International Arbitration

  • May 06, 2024

    Ancestry.com Unit Escapes Ill. Publicity Privacy Suit For Now

    An Illinois federal judge has tossed a putative class action accusing a France-based subsidiary of Ancestry.com of featuring individuals in its advertising without their permission, finding the plaintiff had failed to show that the company had sufficient ties to the state, while leaving the door open for the claims to be revised. 

  • May 06, 2024

    Asiana Airlines Says $50M Catering Award Can't Be Enforced

    South Korea's Asiana Airlines has urged a California federal court not to enforce a $50 million arbitral award issued to a catering company, saying the underlying contract, which guaranteed the caterer "unheard of profits," was only inked in exchange for a bribe paid to its disgraced former chairman.

  • May 06, 2024

    US Thrashes Mexico's 'Inaccurate' Portrayal Of GMO Corn

    The United States has responded to Mexico's ban on imports of genetically modified corn, calling its portrayal of the risks of such crops an unscientific and "inaccurate" description as well as a violation of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

  • May 06, 2024

    NOLA Can't Arbitrate $51M Airport Defect Row With Insurers

    A Louisiana federal judge granted a group of insurers a preliminary injunction Monday, relieving them from forced arbitration in a dispute over alleged design defects at a new $1 billion terminal of the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.

  • May 06, 2024

    Chickasaw Can't Reopen Optum Prescription Payback Suit

    An Oklahoma federal judge has denied a bid by the Chickasaw Nation to reopen its lawsuit over prescription reimbursement claims, ruling that the tribe has not met its burden of showing that provider UnitedHealth Group's Optum waived its right to arbitration.

  • May 03, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig No Longer Repping Guatemala In $32M Suit

    Guatemala's newly elected government has decided not to have Greenberg Traurig as its counsel in its fight against a construction and engineering firm's bid to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards, according to a Friday filing in a D.C. federal court.

  • May 03, 2024

    BVI Co. Looks To Force $195M PPE Fight Into Arbitration

    A British Virgin Islands company facing a jury trial next year in a $195 million lawsuit over a purchasing deal for personal protective equipment urged a Missouri federal judge Friday to send the dispute to arbitration in Oklahoma instead.

  • May 03, 2024

    Bangladesh Ignoring $13.5M Awards, Power Co. Says

    A pair of more than two-decade-old arbitral awards worth more than $13.7 million issued against Bangladesh and its power development board have resurfaced in federal court in Washington, D.C., after the power company that won them told the court that the Bangladeshi government continues to evade payment.

  • May 03, 2024

    NY Judge Urged To Detain Chinese Tycoon Who Owes $500M

    A trio of Chinese investors have urged a New York federal judge to prevent a Chinese cinema magnate from being deported, saying he will otherwise skip town without paying more than $500 million in arbitral awards and nearly $164,000 in attorney fees.

  • May 02, 2024

    Walgreens Fights $1B Arb. Award Over COVID Test Contract

    At-home lab test maker Everly Health urged a Delaware federal judge to affirm its nearly $1 billion arbitration award against Walgreens over claims the pharmacy chain deliberately misused the digital health platform's trademark while secretly diverting COVID-19 tests to its own pharmacists while Walgreens argued the arbitrator overstepped his authority in bestowing such an "egregious" award.

  • May 02, 2024

    Chiquita Paid Militants To Save Lives, Ex-Ops Chief Testifies

    Chiquita's former head of Colombia operations testified in Florida federal court Thursday on payments he approved to militant groups in the country during a period of intense warfare in the 1990s, saying his company was left with little choice but to make the payments because workers' "lives were at stake."

  • May 02, 2024

    22-Year ICSID Vet Confirmed As New Secretary-General

    Member states of the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes have elected a 22-year veteran of the World Bank-affiliated institution to replace Secretary-General Meg Kinnear after she steps down from her position next month.

  • May 02, 2024

    Ex-Yukos Shareholders Look To Nix $50B Enforcement Appeal

    Former shareholders of Yukos Oil Co. on Wednesday urged the D.C. Circuit not to disturb a ruling nixing Russia's motion to toss a long-running case to enforce $50 billion in arbitral awards against it, arguing that the Kremlin has already exhausted its options to try to dodge the awards.

  • May 02, 2024

    New EU, Japan Initiative Looks To Boost Global Supply Chains

    Japan and the European Union on Thursday announced a new initiative aimed at alleviating the economic dependence countries may have on others for certain goods by boosting global supply chains through transparency and coordination with like-minded countries.

  • May 02, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Creates National Security Practice Group

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has launched a national security practice to help clients with matters stemming from the increased use of economic sanctions, anti-money laundering laws, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, foreign investment regulations, export controls and import restrictions, the firm said Thursday.

