Hospitality

  • February 28, 2024

    Sbarro Worker Appeals 'Prejudiced' Verdict On Rape Claims

    A former Sbarro employee asked the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to order a retrial on her allegations that she was sexually assaulted multiple times by a manager and co-workers, claiming a jury verdict favoring the company resulted from a trial tainted by prejudicial assertions, improper evidence and defamatory comments toward her and her counsel.

  • February 28, 2024

    Seminole Sports Gaming Compact Worth $4.4B, Report Says

    An economic research agency in Florida estimated in a recent report that a gaming compact between the state and the Seminole Tribe of Florida that is currently pending certiorari review by the U.S. Supreme Court will garner $4.4 billion in new revenues for the state over the next six years.

  • February 28, 2024

    Court Will Hear Arguments In Camp Operator's Bond Dispute

    A Montana federal judge will hear arguments next month to determine whether a campground operator can pay a bond in cash as opposed to a third-party surety that will allow it to stay the case over a lease dispute with the Blackfeet Nation pending an appeal to the Ninth Circuit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Ex-Development Director Asks 4th Circ. To Flip Bias Suit Loss

    A former development director for a North Carolina city said she supported her sex discrimination and retaliation claims with evidence that she was treated differently from male colleagues, urging the Fourth Circuit to overturn the city's win in her suit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Insurance Agency Says It Wasn't Told Of Airbnb Shooting Suits

    A Pennsylvania insurance agency accused of concealing that a Pittsburgh Airbnb property was subject to numerous lawsuits over a mass shooting has claimed that the property owner never revealed the problems when shopping for a new policy, so it wasn't the agency's fault when the new insurer canceled coverage.

  • February 28, 2024

    Seattle Convention Center's Virus Losses Not Covered

    A Seattle convention center operator is not owed coverage for pandemic-related business interruption losses, a Washington federal judge ruled, finding that although the governor's emergency pandemic proclamations prohibited access to the convention center, they weren't issued because of physical loss or damage to the property.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Can't Freeze $465M Penalty But Can Seek Loans

    A New York state appellate judge on Wednesday refused to freeze the $465 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump while he appeals the award, but said the former president could take out loans to cover the cost of the judgment.  

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Restaurant Rejects Revamped Wine-Tasting Death Suit

    Citing the statute of limitations and an alleged failure to plead a valid case, a venerable New Haven restaurant has asked a Connecticut state judge to reject an amended lawsuit accusing it of recklessly overserving alcohol at a "mandatory" employee wine tasting event and allegedly causing a worker's drunk driving death.

  • February 27, 2024

    La. Comfort Inn Owner Ordered To Arbitrate $2.6M Storm Suit

    A Louisiana federal judge has ordered the owner of a Comfort Inn outside New Orleans to arbitrate a $2.6 million suit against its insurer over coverage for damage from Hurricane Ida, saying its insurance policy compels arbitration.

  • February 27, 2024

    NC Short-Term Rental Law Fight Gets Partial Remand

    A North Carolina federal judge divvied up a proposed class action lodged by three vacation property companies claiming a county's recently passed zoning ordinance illegally places restrictions on short-term rentals, sending the state law claims back to state court but maintaining jurisdiction over the federal allegations.

  • February 26, 2024

    Live Nation Can't Cancel Suit Over Eras Tour Sales Meltdown

    A California federal judge refused Friday to end a proposed securities class action alleging Live Nation made misleading statements about its operations when news of alleged anticompetitive practices with Ticketmaster caused stock prices to drop, finding the suit describes "a materially different state of affairs" than what Live Nation claimed.

  • February 26, 2024

    Disney Sued Over Woman's Death From Allergen-Filled Meal

    A New York man whose wife died of an allergic reaction after eating at an Irish restaurant at Walt Disney World is suing both the restaurant and Walt Disney Parks and Resorts for negligence, asserting they were repeatedly assured that the food they were served was free of allergens.

  • February 26, 2024

    Timeshare Settlement Can't Stop Additional Consumer Suit

    A Washington marketing firm must face negligent misrepresentation and consumer protection claims over links to a timeshare-exit company, according to a Washington federal judge who ruled that a group of consumers seeking refunds are not barred from suing because of a settlement in another case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Fla. Official Can't Save Home From Verdict, Businessmen Say

    Two Miami businessmen have urged a federal judge to block a city commissioner's attempt to prevent the forced sale of his house to satisfy a $63.5 million judgment, saying he voted to unconstitutionally gerrymander the city's districts to include the property and also improperly claimed a last-minute homestead protection.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mass. Casino Gets 2nd Fine For Taking Illegal College Bets

    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission on Monday fined Encore Boston Harbor $40,000 for improperly taking bets on games involving in-state colleges, the second such punishment doled out to the casino in the past seven months.

  • February 26, 2024

    Miffed NC Biz Court Mulls Sanctions After Missed Deadlines

    A North Carolina Business Court judge on Monday chided counsel on both sides of an employment dispute for missing important deadlines on the eve of a jury trial, causing him to postpone the trial indefinitely and contemplate dismissing the case entirely.

