International Trade

  • February 21, 2024

    DOJ Says Yakuza Boss Tied To Trafficking Nuclear Materials

    A Japanese national — who authorities allege is a leader of the Japanese Yakuza crime syndicate — conspired to traffic nuclear materials from Myanmar to other countries, including to a person he thought was an Iranian general, authorities alleged in New York federal court Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Cannabis CEOs Wasted Wealthy Russian's Money, Suit Claims

    Two California businessmen who were given $145 million by a now dead Russian billionaire to begin cannabis growing operations in the state are accused of gross mismanagement and squandering his investment, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Chinese Silicon Co. Says CBP Can't Back Forced Labor Finding

    A Chinese silicon producer is challenging U.S. Customs and Border Protection blocking its imports, arguing that the agency has provided no evidence to back up its finding that the company relied on forced labor.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Commissioner To Meet With Indian Gov't On TikTok Ban

    FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr is finally getting the chance to chat with Indian officials about the country's decision to ban TikTok over concerns about the Chinese government's influence over the app, a decision he has pushed for here in the United States, during a visit to India.

  • February 21, 2024

    Scammer Freed By Trump Indicted On New Charges

    A previously convicted scammer whose sentence was commuted by former President Donald Trump has been indicted by a grand jury on new charges that he began running multiple rackets, including a fraudulent aid-for-Ukraine scheme, shortly after leaving prison, New Jersey's federal prosecutor said.

  • February 21, 2024

    Commerce Can't Cite Wikipedia To Expand Duties, Court Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce couldn't convince the U.S. Court of International Trade that Wikipedia articles supported its expansion of vertical engine tariffs, with a judge noting that U.S. courts have repeatedly rejected Wikipedia as a source.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Threatens Ex-Trump Aide With Contempt Over Records

    A D.C. federal judge threatened to hold a Trump-era White House aide in contempt for his continuing failure to turn over all the records covered by the Presidential Records Act to the U.S. government.

  • February 21, 2024

    King & Spalding Trade Expert Jumps To Jenner & Block In DC

    Jenner & Block announced on Wednesday it had hired an international trade partner and six-year King & Spalding LLP veteran to join the firm's national security and crisis practice in Washington, D.C.

  • February 21, 2024

    White House Acts To Shore Up Cybersecurity At US Ports

    The Biden administration on Wednesday moved to boost cybersecurity at U.S. ports, announcing a series of actions that include new proposed rules to establish minimum data security safeguards and an executive order requiring transportation vessels and facilities to report cyber incidents.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Small Businesses Have Most To Lose From Digital Duties

    The possible demise of an international moratorium on tariffs for digital products, including software and media downloads, could cut into small businesses' profits and create compliance burdens for the companies that survive.

  • February 20, 2024

    Wells Fargo Says SEC Has Closed Hiring Practices Probe

    Wells Fargo said Tuesday that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has closed an investigation into the bank's hiring practices, following allegations that some bank managers conducted sham interviews to meet a diversity quota, while Barclays PLC has said it no longer faces an investigation into its anti-money laundering compliance.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks Texas Justices' Input On LNG Permit Fight

    The Fifth Circuit has yanked its prior ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by Texas environmental regulators for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal, saying it wants the state's Supreme Court to weigh in on how to define the best available pollution control technology under Texas law.

  • February 20, 2024

    WTO Says Revised Duties On Spanish Olives Still Out Of Line

    The World Trade Organization called on the U.S. to fix revised countervailing duties on Spanish olives, ruling Tuesday that the duties are still not in compliance with its 2021 decision rejecting the investigation that resulted in the tariffs.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ericsson, Lenovo IP Row Halted Amid Federal Probe

    A lawsuit alleging that Lenovo is infringing Ericsson's video technology was halted by a North Carolina federal court, which reasoned that a federal probe that will look into the same issues as the suit should be completed before the litigation can proceed.

  • February 20, 2024

    Akin Hires Top BIS Commerce Department Counsel In DC

    Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP has hired the former U.S. Department of Commerce's chief counsel for the Bureau of Industry and Security, who has joined the firm as a partner in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    International Trade Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP scored important wins across the international trade space last year, including shepherding bet-the-company deals through national security review, challenging fertilizer tariffs and guiding Seagate Technology LLC through a record-breaking export control settlement, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 International Trade Groups of the Year.

