Government Contracts

  • April 30, 2024

    10th Circ. Says Biden Can Raise Contractors' Minimum Wage

    President Joe Biden's minimum hourly wage increase for federal contractors to $15 is intertwined with furthering the economy and is therefore supported by the Procurement Act, a split Tenth Circuit panel ruled Tuesday, agreeing with a Colorado federal court to keep the wage bump.

  • April 30, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Moon Rover, Doomsday Planes

    In April, the U.S. vowed to make a Japanese astronaut the first non-U.S. citizen to step on the moon in exchange for Japan and Toyota's habitable lunar rover and advanced a $13.1 billion effort for new Doomsday planes designed to withstand nuclear warfare. Here, Law360 looks at some of the most noteworthy government contracts over the last month.

  • April 30, 2024

    Jury Convicts Ill. Biz Owner Of $1.3M VA Kickback Scheme

    An Illinois business owner was convicted on Monday of eight counts of wire fraud for paying kickbacks to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clerk in exchange for what prosecutors called "bogus" monthly rental fees.

  • April 29, 2024

    ReNew Health To Pay $7M To Settle COVID-19 FCA Claims

    ReNew Health Group LLC has agreed to pay the federal government and California $7 million to settle whistleblower allegations that the healthcare provider misused a COVID-19 waiver intended to free up hospital beds by submitting fraudulent claims for nursing home residents, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • April 29, 2024

    Split 7th Circ. Clears Insurers In O'Hare Steel Defect Fight

    A split Seventh Circuit affirmed Monday a finding that the Chicago O'Hare International Airport canopy's general contractor can't recoup more than $37.5 million in costs from its insurer over cracked welds in the canopy, finding that the defects in the welds and columns don't constitute property damage under its insurance policies.

  • April 29, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Gives HP Unit 2nd Chance To Challenge Camera IP

    The Federal Circuit on Monday revived a debate about whether FullView Inc.'s panoramic camera system patent should be invalidated as obvious, while affirming a California federal judge's decision that HP unit Polycom Inc. infringed that patent.

  • April 29, 2024

    GSA Guides Agencies On Responsible Generative AI Buying

    The U.S. General Services Administration on Monday issued guidance to federal agencies for buying generative artificial intelligence services and related hardware, intended to ensure that emerging technology is used "responsibly and effectively."

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-COO Of Mo. Charity Gets 3 Years For Bribing Officials

    The former chief operating officer of a Missouri-based healthcare charity was sentenced to three years in prison Monday after admitting she and her husband, the charity's ex-chief financial officer, conspired to bribe elected officials in Arkansas, according to Missouri federal court documents.

  • April 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Raytheon Defeat Of Religious Vaccination Suit

    The Ninth Circuit refused to revive a lawsuit alleging Raytheon Technologies Corp. unlawfully harassed and forced out employees who received religious exemptions from its COVID-19 vaccination policy, finding Monday that companywide reminders about inoculation and other preventative measures weren't based on religion.

  • April 29, 2024

    Pa. Retirement Home Wants Ed Board Tax Challenge Nixed

    The nonprofit owner of a retirement community in a suburb of Pittsburgh has filed a lawsuit against the local school board claiming that the board violated a soon-to-expire payment in lieu of taxes, or PILOT, agreement that was brokered almost 15 years ago.

  • April 29, 2024

    Biden Admin's Border Wall Plan Must Be Vacated, Court Told

    Texas and Missouri again urged a federal judge Monday to vacate the Biden administration's plan to redirect congressional funding for a southern U.S. border wall as the White House pushed back, saying it would be an overreach to eliminate its directive.

  • April 29, 2024

    Pa. County Counters Sanctions Bid In Dominion Suit

    Local officials in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, have urged a federal judge to punish Dominion Voting Systems Inc. for its motion filed last month calling for sanctions against two county commissioners for filing an amended complaint in a breach of contract suit.

  • April 29, 2024

    Japanese Space Co. Settles White Ex-CEO's Bias Suit

    The U.S. arm of a Japanese space company and its former CEO told a Colorado federal court they have agreed to end the executive's suit alleging he witnessed frequent "anti-foreigner" bias at the company and was ultimately fired because he's white.

  • April 29, 2024

    DOJ Not Required To Probe Alleged Bias In Boston Contracts

    A Boston federal judge won't second-guess a U.S. Department of Justice decision not to investigate allegations of systemic racism in the city's municipal contracting practices, deferring to the department's finding that it lacked jurisdiction for the claims.

