their use and procurement of artificial intelligence in an array of settings, including conducting screenings at airports and making decisions affecting Americans' healthcare, employment and housing.

  • March 28, 2024

    Apple Says Ex-Engineer Leaked To 'Homeboy,' Other Journos

    Apple Inc. is accusing a former engineer of leaking sensitive information about its business practices, internal policies and products to employees at other technology companies as well as at least three journalists for national publications — including one saved in his phone as "Homeboy" — in a suit in California state court.

  • March 28, 2024

    Special Master Suggests Denying Bid To Toss Gaming IP Row

    A special master in the Northern District of Georgia has recommended denying an attempt to throw out patent infringement and trade secret claims that New York-based sports tech company Vetnos LLC has lodged against Atlanta-based rival PrizePicks.

  • March 28, 2024

    NCAA Argues Certification Of Alston Payout Class Too Complex

    The NCAA and the Power 5 conferences have told a California federal judge that the "highly varied and diverse ways" schools compensated athletes after the 2021 Alston Supreme Court decision make it implausible to certify the class suing for past compensation — saying plaintiffs have chosen to "simply ignore all of this complexity.''

  • March 28, 2024

    NC Atty Says Career Coaching Business Stiffed Him On Pay

    A North Carolina lawyer said this week that he hasn't been paid for his work at a career coaching business in which he owns a minority stake after he discovered the company was bleeding funds and rife with mismanagement, according to an amended state business court complaint.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal's Jobless Pay Ruling Correct, Del. Justices Told

    Delaware opposes a former Morris James LLP paralegal's bid for the state's Supreme Court to revive his attempt to collect a year's worth of unemployment benefits, arguing a lower court correctly upheld denial of pay after he settled whistleblower claims against the firm.

  • March 27, 2024

    ​​​​​​​CSX Can't End DOL's Improper Retirement Plan Fee Suit

    A Florida federal judge backed a magistrate judge's recommendation Wednesday that the court knock down CSX Transportation Inc.'s bid to dismiss a suit alleging it mismanaged its retirement plan fees, discarding the company's concerns that the report made improper legal conclusions.

  • March 27, 2024

    COVID Prompted Equity Plan Edit, Raytheon Tells Chancery

    Raytheon Technologies Corp. amended employee compensation plans in early 2020 to mitigate "head-spinning unprecedented volatility" from the COVID-19 pandemic, and a shareholder's allegations that directors acted in bad faith by failing to seek stockholder approval should be dismissed, the aerospace company told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Meet The Attys In Ex-Seton Hall President's Retaliation Suit

    Law360 Pulse took an in-depth look at the employment lawyers and heavyweight defense attorneys litigating Seton Hall University’s ex-president's whistleblower case against the New Jersey university.

  • March 27, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NY Law Clerk's Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit Wednesday agreed with a New York federal district court's dismissal of a suit brought by a former New York law clerk accusing the state's judicial system of covering for a judge she says sexually harassed her, holding that it lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Unsure Uber Can Dodge Suit Over Slain Driver

    A pair of Ninth Circuit judges seemed to question Tuesday if Uber Technologies Inc. could avoid liability after a driver was murdered in a carjacking, with one judge asking if the law needed to catch up with new technology in a case where the company controlled information about the identity of riders.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ohio Health Staffing Co. Settles Visa Fraud Probe For $9.25M

    An Ohio healthcare staffing company has agreed to pay a $9.25 million penalty to resolve criminal and civil investigations that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting into its visa sponsorship program over what the firm's chief executive officer called "problematic conduct in our visa process."

  • March 26, 2024

    Boeing Can't Exit Wash. Worker's Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge has declined to throw out a lawsuit accusing Boeing of exposing a factory worker to chemicals that caused birth defects in his child, after casting doubt last month on the company's assertion it had no legal duty to protect employees' future children from foreseeable harm.

  • March 26, 2024

    NC Software Execs Ask To Raze Payroll Tax Fraud Conviction

    Two former software executives found guilty of failing to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in employment taxes have sought to wipe out their conviction based on what they allege was insufficient evidence presented by the government at trial.

  • March 25, 2024

    Boeing Called Out For 'Circular' Logic In Love-Triangle Murder

    A Washington federal judge suggested on Monday that it would be unfair to let Being avoid liability in the early stages of a case involving a love-triangle among workers that ended in murder, calling the argument against allowing litigation to move forward "circular."

  • March 25, 2024

    Judge Finalizes Ban On Taking $540M IP Fight To China

    An Illinois federal judge granted Motorola's request to stop Hytera from pursuing a non-infringement case against it in China, saying Monday that she would also start contempt proceedings in the case.

  • March 25, 2024

    Gorsuch Irked At Having To Decide $3K Furlough Dispute

    Justice Neil Gorsuch expressed incredulity that the U.S. Supreme Court has to resolve a Pentagon employee's $3,000 dispute stemming from a furlough decision, remarking Monday on the "extraordinary" lengths the government has gone to in fighting the case.

  • March 25, 2024

    Tesla, Travelers Settle Wrongful Death Coverage Dispute

    Tesla and a Travelers unit reached an agreement in the parties' dispute over coverage of a wrongful death lawsuit involving a construction worker at a company factory in Austin, shortly after a Texas federal judge declined to strike three of the insurers' defenses.

