International Trade

  • April 05, 2024

    Fla. Men Admit To Illegally Sending Aircraft Parts To Russia

    Two Florida residents pled guilty this week in Arizona to conspiracy to violate the Export Control Reform Act by illegally exporting controlled aviation technology to Russia.

  • April 05, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Touch Texas Oil Export Terminal License

    The Fifth Circuit has rejected environmentalists' attempt to undo federal approval for a deepwater oil export terminal off Texas' Gulf Coast, finding the U.S. Coast Guard adequately considered the environmental consequences of the facility in its environmental assessment.

  • April 05, 2024

    Justices Urged To Mull Hezbollah-Tied Bank's Immunity 'Now'

    U.S. victims of terrorist attacks in Iraq warned the U.S. Supreme Court that forgoing review on whether a defunct Lebanese bank can claim sovereign immunity from allegations the bank funded Hezbollah would have negative implications on disputes involving foreign trade.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ex-Acting Homeland Security GC Joins Nixon Peabody In DC

    Nixon Peabody LLP has hired the former acting general counsel of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, who joins the firm after working with the agency for more than two decades and through four presidential administrations.

  • April 04, 2024

    Google Files RICO Suit Alleging Crypto, Investing App Scams

    Google hit a pair of China-based app developers with a racketeering lawsuit in New York federal court Thursday, claiming they defrauded more than 100,000 users with dozens of fake investment and cryptocurrency exchange apps placed on the Google Play store that bilked users out of their money.

  • April 04, 2024

    Caterpillar 'Talking Out Both Sides,' Judge Says

    A Delaware federal judge chastised Caterpillar Inc. ahead of trial in a series of orders mostly siding with claims from a defunct construction equipment supplier accusing the company of pressuring an online auctioneer to break an important contract with the would-be competitor.

  • April 04, 2024

    Steel Talks Absent From Start Of US-EU Trade Ministerial

    Conversations on the first day of the EU-U.S. Trade and Technology Council on Thursday focused on sustainability for both the planet and the transatlantic partnership, but noticeably skirted the pair's foundered effort to reshape the global steel market.

  • April 04, 2024

    Trade Court Pans Feds' Excuses, Orders Redo Of Steel Duty

    The U.S. Court of International Trade was unconvinced Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Commerce had corrected an old mistake when it raised a Korean company's steel countervailing duties, calling the purported mistake an excuse to break from old practices.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ex-CBP Agent Avoids Prison For Selling King Of Pop Signature

    A 75-year-old former border agent who pled guilty to selling a customs declaration form signed by late singer Michael Jackson ducked prison time Thursday when a federal judge in North Carolina instead sentenced him to a year of probation.

  • April 04, 2024

    Huawei Slated For 2026 Sanctions, IP Theft Trial

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Thursday set the trial of China's Huawei Technologies and affiliates for 2026, over prosecutors' claims that Huawei deceived banks and the U.S. government for years about its business dealings in sanctioned countries and conspired to steal intellectual property from U.S. companies.

  • April 04, 2024

    Mattress Co. Can Redo Conspiracy Suit After 10th Circ. Trip

    A Utah federal judge has rejected arguments from leading mattress manufacturers that a competitor is too late to amend an antitrust lawsuit alleging the spread of false information, saying a Tenth Circuit appeal prevented the competitor from updating its claims sooner.

  • April 04, 2024

    Judge Axes Experts In Chiquita MDL, With More On The Way

    A Florida federal judge presiding over a long-running multidistrict litigation against Chiquita Brands rejected expert witnesses offered by both Chiquita and plaintiffs who accuse the banana grower of financially supporting a defunct Colombian paramilitary group that allegedly killed their relatives.

  • April 04, 2024

    2nd Circ. Vacates Logistics Co.'s $1.8M Damaged Cargo Win

    A New York federal court erred by rejecting a Chubb unit's reimbursement bid for an over $1.8 million damaged drug shipment, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday, finding a genuine factual dispute on whether the logistics company in charge was a "contracting carrier" under an international treaty governing air shipments.

  • April 03, 2024

    2nd Circ. Told FIFA Bribery Convictions Rightly Nixed

    A former 21st Century Fox television executive and an Argentine sports marketing company told the Second Circuit that a lower court was right to toss their convictions related to the FIFA corruption scandal, contending that U.S. law does not reach foreign commercial bribery.

  • April 03, 2024

    China, Australia Make Deal To End Wine Duty Spat

    Australia has dropped its World Trade Organization case against China after Beijing agreed to end hefty tariffs on wine imports from Down Under, a notice circulated to the WTO's Dispute Settlement Body confirmed Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    EU Probing Solar Project Under Foreign Subsidy Rules

    European enforcers launched a pair of investigations Wednesday to assess whether companies bidding on a solar project in Romania received an unfair advantage through foreign subsidies.