  • May 01, 2024

    Amazon Can't Sanction Atty In Chinese Seller Award Case

    Amazon can't sanction a Manhattan lawyer for her alleged history of using "frivolous" legal arguments to try to send back to state court litigation to vacate arbitral awards involving Chinese sellers, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Use Of US Law In Maritime Malaria Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday overturned an order permitting an Indian man to invoke U.S. law in his lawsuit accusing a Singaporean ship management company of negligence after he contracted malaria during a trip to Gabon while working aboard a Liberian-flagged cargo ship.

  • May 01, 2024

    Crescent Petroleum Wins OK Of $2.75B Award

    Iran's state-owned oil company cannot escape having to pay an arbitral award now worth more than $2.75 billion owed to Crescent Petroleum after spending some two years ignoring the Emirati oil company's enforcement lawsuit in Washington, D.C., a federal judge ruled on Tuesday.

  • May 08, 2024

    Mantle Law Hires Construction Pro From Pinsent Masons

    Mantle Law (UK) LLP has hired a partner from Pinsent Masons LLP to its specialist construction, infrastructure and energy disputes practice in London, with the recruit kicking off his new role on Wednesday, amid a belief that boutique law firms are "coming of age."

  • April 30, 2024

    Chairman Ousted After Sex Scandal Looks To Prod Arbitration

    The ousted chairman of software investment company The Resource Group International Ltd. is urging a New York court to order his former company to submit to his arbitration claim, in which he accuses its top brass of improperly profiting after he resigned following a sexual harassment scandal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chiquita Capitalized On Colombian War, Victims' Families Say

    Attorneys representing the families of 10 men killed during Colombia's civil war told a Florida federal jury Tuesday that the Chiquita banana company is liable for their deaths, saying it knowingly funded a right-wing narcoterrorist group that committed atrocities against its workers as the fruit corporation expanded its business.

  • April 30, 2024

    Insurance Mogul Can't Escape $164M Dutch Payout Yet

    A shareholder accused of raiding a Dutch insurer's coffers can't stop it from trying to enforce a nearly $164 million arbitration victory, a North Carolina federal judge ruled, finding that he didn't show it's not enforceable in U.S. courts.

  • April 30, 2024

    HSF's Paula Hodges On Arbitration's Future — And Her Own

    Herbert Smith Freehills LLP announced earlier this month that Paula Hodges KC will retire from the firm as of Wednesday, with Simon Chapman KC and Andrew Cannon taking her place as co-heads of the global arbitration practice. Law360 recently sat down with Hodges, who spent her entire 37-year career at Herbert Smith Freehills, to talk about what's next, how commercial arbitration has evolved over her career, and her experience as one of the first women in international arbitration.

  • April 30, 2024

    Oil Co. Claims Nigeria In For Windfall From $11B Win Legal Bill

    An oil and gas company urged a London appellate court on Tuesday to change the currency for Nigeria's legal costs from a battle over an $11 billion arbitration award due to bribery and fraud, arguing the West African state would profit from exchange rate fluctuations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Know Your AI Tools' Limits, Silicon Valley Arbitrators Warn

    All participants in an arbitration proceeding that incorporates artificial intelligence are responsible for understanding the tech's use and limitations, according to guidelines released Tuesday by the Silicon Valley Arbitration & Mediation Center.

Expert Analysis

  • Bias Ruling Offers Guidance On Disqualifying Arbitrators

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    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W, removing an arbitrator due to bias concerns, reaffirms practical considerations when assessing an arbitrator's impartiality, and highlights how ill-chosen language by an arbitrator can clear the high bar for disqualification, say Andrew Connelly and Ian Meredith at K&L Gates.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Examining The Arbitration Clause Landscape Amid Risks

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    Amid a new wave of mass arbitrations, recent developments in the courts and from the American Arbitration Association suggest that companies should improve arbitration clause drafting to protect themselves against big-ticket settlements and avoid major potential liability, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Insurance Policy Takeaways From UK Lockdown Loss Ruling

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    An English court's recent decision in Unipolsai v. Covea, determining that insurers' losses from COVID-19 lockdowns were covered by reinsurance, highlights key issues on insurance policy wordings, including how to define a "catastrophe" in the context of the pandemic, says Daniel Healy at Brown Rudnick.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Assessing 2 Years Of High Court's Arbitration Waiver Ruling

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    In the two years since the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Morgan v. Sundance, clarifying that no special rules apply to waiver of arbitration provisions, the ruling has had immediate ramifications in federal courts, but it may take some time for the effects to be felt on other federal issues and in state courts, say attorneys at Norton Rose.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • 3 Notification Pitfalls To Avoid With Arbitration Provisions

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    In Lipsett v. Popular Bank, the Second Circuit found that a bank's arbitration provision was unenforceable due to insufficient notice to a customer that he was bound by the agreement, highlighting the importance of adequate communication of arbitration provisions, and customers' options for opting out, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Nazi Art Theft Ruling Is Bad For Repatriation Cases

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Cassirer v. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Foundation, holding that a Spanish museum doesn't have to return a Nazi-stolen painting to the original Jewish owners, spells trouble for future heirloom repatriation cases, which hinge on similar archaic laws, say Andrea Perez and Josh Sherman at Carrington Coleman.

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