  • March 25, 2024

    Prior Deal Bars Issues-Only Classes In NCAA Football MDL

    An Illinois federal judge has denied a bid by former NCAA football players for issue-only classes in multidistrict litigation over concussion injuries, saying a settlement from a prior MDL specifically prohibits issue-only classes.

  • March 25, 2024

    Jury Hands Mortgage Co. $73K Win In Trade Secrets Fight

    An Ohio federal jury has found that Revolution Mortgage owes just over $73,700 to competitor Equity Resources in a case where Equity accused its rival of misappropriation of trade secrets.

  • March 25, 2024

    NC High Court Vacates Workers' Comp For Weight Loss Surgery

    A divided North Carolina Supreme Court has adopted a test for determining when someone is entitled to workers' compensation for treatment related to their workplace injury and, in doing so, reversed a ruling finding a preschool must pay for an employee's weight loss surgery.

  • March 22, 2024

    Activists Press Full 5th Circ. To Nix Nasdaq Diversity Rule

    Conservative groups opposing a requirement that Nasdaq-listed companies publicly disclose board diversity data are pressing the full bench of the Fifth Circuit to declare the rule unconstitutional, arguing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's involvement in the rulemaking process transforms the requirement into an unconstitutional restraint on free speech. 

  • March 22, 2024

    Fired CFO Of Conn. Gas Co. Seeks $5.6M From Sale

    The former chief financial officer of Hocon Gas Inc., a propane and heating oil company serving three Northeastern states, says he was fired for dubious reasons after demanding his share of distributions ahead of a planned sale of the company and its affiliates, in a $5.6 million lawsuit in Connecticut state court.

  • March 22, 2024

    DraftKings' Suit Is 'Character Assassination,' Former VP Says

    A former DraftKings executive picked apart a trade secret suit brought against him in Massachusetts federal court by his ex-employer, saying it's an attempt to "torch his reputation" with questionable evidence that also demonstrates the company's practice of smearing employees who leave for better opportunities.

  • March 22, 2024

    'Love Is Blind' Contestant's Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A California judge on Friday held that claims against Netflix from a "Love Is Blind" contestant alleging she was matched with a violent drug addict must be sent to arbitration after finding that the arbitrability of the contract in question is not for the court to decide.

Expert Analysis

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Unlocking Value In Carve-Out M&A Transactions

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    Some of the largest mergers and acquisitions in 2023 were carve-out transactions, and despite their unique intricacies and challenges, these transactions offer both buyers and sellers the opportunity to generate outsized returns in an otherwise vigorously competitive landscape, when carefully planned and diligently executed, say Kevin Crews and Rami Totari at Kirkland.

  • Key Employer Takeaways From USCIS' H-1B Visa Proposal

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    There are several steps employers can take, like reviewing job descriptions and assessing cap-exempt eligibility, to be well positioned for the sweeping changes that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services proposes to implement next year to improve the H-1B visa program, say Brian Coughlin and Angelica Ochoa at Fisher Phillips.

  • Evaluating Calif. Law On Litigation During Arbitration Appeals

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    While a recently enacted California law makes it possible for cases to proceed to trial in state court even while appeal of an arbitration denial is pending, the legislation may be preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act and a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, says Benny Osorio at Signature Resolution.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Knicks Suit Shows Need For Leagues To Protect Big Data

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    The New York Knicks' recent lawsuit alleging a former employee took trade secrets to the Toronto Raptors shows sports leagues — both professional and amateur — should prepare for future litigation in this realm, given the growth of analytics and statistics in front offices, says Kevin Paule at Hill Ward Henderson.

  • Issues That Can Arise When Tech Founders Leave CEO Role

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    More founders of venture-backed technology companies are transitioning out of the CEO role earlier than before, which can lead to unanticipated consequences if parties haven't carefully reviewed the company's certificate of incorporation, stockholders' agreements and the founder's employment agreement, say Alex Leibowitz and Megan Monson at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • What Whistleblowing Trends Mean For Securities Litigation

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    A recent survey on whistleblowing-related topics suggests several valuable lessons for companies to consider regarding securities and shareholder litigation, and underscores the need to implement and advertise robust whistleblowing policies to employees, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • How Cos. Can Mitigate IP Risks After NY Labor Law Updates

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    A recent New York labor law amendment limits the permissible scope of invention assignment agreements, leading to potential intellectual property risks for New York-based employers, which they can reduce through several steps, including the reevaluation of assignment provisions in employment agreements, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Get Ready For Calif.'s Expanded Restrictive Covenant Ban

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    California recently passed the second of two new laws that together largely prohibit restrictive covenants, even for certain out-of-state employers — and since there's not much time before the statutes become effective, now is the time for companies to revisit how their confidential information will be protected, says Russell Beck at Beck Reed.

  • Class Action Defense: Don't Give Up On Bristol-Myers Squibb

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    Federal appellate court decisions in the six years since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb show that it's anyone's ballgame in class action jurisdictional arguments, so defendants are encouraged to consider carefully whether, where and when arguing lack of specific personal jurisdiction may be advantageous, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Parsing Maryland's Earned Wage Access Products Guidance

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    The Maryland Office of Financial Regulation's new guidance on earned wage access products intended to provide clarity under the state's law may be confusing, but ultimately means one thing — you are either the employer's service provider helping offer an employee benefit, or you are not and therefore considered a lender, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

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