Employment UK

  • February 21, 2024

    Face Mask May Have Triggered PTSD, Tribunal Rules

    A school technician has revived his disability discrimination case after an appellate panel ruled in a decision published Wednesday there was proof to back up his concerns that being forced to wear a face mask during the pandemic would trigger his post-traumatic stress disorder. 

  • February 21, 2024

    Oxford University Academics Win Employee Status Challenge

    Two University of Oxford academics count as having been employed by the institution even though it hired them on temporary contracts designed to dodge an employer-employee relationship, a tribunal ruled in a decision made public Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Temp Workers Entitled To Dismissal Reasons, ECJ Rules

    When employers fire temporary workers they must tell them why, because not doing so could prevent them from legally challenging their dismissal, The European Union's top court said Tuesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pitmans Can't Strike Out Negligent Pension Advice Claim

    Pitmans Solicitors, BDB Pitmans' predecessor, has failed to strike out allegations that it gave former clients negligent advice on a pension scheme, after a London court found Wednesday that it is "clearly in the interests of justice" that the case proceed against it.

  • February 21, 2024

    Addison Lee Settles With Lead Claimants In Drivers' Claim

    Minicab giant Addison Lee has settled a long-running dispute with its drivers over their status as workers and their related employee protections such as holiday pay and minimum wage, with lawyers for the drivers hailing the settlement on Wednesday as a win for gig economy workers.

  • February 21, 2024

    Insurer QBE Narrows Gender Pay Gap, But Bonuses An Issue

    QBE UK has said the gender pay gap has fallen across its organization and is below the wider gap seen in the insurance industry, despite the gender bonus divide remaining "an issue" at the insurer.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pension Climate Reporting Has 'Failed To Shift UK Investment'

    The government's climate reporting regime for pensions providers has failed to produce a meaningful shift in investment behavior away from fossil fuels, experts warned lawmakers on Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Royal Parks Fights Contractor-Staff Comparison In Pay Appeal

    Britain's Royal Parks argued Wednesday that contracted cleaners cannot compare themselves with its directly employed staff, as it fought the contractors' case in the Court of Appeal that their lower rate of pay amounted to race discrimination.

  • February 21, 2024

    Finance Firms Shuttered For £3M Loan Notes Fraud

    Two financial firms have been wound up after misleading investors into putting at least £3 million ($3.8 million) into an unprotected bond scheme, according to the Insolvency Service.

  • February 21, 2024

    2 UK Law Firms Failed To Pay Minimum Wage, Gov't Says

    Two law firms have compensated staff after paying them thousands of pounds less than they should have under minimum wage regulations, the government has said.

  • February 21, 2024

    Burges Salmon Leads Insurer's £11M Spar Pension Deal

    Insurer Just Group said on Wednesday that it has completed an £11 million ($13.8 million) pension buy-in transaction with Spar (UK) Ltd., in a deal guided by Burges Salmon LLP.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sodexo OK To Sack Prison Officer Over 'Torrent Of Abuse'

    An employment tribunal has ruled that prison management company Sodexo rightly fired a prison officer for gross misconduct after a prisoner accused him of a "torrent of abuse."

  • February 20, 2024

    Fire Brigade Workers Fight To Overturn Pensions Loss

    The firefighters union urged an appeals court on Tuesday to overturn its failed bid to prove that HM Treasury unfairly distributed costs when compensating workers who had received unlawful pensions in the past, arguing that the policy caused sex, age and race discrimination.

  • February 20, 2024

    Firm Faces Claim From Cleaner Fired For Eating Leftovers

    A cleaner is planning to sue a London law firm and its private cleaning contractor after bosses allegedly fired her for eating a tuna sandwich that lawyers had left behind after a meeting, a trade union has said.

  • February 20, 2024

    Aspiring Judge Loses Race Bias Case Over Failed Application

    An Asian-British solicitor has lost his case accusing a High Court judge of downgrading his application for a judicial post because he wasn't white, with a tribunal concluding that his failure had "nothing whatsoever" to do with his race.