  • April 29, 2024

    IRS To Open $6B 2nd Round Of Advanced Energy Tax Credits

    The IRS will start taking applications May 28 from project owners seeking to get part of a $6 billion second round of tax credits for developments that will support the clean energy industry, such as solar glass manufacturing and metal recycling facilities, the agency said Monday.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Mineral Co. Faces Investor Suit Over Gov't Contract Loss

    Mineral producer Compass Minerals International Inc. has been hit with a putative investor class action alleging the company failed to properly apprise investors about the likelihood that it would not secure a fire retardant supplier contract with the U.S. Forest Service ahead of 2024's fire season.

  • April 26, 2024

    Judge Says NASA's Firewall Saves It From $554M Ethics Suit

    An unsealed filing shows the U.S. Court of Federal Claims backed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's decision to award a $554 million deal to an official's former employer based on the official's firewall from the deal.

  • April 26, 2024

    Support For 9th Circ. Rehearing In Oak Flat Dispute Mounting

    At least 100 religious and nonprofit groups, law scholars, Native American coalitions and tribes are urging the Ninth Circuit to consider a full panel en banc hearing on a challenge to block a copper mining company from destroying a sacred Indigenous religious site in central Arizona.

  • April 26, 2024

    Commerce Restricts Gun Exports To 'High-Risk' Countries

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday issued a rule restricting exports of firearms and ammunition to "high-risk" countries, a move it said is intended to avoid U.S. national security and foreign policy interests being undermined by misuse of those weapons.

  • April 26, 2024

    Co. Says Policy Fight On $45B DOE Deal Isn't For Claims Court

    A joint venture awarded a $45 billion nuclear waste management contract is urging the Court of Federal Claims to reject a rival's allegation that a U.S. Department of Energy policy change enabling the contract award was improper, saying the claims court lacked jurisdiction.

  • April 26, 2024

    Pacific Territories Temporarily Freed From 'Buy America' Rules

    The Northern Mariana Islands, Guam and American Samoa are exempt from "Buy America" requirements for certain federally funded infrastructure projects until March 2025, according to a policy the U.S. Department of Transportation released Friday to reduce the far-flung territories' infrastructure costs.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ga. Residents Want In On $300M Monkey Farm Fight

    Four Georgia residents have asked a federal judge to let them intervene in a dispute over the construction of a sprawling primate-rearing farm in Bainbridge, alleging the local development authority that approved a $300 million bond deal for the project is colluding with the farm's backers to advance the project.

  • April 26, 2024

    Rep. Stefanik Calls For DOD To Kick Off Critical Mineral Policy

    Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., is urging the U.S. Department of Defense to speed up the implementation of a new policy to boost domestic processing of rare-earth elements, which are critical for military equipment, saying this will make the United States less reliant on China.

  • April 25, 2024

    FDA Decision Didn't Prejudice Would-Be Contractor, GAO Says

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a Virginia technology company's protest of the Food and Drug Administration's decision not to amend a digital communications support deal's performance period, saying the company didn't show it was competitively prejudiced by the decision.

Expert Analysis

  • ChristianaCare Settlement Reveals FCA Pitfalls For Hospitals

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    ChristianaCare's False Claims Act settlement in December is the first one based on a hospital allegedly providing private physicians with free services in the form of hospital-employed clinicians and provides important compliance lessons as the government ramps up scrutiny of compensation arrangements, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    The PLUS Act Is The Best Choice For Veterans

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    Of two currently pending federal legislative proposals, the Preserving Lawful Utilization of Services Act's plan to diversify and expedite the processing of veterans' claims through an expanded network of accredited providers offers the better solution, say Michael Andrews at McGuireWoods and Matthew Feehan at Nearside Solutions.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • ASBCA Ruling May Pave Way For Pandemic-Related Claims

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    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals’ recent decision that the government failed to meet its evidentiary burden when it sought dismissal under the sovereign acts doctrine offers hope to contractors and subcontractors that faced performance challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, say Edward Arnold and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth.

  • Opinion

    White Collar Plea Deals Are Rarely 'Knowing' And 'Voluntary'

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    Because prosecutors are not required to disclose exculpatory evidence during plea negotiations, white collar defendants often enter into plea deals that don’t meet the U.S. Supreme Court’s “knowing” and “voluntary” standard for trials — but individual courts and solutions judges could rectify the issue, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • 2 SEC Orders Illuminate Bribery Risks For US-China Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s foreign bribery-related resolutions with 3M and Clear Channel offer important takeaways on compliance risks for companies with operations in China, from the role of traditionally low-risk vendors to gaps in internal accounting controls, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

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