Florida

  • May 16, 2024

    11th Circ. Denies Ayahuasca Church's Bid For Rehearing

    The Eleventh Circuit has refused to grant an en banc rehearing to a Florida church that wanted to use ayahuasca as a sacrament, leaving in place an appellate ruling that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration properly denied a religious exemption from federal law against the psychedelic substance.

  • May 16, 2024

    FCC To Pull Phone Co.'s Authorization To Operate In US

    The Federal Communications Commission said Thursday it plans to revoke a telecom company's authorization to operate in the U.S. after the business failed to comply with an agreement with federal agencies stemming from a security review.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Ga. Coach Says Earlier Race Suit Doesn't Bar Title VII Suit

    A former Georgia high school football coach, who alleged his contract was terminated because of his race, urged the Eleventh Circuit to revive his suit against the Valdosta City School District on Thursday, arguing the dismissal of an earlier suit against school board members does not bar this suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    11th Circ. Tries To Untangle Aftermath Of Judge's Early Exit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Thursday quizzed attorneys for rival breeders of disease-resistant shrimp about whether a $10 million trade-secrets jury verdict should be overturned after a federal magistrate judge presided over the trial's ending because a federal district judge had to catch a flight, with one of the panel judges saying the parties had been put "in a very difficult position."

  • May 16, 2024

    'Miami Mentor' Joins Goldberg Segalla As Partner

    Goldberg Segalla LLP is expanding its Miami team, bringing in a Clarke Silverglate PA commercial litigation defense attorney known as the "Miami Mentor" as a partner.

  • May 16, 2024

    Roche Freedman Gets Split Ruling On Witnesses In Atty's Suit

    A New York federal judge has issued a split decision on witness testimony in a dispute over the litigation boutique formerly called Roche Freedman.

  • May 16, 2024

    $5.5M Apotex Generic Drug Price-Fixing Deal Gets Initial OK

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave preliminary approval to yet another settlement in the sweeping generic drug price-fixing multidistrict litigation, this time signing off on pharmaceutical company Apotex's $5.5 million settlement with clinics, hospitals and independent pharmacies.

  • May 16, 2024

    Fla. Seeks To Halt Biden's ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    Florida urged a federal court to stop recently finalized regulations clarifying gender identity-based discrimination under the Affordable Care Act from taking effect, saying the new rules would force the state to abandon its health and safety laws or lose funding from the federal government.

  • May 16, 2024

    US Must Produce Emails Between IRS Managers, Docs Leaker

    The government must produce emails between Internal Revenue Service managers and a former contractor who leaked thousands of wealthy people's tax returns, a Florida federal judge has ordered, saying the materials are relevant to a billionaire's case accusing the agency of responsibility for the leak.

  • May 15, 2024

    Insurer Says Security Co. Not Covered For Nightclub Injuries

    A security services company is not owed coverage for three underlying personal injury lawsuits stemming from multiple shooting and stabbing incidents at a Florida gentlemen's club, an insurer told a New York federal court, stating its policies exclude coverage for injuries sustained at clubs and assault.

  • May 15, 2024

    Peru Ducks $154M Claim Over Seized Gold Shipments

    Peru has fended off a Miami-based gold trader's $154 million claim accusing the country of unlawfully seizing its gold shipments, after an international tribunal ruled Tuesday that it lacked jurisdiction and that the trader should be on the hook for all costs in the proceeding.

  • May 15, 2024

    Fla. Suit Alleging Race Bias In New Voting Districts Proceeds

    A Florida federal court has ruled that a lawsuit by five Tampa-area citizens accusing state officials of using race to redraw two new voting districts in their region can proceed, saying the residents do not claim vote dilution and are not required to allege a discriminatory effect.

  • May 15, 2024

    Little People Wrestling Co. Starts 'Micro' TM Fight With Rival

    Low Budget Rock Star Entertainment LLC, which produces wrestling entertainment featuring little people, has accused two men of infringing its trademark by using the word "micro" in their own wrestling ventures, according to a lawsuit filed in Florida federal court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Russian Gas Ex-CFO Can't Nix $44M FBAR Suit, Judge Rules

    The former chief financial officer of a Russian gas company who was sentenced to seven years in prison for hiding money in Swiss banks can't escape the government's civil suit seeking nearly $44 million in reporting penalties, a Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Law Firm Urges Reversal Of Malpractice Arbitration Award

    The Ferraro Law Firm urged a Florida appeals court Wednesday to reverse a trial court order upholding a $1.5 million arbitration award against it over alleged malpractice, arguing that its opponent and former client improperly got a successor trial judge to reverse course after the first one vacated the arbitration ruling.

  • May 15, 2024

    EEOC Suit Over Vax Refuser's Firing Survives Dismissal Bid

    Arkansas-based Hank's Furniture Inc. must face a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit claiming it unlawfully fired a Christian manager who refused the COVID-19 vaccine, with a Florida federal judge ruling the agency plausibly alleged her beliefs conflicted with the company's inoculation policy.

  • May 15, 2024

    Fla. Sheriff Caved To ICE Detainer On American, Atty Says

    Attorneys for a Tampa-area U.S. citizen mistaken for a Jamaican national and nearly deported told a Florida federal judge Wednesday that the Monroe County sheriff lacked probable cause to arrest the man, arguing that the police agency blindly followed a federal immigration detainer without checking its accuracy.