  • February 20, 2024

    Uni Unfairly Fired Lecturer But Fair Dismissal Was Inevitable

    A tribunal has awarded a senior lecturer one week's salary in damages after ruling that his university unfairly sacked him following a procedural redundancy failure but would have fairly dismissed him a week later.

  • February 20, 2024

    Royal Parks Contractors Appeal For Equal Pay With Staff

    Britain's Royal Parks racially discriminated against its cleaners by approving a contract that paid them less than its employees, a group of workers argued at an appeals court Tuesday in a case that could force employers across the U.K. to revisit similar arrangements.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pension Transfers Could Cost Savers £70K In Retirement

    Pensioners-to-be in the U.K. could lose about £70,000 ($88,500) in retirement when transferring their pension pot due to a lack of understanding of key information such as financial charges, according to recent research.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pension Numbers Shrink As Funding Grows, Watchdog Says

    The number of defined benefit pension schemes in the U.K. has decreased by 2% since 2022, according to a report published Tuesday by The Pensions Regulator that shows that funding levels for retirement savings plans are continuing to improve.

  • February 20, 2024

    Soccer Club Unfairly Axed Coach Over N-Word Allegations

    A top-tier English soccer club unfairly sacked a part-time coach after mishandling its investigation into allegations that he said a racist slur to a colleague, a tribunal has ruled.

  • February 19, 2024

    Barrister Disbarred For Pocketing £149K In VAT Payments

    A barrister was ordered to be disbarred on Monday after he admitted to receiving value-added tax on his professional fees despite not being registered for it, with a tribunal saying he acted dishonestly and that his behavior amounted to "serious misconduct."

  • February 19, 2024

    Sex Offense Suspect Can't Get Evidence From BBC

    An anonymous, internationally known figure under investigation for alleged serious sexual offenses cannot use a witness statement from the BBC to persuade prosecutors not to charge him, a London court ruled on Monday.

  • February 19, 2024

    UK Launches Crackdown On 'Fire And Rehire' Tactics

    Employers could face sanctions for firing staff and rehiring them on worse contracts under new rules that will strictly police the practice, the U.K. government said Monday.

  • February 19, 2024

    Ex-M&C Saatchi Finance Manager Loses Home-Working Claim

    A tribunal has rejected a claim by a former M&C Saatchi finance manager that the advertising agency forced her to quit by asking her to return to the office, ruling that the company's demand should not have destroyed their relationship.

  • February 19, 2024

    FCA Secures Bankruptcy Order Against Pension Promoters

    The Financial Conduct Authority has said it has secured bankruptcy orders against a pair of pensions promoters in a move to cover a £10.7 million ($13.5 million) restitution order for creditors.

Expert Analysis

  • Pension Scheme Ruling Elucidates Conversion Issues

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    In Newell Trustees v. Newell Rubbermaid UK Services, the High Court recently upheld a pension plan's conversion of final salary benefits to money purchase benefits, a welcome conclusion that considered several notable issues, such as how to construe pension deeds and when contracts made outside scheme rules can determine benefits, say Ian Gordon and Jamie Barnett at Gowling.

  • Workplace Bullying Bill Implications For Employers And Execs

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    In light of the upcoming parliamentary debate on the Bullying and Respect at Work Bill, organizations should consider how a statutory definition of "workplace bullying" could increase employee complaints and how senior executives would be implicated if the bill becomes law, says Sophie Rothwell at Charles Russell.

  • Amazon's €32M Data Protection Fine Acts As Employer Caveat

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    The recent decision by French data privacy regulator CNIL to fine Amazon for excessive surveillance of its workers opens up a raft of potential employment law, data protection and breach of contract issues, and offers a clear warning that companies need coherent justification for monitoring employees, say Robert Smedley and William Richmond-Coggan at Freeths.