  • February 20, 2024

    Navalny's Death Pushes Biden To Ramp Up Russian Sanctions

    The White House said Tuesday that it will introduce new sanctions on Russia later this week in response to Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's death in custody, saying Russian President Vladimir Putin was ultimately responsible.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ransomware Group LockBit Hit By Coordinated Crackdown

    Two suspects linked to LockBit have been arrested and dozens of servers taken down as part of a global operation to disrupt the Russia-based ransomware group's activities, law enforcement agencies said Tuesday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trade Dispute Reform Draft Emphasizes Mediation

    A draft agreement for overhauling the World Trade Organization's dispute settlement process circulated Friday proposes a new emphasis on the institution's alternatives to the formal litigation process that the U.S. has criticized as exclusionary and inefficient.

  • February 16, 2024

    You Want Judge Reyna To Have Coffee With Your Brief

    U.S. Circuit Judge Jimmie V. Reyna on Friday told intellectual property attorneys that the best way to establish credibility at the Federal Circuit is through a well-written brief, saying otherwise they put him in a bad position and deprive him of coffee.

  • February 16, 2024

    Canada Liable Under NAFTA For Axed LNG Project, Co. Says

    A U.S. company that invested at least $120 million in a since-thwarted liquefied natural gas project maintained that Canada is liable for $1 billion in damages for breaches of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and that the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes has jurisdiction over its claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    EU Launches First In-Depth Foreign Subsidy Probe

    The European Commission is launching an investigation into whether state assistance gave a Chinese train manufacturer a leg up in its bid for a Bulgarian government contract, the authority's first investigation under the European Union's new foreign subsidies regulation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-FBI Field Boss Gets 28 Months For Foreign Payouts

    A former FBI field office supervisor was sentenced Friday to 28 months in prison for failing to disclose a $225,000 payment that he received from a former Albanian intelligence official while overseeing counterintelligence matters at the bureau.

  • February 16, 2024

    New IP Cases At ITC Plunged In 2023

    A new report about intellectual property shows that there was a "significant downturn" in cases at the U.S. International Trade Commission in 2023, according to an agency that represents expert witnesses for litigation.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Mitigating The Risk Of Post-Closing M&A Earnout Disputes

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    Today's uncertain deal environment makes a well-crafted earnout an excellent way for parties to accomplish a desired transaction that would not otherwise occur, but transacting parties also need to take key steps to avoid the risk of post-closing disputes that earnouts can present, say Chad Barton and Claire Lydiard at Holland & Knight.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • $32.4M Fine For Info Disclosure Is A Stark Warning For Banks

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    The New York State Department of Financial Services and the Federal Reserve's fining of a Chinese state-owned bank $32.4 million last month underscores the need for financial institutions to have policies and procedures in place to handle confidential supervisory information, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Exporters Should Approach Self-Disclosure With Caution

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    A January Bureau of Industry and Security memorandum created an abbreviated process for disclosing export control violations that lack aggravating factors, but deciding which disclosure method to utilize remains a complex strategic undertaking to which companies must give careful consideration, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Recent Laws Affect Foreign Purchase Of US Real Estate

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    Early diligence is imperative for U.S. real estate transactions involving foreign actors, including analysis of federal and state foreign investment laws implicated by the transaction, depending on the property's nature and location, the parties' citizenship, and the transaction's structure, say Massimo D’Angelo and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    Patent Waiver For COVID Meds Would Harm US Biopharma

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    If the Biden administration backs the World Trade Organization in waiving patent rights on COVID-19 treatments, it would negatively affect the U.S. biopharmaceutical industry and help foreign competitors, without necessarily expanding global access to COVID-19 care, says clinical pathologist Wolfgang Klietmann.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Considering A Practical FRAND Rate Assessment Procedure

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    As the debate over a fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory rate continues inside and outside courtrooms, a practical method may assess whether the proposed FRAND rate deviates significantly from what is reasonable, and ensure an optimal mix of assets for managers of standard-essential patent portfolios, says consultant Gordon Huang.

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