Employment

  • April 08, 2024

    Sex Life Had No Place In Sex Harassment Trial, 9th Circ. Told

    An ex-Behemoth worker asked the Ninth Circuit on Monday to order a new trial after a jury rejected his sexual harassment and hostile work environment suit against the video game company, arguing the district court erroneously allowed jurors to hear about his sex life and vulgar speech.

  • April 08, 2024

    Allstate Sues Ex-Agent For Post-Litigation 'Smear Campaign'

    Allstate Insurance Co. has alleged in Colorado federal court that a former independent contractor it previously sued for allegedly stealing trade secrets has since launched an online "smear campaign" to spread false claims that the company is selling its customers' sensitive personal data to criminals and that it flouted a court order in the earlier suit by posting confidential deposition excerpts.

  • April 08, 2024

    Red Robin Reaches $600K Deal To End EEOC Claims In Wash.

    Red Robin has agreed to pay $600,000 and bolster its anti-sexual harassment policies to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit alleging a line cook in Washington state retaliated against female co-workers for objecting to his offensive comments, according to a proposed consent decree filed in federal court in Seattle.

  • April 08, 2024

    H-2A Workers Want OK On $900K OT Deal With Va. Farms

    Two Mexican farmworkers are asking a Virginia federal court to greenlight their $900,000 settlement with an agricultural association and two farms that they say cheated temporary workers out of $2.5 million in overtime pay.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ford Motor Co. OT Claims Transferred To Michigan

    An Ohio federal judge sent a proposed collective action by a former Ford Motor Co. plant worker to the Eastern District of Michigan on Monday after the worker and the auto manufacturer said the case is better dealt with near Ford's headquarters in Detroit.

  • April 08, 2024

    High Court Creating DEI Headwinds, Colo. AG Says

    Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser said Monday that the state's major losses last year in cases involving gay rights and prosecuting threatening speech were part of what he views as a trend at the U.S. Supreme Court of hampering efforts to increase diversity, equity and inclusion.

  • April 08, 2024

    Workers Oppose X Corp.'s Bid To Stall $500M Severance Suit

    Two workers asked a California federal court to deny a request from X, formerly Twitter, to pause discovery in their suit alleging it stiffed employees on $500 million in severance pay when it conducted mass layoffs following Elon Musk's takeover, saying the move will create unnecessary delay.

  • April 08, 2024

    Teamsters Benefits Row Isn't Arbitrable, Sysco Tells 7th Circ.

    An Indiana federal judge correctly held that a Sysco distribution center in Indianapolis didn't have to arbitrate a dispute with a Teamsters local over workers' entitlement to early retirement benefits, the company has told the Seventh Circuit, asking the appellate court to uphold the judge's ruling. 

  • April 08, 2024

    Drexel Didn't Accommodate Exec's Disability, Suit Claims

    Drexel University was accused Monday of discrimination by an administrator, who claimed its chief operating officer refused her request to meet one-on-one ahead of a group meeting with a subordinate and that the group meeting be held via telephone instead of video.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-USPS Worker Can Proceed With Disability Suit

    An Illinois federal judge refused to toss an ex-worker's lawsuit against the U.S. Postal Service, saying she had enough evidence to get her claim that she was denied overtime because of a wrist injury before a jury, but failed to show that age discrimination was at play.

  • April 08, 2024

    8th Circ. Upholds NLRB's Broad Remedies Against Meat Co.

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday upheld a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a meat processor in Nebraska illegally bargained in bad faith with a United Food and Commercial Workers affiliate, backing the board's broad remedies order that included reimbursing the union for negotiating expenses.

  • April 08, 2024

    McMahon Sells Millions More In TKO Stock Amid Abuse Suit

    WWE's disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, continues to loosen his grip on the wrestling company he founded, most recently selling $311 million worth of stock in WWE's parent, according to a Monday securities filing.

  • April 08, 2024

    Conn. Worker Says Firing For Talking Wages Was Illegal

    A former employee of a company that designs and manufactures radiation detection devices accused the firm in Connecticut federal court of breaching state law by prohibiting him from discussing his pay with his colleagues and of firing him for telling a friend about receiving a raise.

  • April 08, 2024

    'Flagrant' $8.6M Embezzlement Scheme Nets 6-Year Sentence

    A former office manager who was caught stealing more than $8.6 million from the trucking logistics company where she worked was sentenced to six years in prison on Monday in Georgia federal court. 