  • February 26, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery dropped two potentially far-reaching decisions last week: one about founder control at Moelis & Co. and another about TripAdvisor's planned move to Nevada. On top of that, there were new cases involving Citrix Systems, Alcoa Corp., BGC Partners Inc. and Cantor Fitzgerald LP.

  • February 26, 2024

    Burford, Sysco Object To Nixed Swap In Price-Fixing Suits

    Restaurant food distributor Sysco and a Burford Capital affiliate both objected to a federal magistrate judge's decision not to allow the affiliate to replace Sysco in sprawling price-fixing lawsuits against pork and beef producers, asserting that the denial contravenes civil procedure rules and public policy.

  • February 23, 2024

    Restaurants Blast 'Fatal Flaws' In Chicken Price-Fix Deal

    Boston Market and other restaurants objecting to Simmons Foods' $8 million chicken price-fixing settlement with direct purchasers say the Seventh Circuit should unwind the deal because it improperly releases bid-rigging claims for no consideration and turns the massive two-track case on its head.

  • February 23, 2024

    Balloon Co. Blew Up Appeal Of Fraud Verdict, 1st Circ. Says

    A bid from the owner of a defunct balloon company to set aside an already-reduced jury award won't fly, the First Circuit has concluded, finding that the company's own acknowledgment about transferred funds "dooms their appeal."

  • February 23, 2024

    Trade Group Tells NC Justices COVID-19 Losses Not Covered

    A dozen North Carolina eateries are not owed coverage for pandemic-related losses, the American Property Casualty Insurance Association told the state's highest court, saying the policies at issue were never intended to cover economic damages "untethered" to physical loss or damage.

  • February 23, 2024

    With Interest, Trump Now Owes $454M For NY Valuation Fraud

    Donald Trump owes New York state nearly a half billion dollars after a county clerk on Friday tacked on $99 million in interest linked to a $355 million judgment in the state attorney general's civil fraud case against the former president last week.

  • February 23, 2024

    Staffing Co. To Pay $1.75M, Reclassify Workers In Calif. Deal

    An online shift-booking platform for hotel and restaurant workers will pay $1.75 million to end claims by San Francisco's city attorney and the state of California that it engaged in wage theft by misclassifying thousands of jobs in the hospitality industry, according to court papers. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Workers Snag Partial Win On Tip Notice Dispute With Denny's

    It is unclear whether 10 members of a collective in a suit against diner chain Denny's received a tip credit notice, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, nevertheless granting an early win to the other workers claiming defective tip credit notices.

  • February 22, 2024

    No Partnership In Hot Dog Eatery Deal, NC Court Rules

    A restaurateur has beaten a lawsuit that alleged he jilted an associate in a deal to buy hot dog eateries, with North Carolina's business court reasoning the two never had a legally binding partnership.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Civil Litigation Against Gun Businesses Can Reduce Violence

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    With mass shootings skyrocketing, and gun control legislation blocked by powerful interest groups, civil litigation can help obtain justice for victims by targeting parties responsible beyond the immediate perpetrator — including gun manufacturers, dealers and retailers, says Tom D'Amore at D'Amore Law Group.

  • Retailers: Beware Legislator And Regulator Junk Fee Focus

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    In light of the Biden administration’s recent focus on restricting so-called junk fee surcharges across industries, attorneys at Benesch discuss what retailers should know about several evolving developments, including a new California law, a proposed Federal Trade Commission rule, an expanding litigation landscape, and more.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: The UK

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    Following Brexit, the U.K. has adopted a different approach to regulating environmental, social and governance factors from the European Union — an approach that focuses on climate disclosures by U.K.-regulated entities, while steering clear of the more ambitious objectives pursued by the EU, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • How Cos. Can Prioritize Accessibility Amid Increase In Suits

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's notice of proposed rulemaking on digital accessibility and recent legal proceedings regarding tester plaintiff standing in accessibility cases show websites and mobile apps are a growing focus, so businesses must proactively ensure digital content complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act, say attorneys at Hinckley Allen.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Calif. GHG Disclosure Law Will Affect Companies Worldwide

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    California's Climate Corporate Data Accountability Act, which will require comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions disclosures from large companies operating in the state, will mean compliance challenges for a wide range of industries, nationally and globally, as the law's requirements will ultimately trickle out and down, say attorneys at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Return Days Key In Hyatt COVID-19 Layoffs Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Hartstein v. Hyatt, which clarified when the hotel giant had to pay out accrued vacation time after pandemic-prompted temporary layoffs, highlights the importance of whether an employer specifies a return date within the normal pay period, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • A Look At Competition Enforcers' 2026 World Cup Game Plan

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    Ahead of the 2026 FIFA World Cup, competition authorities of the host nations, the U.S., Mexico and Canada, have recently launched a joint initiative to police collusive schemes, setting an example for other countries' cross-border collaboration — so companies pursuing tournament opportunities should take note, say Carsten Reichel and Will Conway at Norton Rose.

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