  • Employers Can 'Waive' Goodbye To Unknown Future Claims

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    The Scottish Court of Session's recent decision in Bathgate v. Technip Singapore, holding that unknown future claims in a qualifying settlement agreement can be waived, offers employers the possibility of achieving a clean break when terminating employees and provides practitioners with much-needed guidance on how future cases might be dealt with in court, says Natasha Nichols at Farrer & Co.

  • Why Investment In Battery Supply Chain Is Important For UK

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    The recently published U.K. battery strategy sets out the government’s vision for a globally competitive battery supply chain, and it is critical that the U.K. secures investment to maximize opportunities for economic prosperity and net-zero transition, say lawyers at Watson Farley & Williams.

  • Ruling Elucidates Tensions In Assessing Employee Disability

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    An employment tribunal's recent decision, maintaining that dermatitis was not a disability, but stress was, illustrates tensions in the interaction between statutory guidance on reasonable behavior modifications and Equality Act measures, says Suzanne Nulty at Weightmans.

  • ECJ Ruling Triggers Reconsiderations Of Using AI In Hiring

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    A recent European Court of Justice ruling, clarifying that the General Data Protection Regulation could apply to decisions made by artificial intelligence, serves as a warning to employers, as the use of AI in recruitment may lead to more discrimination claims, say Dino Wilkinson and James Major at Clyde & Co.

  • Supreme Court Ruling Is A Gift To Insolvency Practitioners

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    As corporate criminal liability is in sharp focus, the Supreme Court's recent decision in Palmer v. Northern Derbyshire Magistrates' Court that administrators are not company officers and should not be held liable under U.K. labor law is instructive in focusing on the substance and not merely the title of a person's role within a company, say lawyers at Greenberg Traurig.

  • More Remains To Be Done To Achieve Gender Parity In Law

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    Significant strides have been made over the years to improve gender diversity in the legal profession, but the pay gap, lack of workplace flexibility and uneven child care burden remain significant challenges to progress, says Caroline Green at Browne Jacobson.

  • Key Employer Lessons From 2023 Neurodiversity Case Uptick

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    The rise in neurodiversity cases in U.K. employment tribunals last year emphasizes the growing need for robust occupational health support, and that employers must acknowledge and adjust for individuals with disabilities in their workplaces to ensure compliance and foster a neurodiverse-friendly work environment, says Emily Cox at Womble Bond.

  • Pension Industry Should Monitor Evolving ESG Issues In 2024

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    ESG thinking in the pensions industry has substantially evolved from focusing on climate change and net-zero to including nature and social considerations, and formalizing governance processes — illustrating that, in 2024, continually monitoring ESG issues sits squarely within trustee fiduciary duties, says Liz Ramsaran at DWF.

  • 5 Key UK Employment Law Developments From 2023

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    Key employment law issues in 2023 suggest that topics such as trade union recognition for collective bargaining in the gig economy, industrial action and menopause discrimination will be at the top of the agenda for employers and employees in 2024, say Merrill April and Anaya Price at CM Murray.

  • Emerging Trends From A Busy Climate Litigation Year

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    Although many environmental cases brought in the U.K. were unsuccessful in 2023, they arguably clarified several relevant issues, such as climate rights, director and trustee obligations, and the extent to which claimants can hold the government accountable, illustrating what 2024 may have in store for climate litigation, say Simon Bishop and Patrick Kenny at Hausfeld.

  • 2024 Will Be A Busy Year For Generative AI And IP Issues

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    In light of increased litigation and policy proposals on balancing intellectual property rights and artificial intelligence innovation, 2024 is shaping up to be full of fast-moving developments that will have significant implications for AI tool developers, users of such tools and rights holders, say lawyers at Mishcon de Reya.

  • How Businesses Can Prepare For Cyber Resilience In 2024

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    With cybersecurity breaches one of the biggest threats to U.K. businesses and as legislation tightens, organizations should prioritize their external security measures in 2024 and mitigate risks by being well-informed on internal data protection procedures, says Kevin Modiri at Nelsons.

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