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal Launches Whistleblower Suit Against NJ Firm

    An ex-paralegal at New Jersey personal injury law firm Brandon J. Broderick LLC says his former employer created an uncomfortable work place when he reported alleged ethical violations to management.

  • April 08, 2024

    Seyfarth Bolsters Dallas Shop With Hunton Employment Ace

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP has expanded the labor and employment department in its Dallas office after opening the office late last year, bringing on a former longtime Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP partner to serve as its founding L&E partner in the North Texas city, the firm announced on Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    Jackson Hewitt Preparers Want First OK On $10.8M Deal

    Former Jackson Hewitt Inc. workers have reached a $10.8 million settlement with their former employer over claims the company's franchisees entered into an anti-competitive no-poach agreement despite the provision being removed from the company's franchise agreements, according to a Friday motion.

  • April 08, 2024

    Doctors Say MSU Vax Mandate Suit Needs High Court Review

    Three doctors urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a case challenging Michigan State University's vaccine mandate after the Sixth Circuit backed the suit's dismissal, arguing that the circuit court should have applied a stricter standard when considering whether the government could interfere with patients' medical decisions.

  • April 08, 2024

    Male Worker Says Female Colleague's Grudge Got Him Fired

    A financial services firm abruptly fired a sales producer without any investigation after a female colleague who wanted him gone made false accusations about him, the producer said in a suit filed in Texas federal court.

  • April 05, 2024

    Sean Combs Named In Suit Alleging Yacht Sex Assault By Son

    Sean "Diddy" Combs and his son, Christian Combs, were sued Thursday in California state court by a woman alleging the younger Combs sexually assaulted her aboard a yacht while she was working as a stewardess, and that there is an audio recording of part of the incident.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Univ. Coach Says Sexual Orientation Led To Firing

    A University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley assistant tennis coach has accused the school in federal court of letting her go after a "sham investigation" because she is gay.

  • April 05, 2024

    Neb. Beef Seller Says No Proof It Joined Wage-Fixing Scheme

    A Colorado federal judge gave a Nebraska beef wholesaler another chance to petition for dismissal from a class action accusing it of participating in a meat industry wage-fixing scheme, after the company filed a motion that didn't follow the court's page limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Tesla Workers Skipped Breaks To Meet Quotas, Suit Says

    Two former warehouse workers hit Tesla with a proposed wage and hour class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging the electric carmaker violated labor laws by not providing sufficient break time, operating an illegal quota system and failing to pay all of their wages.

  • April 05, 2024

    Starbucks Tells Judge Union Dealings Aren't 'Mission Critical'

    Starbucks denied Friday that complying with federal labor law was "mission critical" to its business as it urged a Washington state judge to dismiss a shareholder suit accusing company leaders of union busting, which they say tanked Starbucks' reputation.

  • April 05, 2024

    NBC, Bravo Accused Of Racism By 'Vanderpump Rules' Alum

    "Vanderpump Rules" alumnus Faith Stowers sued NBC, Evolution Media and Bravo for discrimination and retaliation in California state court Friday, alleging she was threatened with legal action when she tried to speak up about the ill-treatment she suffered during taping, including racist slurs and having a knife brandished at her.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

    Author Photo

    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • Takeaways From NLRB Advice On 'Outside' Employment

    Author Photo

    Rebecca Leaf at Miles & Stockbridge examines a recent memo from the National Labor Relations Board’s Division of Advice that said it’s unlawful for employers to restrict secondary or outside employment, and explains what companies should know about the use of certain restrictive covenants going forward.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

    Author Photo

    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

    Author Photo

    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • What To Know About Employee Retention Credit Disclosures

    Author Photo

    Employers that filed potentially erroneous employee retention credit claims should take certain steps to determine whether the IRS’ voluntary disclosure program is a good fit and, if so, prepare a strong application before the window closes on March 22, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

    Author Photo

    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

    Author Photo

    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

    Author Photo

    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • What Workplace Violence Law Means For Texas Healthcare

    Author Photo

    While no federal laws address violence against healthcare workers, Texas has recently enacted statutory protections that take effect later this year — so facilities in the state should understand their new obligations under the law, and employers in other states would be wise to take notice as well, say attorneys at Bradley Arant.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

    Author Photo

    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

    Author Photo

    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

    Author Photo

    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

    Author Photo

    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!