  • May 15, 2024

    Hemp Co. Settles Sales Dispute With Fla. Regulators

    The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has inked a deal with a hemp-product maker that accused the agency of overstepping its bounds and using stop-sale orders to block it from selling its hemp products outside the state.

  • May 15, 2024

    Masters Employee Cops To Selling $5.3M In Golf Memorabilia

    A former employee of Augusta National Golf Club pled guilty Wednesday to stealing $5.3 million worth of memorabilia from the Masters golf tournament and selling it online, including a green jacket belonging to Arnold Palmer.

  • May 15, 2024

    Insurer Wants Payback For Covering Theater Group Theft

    An insurance company has asked a Connecticut federal court to force a married couple to pay for coverage it granted a theater education group that it says was bilked out of nearly $588,000 by the pair via personal use of the nonprofit's funds.

  • May 15, 2024

    Fees Sought For Missed Depo During Atty's Solar Eclipse Trip

    In following up on a Florida federal judge's sanctioning of a lawyer whose client missed a deposition while the attorney was solar eclipse viewing, AAA is asking the court to award it more than $7,800 in fees and costs as it fights a gender discrimination lawsuit.

  • May 15, 2024

    Florida Judicial Ethics Panel Split Over Personal Fundraising

     A judicial candidate may distribute business cards and other campaign materials with a web address for his campaign site that includes an option to donate but cannot post a cover photo with that same URL on the candidate's personal Facebook page, the majority of Florida's Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee has found.

  • May 14, 2024

    Gunster Data Breach Affected 9K Clients' Data, Suit Says

    A former client of Gunster Yoakley & Stewart PA has filed a proposed class action in Florida federal court, alleging the law firm's weak cybersecurity systems allowed outsiders to access clients' personal and sensitive health information and that the firm waited over a year to inform those affected.

  • May 14, 2024

    Asset Manager Cops To $1.2B Venezuelan Oil Co. Fraud

    An asset manager pled guilty Tuesday to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering for his role in a $1.2 billion scheme to embezzle money from Venezuela's state-owned oil company and launder it through false investment schemes in the U.S. and abroad.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOI Urges High Court To Uphold Seminole Gambling Compact

    Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to deny a petition by two casino operators seeking to undo a sports gambling compact between the state of Florida and the Seminole Tribe, arguing that such agreements may include provisions that address matters off tribal lands.

Expert Analysis

  • Reverse Veil-Piercing Ruling Will Help Judgment Creditors

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s recent decision in Citibank v. Aralpa Holdings, finding two corporate entities liable for a judgment issued against a Mexican businessman, shows the value of reverse veil piercing as a remedy for judgment creditors to go after sophisticated debtors who squirrel away assets, says Gabe Bluestone at Omni Bridgeway.

  • Ensuring Nonpublic Info Stays Private Amid SEC Crackdown

    Author Photo

    Companies and individuals must take steps to ensure material nonpublic information remains confidential while working outside the office, as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission continues to take enforcement actions against those who trade on MNPI and don't comply with new off-channel communications rules in the remote work era, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • Surveying Legislative Trends As States Rush To Regulate AI

    Author Photo

    With Congress unlikely to pass comprehensive artificial intelligence legislation any time soon, just four months into 2024, nearly every state has introduced legislation aimed at the development and use of AI on subjects from algorithmic discrimination risk to generative AI disclosures, say David Kappos and Sasha Rosenthal-Larrea at Cravath.

  • Clemson's ACC Exit Fee Suit May Have Major Consequences

    Author Photo

    Clemson University's recent suit in South Carolina state court against the Atlantic Coast Conference, which challenges the ACC's $140 million exit fee and its ownership of member schools' media rights, would likely have enormous ramifications for ACC members in the event of a definitive court ruling, say William Sullivan and Alex Anderson at Pillsbury.

  • Strategies For Challenging A Fla. Grand Jury Report's Release

    Author Photo

    A Florida grand jury’s recent report on potential wrongdoing related to COVID-19 vaccines should serve as a reminder to attorneys to review the myriad legal mechanisms available to challenge the lawfulness of a grand jury report’s publication and expunge the names of their clients, says Cary Aronovitz at Holland & Knight.

  • A Look At Ex Parte Seizures 8 Years Post-DTSA

    Author Photo

    In the eight years since the Defend Trade Secrets Act was enacted, not much has changed for jurisprudence on ex parte seizures, but a few seminal rulings show that there still isn’t a bright line on what qualifies as extraordinary circumstances warranting a seizure, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

    Author Photo

    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

    Author Photo

    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Blocked JetBlue-Spirit Deal Illustrates New Antitrust Approach

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent successful block of a merger between JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines demonstrates antitrust enforcers’ updated and disparate approach to out-of-market benefits versus out-of-market harms, say Lisa Rumin and Anthony Ferrara at McDermott.

  • Series

    Fla. Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q1

    Author Photo

    Early 2024 developments that could have a notable impact on Florida's finance community include progress on a bill that would substantially revise the state Securities and Investor Protection Act, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's final rule capping late fees for larger credit card issuers, say Benjamin Weinberg and Megan Riley at Leon Cosgrove.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

    Author Photo

    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

    Author Photo

    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • What NAR Settlement Means For Agent Commission Rates

    Author Photo

    If approved, a joint settlement agreement between the National Association of Realtors and a class of home sellers will likely take the onus off home sellers to compensate buyers' agents, affecting considerations for all parties to real estate transactions, say attorneys at Jones Foster.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Florida archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!