  • April 03, 2024

    Nail Cos. Hammer Commerce's 'Death Penalty' Duties

    Importers and Taiwanese nail producers railed against U.S. Department of Commerce penalties in back-to-back Federal Circuit hearings Wednesday, arguing that the agency repeatedly slammed companies with duties amounting to a death sentence despite minimal or no wrongdoing.

  • April 03, 2024

    Epoxy Cos. Say Unfair Trade Threatens Crucial Domestic Industry

    Epoxy resin producers have called on U.S. officials to investigate rivals in Asia for unfair trade practices, arguing Wednesday that an influx of allegedly undervalued imports is threatening the domestic supply of an item with automotive, electronic and defense applications.

  • April 03, 2024

    Chiquita Says $6.9M Win Being Held Up By Banana Exporter

    Chiquita Brands told a Florida federal court that an Ecuadorian banana exporter deserves to be fined for skirting court orders requiring the exporter to hand over financial information needed to execute a $6.9 million international arbitral award to Chiquita.

  • April 03, 2024

    Akin Adds Ex-Treasury Atty, Sanctions Expert In DC

    Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP has hired a former top attorney for the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control, who has joined the firm's international trade practice in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Wednesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    DC Circ. Says FCC Must Rethink Terms For Chinese Video Ban

    The D.C. Circuit ordered the Federal Communications Commission to revise its definition of "critical infrastructure," but still upheld the agency's decision to ban the marketing and sale of video surveillance equipment from two Chinese manufacturers in a new ruling Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    CBP To Crack Down On 'Vague' Cargo Descriptions

    Importers will have a harder time bringing in shipments that aren't descriptive enough for border officials to identify following an announcement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection that the agency will issue messages advising of noncompliance.

  • April 02, 2024

    Seattle Seaport Co. Defying Clean Water Act, Green Group Says

    SSA Marine Inc. is allegedly violating the Clean Water Act by allowing excess contaminated stormwater from its port cargo facility to pollute Seattle's Duwamish River and Elliott Bay, according to a citizen lawsuit filed by an environmental group.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

  • April 02, 2024

    Taiwanese Co. Rips Steel Nail Duty Based On Auto Records

    A Taiwanese steel nail producer took the U.S. Department of Commerce to court over an anti-dumping duty rate that the company claims was improperly based on the financial records of a company that produces automobile parts.

Expert Analysis

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

    Author Photo

    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Takeaways From Groundbreaking Data Transfer Order

    Author Photo

    A recent first-of-its-kind executive order and related proposed rulemaking lay the groundwork for important outbound U.S. data protections, but they may have unintended consequences related to the types of data and the subjects within their scope, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • FARA Enforcement May Soon Be In The Halls Of Higher Ed

    Author Photo

    Given Congress’ increased attention to rising foreign influence on U.S. college campuses, the U.S. Department of Justice may soon turn the Foreign Agents Registration Act spotlight on educational institutions and groups, which will need to review their possible obligations under the statute, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

    Author Photo

    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Opinion

    European Union Criticisms Of The FCPA Are Misguided

    Author Photo

    Some in the European Union have criticized U.S. enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for what they perceive as jurisdictional overreach, but this appears to overlook the crucial fact that jurisdiction is voluntary, and critics should focus instead on the lack of equivalent laws in their own region, say John Joy and YuTong Wang at FTI Law.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

    Author Photo

    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

    Author Photo

    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • The Road Ahead For Florida's Drug Importation Program

    Author Photo

    Though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Florida's drug importation program in January, a series of hurdles — including requisite buy-in from Canada — and potential legal challenges must be addressed before importation can begin, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Practical Steps For Navigating New Sanctions On Russia

    Author Photo

    After the latest round of U.S. sanctions against Russia – the largest to date since the Ukraine war began – companies will need to continue to strengthen due diligence and compliance measures to navigate the related complexities, say James Min and Chelsea Ellis at Rimon.

  • Assessing Chinese Cross-Border Data Transfers

    Author Photo

    Jet Deng and Ken Dai at Dacheng unpack the regulatory framework for cross-border data transfers in China, detailing the major systems at play, last year's policy adjustments, and an outlook and practice tips for businesses.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

    Author Photo

    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

    Author Photo

    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Opinion

    OFAC Should Loosen Restrictions On Arbitration Services

    Author Photo

    The Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations should be amended so that U.S. persons can provide arbitration services to sanctioned parties — this would help align OFAC policy with broader U.S. arbitration policy, promote efficiency, and effectively address related geopolitical and regulatory challenges, says Javier Coronado Diaz at Diaz Reus.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

    Author Photo

    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Trade archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!