Media & Entertainment

  • February 21, 2024

    Aerosmith's Steven Tyler Beats NY Sex Assault Suit, For Now

    A New York federal judge tossed a former teen model's sexual assault lawsuit accusing Aerosmith front man Steven Tyler of groping and kissing her in public without her consent, finding Wednesday that the lawsuit is untimely and doesn't allege a "serious risk of physical injury" to state a claim.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. Chamber Takes Privacy Regs Fight To State High Court

    The California Chamber of Commerce is pressing the state's Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that allows California's new data privacy agency to begin enforcing regulations it has finalized, arguing that there's "no way" state voters envisioned companies having less than a year to comply with the rules.  

  • February 21, 2024

    Supertramp's Ex-Drummer Says Royalty Deal Was For Good

    Supertramp's former drummer took the stand Wednesday in a breach of contract suit he and two other former band members brought against co-songwriter Roger Hodgson, telling a California federal jury that a 1977 agreement for all members to receive a piece of songwriting royalties was meant to be permanent.

  • February 21, 2024

    FTC Says Twitter Staff Prevented Musk Violating Privacy Order

    The Federal Trade Commission told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that were it not for Twitter employees disobeying Elon Musk's orders to grant some reporters "full access to everything ... no limits at all" to the social media platform's systems, the company may have violated a 2022 FTC consent decree.

  • February 21, 2024

    Mother Defeats Daughter's 'Que Sera, Sera' Royalties Suit

    A federal judge in Tennessee told the granddaughter of one of the Oscar-winning songwriters behind "Que Sera, Sera" on Wednesday that she should have simply said whatever will be, will be in a feud with her mother over splitting royalties that were already decided by a probate court over two decades ago.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ill. Court Vacates R. Kelly Victim's $4M Default Judgment

    An Illinois appellate court has thrown out a $4 million default judgment won by a woman who claimed jailed former R&B star R. Kelly physically and sexually abused her, saying certain procedural rules were not appropriately followed. 

  • February 21, 2024

    'Cyber Trust Mark' Will Get Vote At Next FCC Meeting

    The proposed "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for "smart" products will come up for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission next month, FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Google Judge Slams Lack Of User Choice, Mulls Privacy Cert.

    A California federal judge on Wednesday appeared open to certifying a class of potentially tens of millions of Google account holders alleging Google's ad auction practices violate privacy rights, doubting that users consented to data-sharing if they couldn't opt out and telling Google's counsel, "there's no transparency and there's no choice."

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Offer Conflicting Clues In Copyright Damages Fight

    U.S. Supreme Court justices hearing a case over damages in copyright disputes gave conflicting hints Wednesday about where they stand on the discovery rule, a judicially created doctrine that allows claims to accrue when plaintiffs learn of alleged infringement.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Meta Bid To End Ad Discrimination Suit

    A proposed class action accusing Facebook owner Meta of permitting discrimination in choices regarding which users could see housing ads appears headed for discovery after the U.S. Supreme Court denied the company's petition to appeal a split Ninth Circuit ruling.

  • February 21, 2024

    'No Theft' Of Eagles Lyrics, Trio Says As NY Trial Opens

    Three men accused of trying to sell stolen draft lyrics from the classic Eagles album "Hotel California" told a New York state judge presiding over their criminal bench trial on Wednesday that there was "no theft" and that prosecutors owed them an apology.

  • February 21, 2024

    Twitter Severance Fight Paused To Facilitate Settlement Talks

    X Corp., the social media entity formerly known as Twitter, and a group of ex-employees have paused their dispute over severance compensation, as a Delaware federal court signed off Wednesday on a proposal to stay litigation deadlines pending settlement talks.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms $90M Facebook Privacy Deal Over Objections

    A Ninth Circuit panel affirmed a $90 million class settlement on Wednesday to resolve allegations that Facebook illegally tracked logged-out users' browsing activity, calling two objectors' suggestion that the company faced $1.24 trillion in statutory damages "an unreasonable baseline that would violate due process."

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Commissioner To Meet With Indian Gov't On TikTok Ban

    FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr is finally getting the chance to chat with Indian officials about the country's decision to ban TikTok over concerns about the Chinese government's influence over the app, a decision he has pushed for here in the United States, during a visit to India.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Considers Adding Missing Persons To Emergency Alerts

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to introduce a new code to the Emergency Alert System to allow information about missing or endangered persons to be widely disseminated.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Looks To Finalize 'All-In' Cable Pricing Disclosures

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to vote next month on controversial rules to require cable companies to post "all-in" prices on marketing materials and subscriber bills.

  • February 21, 2024

    AT&T Says Satellite Cell Coverage Must Rely On Leases

    The Federal Communications Commission will soon vote on new rules allowing satellite companies to use spectrum to beef up mobile connectivity, helping eliminate "dead zones."

  • February 21, 2024

    Mark Geragos Owes LA Times $218K In Fees Over Libel Suit

    Attorney Mark Geragos must pay the Los Angeles Times $218,000 in attorney fees and costs after the paper defeated his libel suit challenging its coverage of a settlement for Armenian genocide victims, a California state judge said, rejecting Geragos' contention that the defendants "are seeking a windfall."

  • February 21, 2024

    How Trump's Hush Money Trial Helps Or Hurts Jack Smith

    Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's porn star hush money case against Donald Trump is set to be the first criminal trial of a former president in U.S. history, a development that carries potential risks and benefits for special counsel Jack Smith, especially as one expert characterized the New York case as "legally and factually weak."

  • February 21, 2024

    NY Judge Trims American Idol Singer's Suit Against NY Atty

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a suit against an attorney from a former American Idol contestant, allowing the artist to proceed only with her breach of fiduciary duty and faithless servant claims.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. AG Settles With DoorDash Over Marketing Data Sale

    DoorDash will pay $375,000 to resolve the California attorney general's claims that the food delivery service violated the state's landmark consumer privacy law by failing to clearly inform users of their ability to opt out of the sale of their personal information to a marketing vendor, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Giuliani Seeks New Trial, Will Appeal $148M Defamation Award

    Rudy Giuliani is urging a Washington, D.C., federal judge to rethink a jury verdict directing him to pay $148 million to two Georgia election workers he was found liable for defaming as he tees up an appeal of the jury award to the D.C. Circuit.

  • February 21, 2024

    Media & Entertainment Group Of The Year: Davis Wright

    Davis Wright Tremaine LLP notched a win for the publishing industry when a New York federal judge in March ruled it was illegal for the Internet Archive to scan and lend out books without payment or permission, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 Media and Entertainment Groups of the Year.

  • February 21, 2024

    House Leaders Create Bipartisan AI Task Force

    The House of Representatives is forming a bipartisan task force on artificial intelligence, with leaders in the lower chamber planning to explore ways to maintain America's lead on AI while considering "guardrails" for the technology.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Retailers Must Be Mindful Of Sale Ads As Class Actions Rise

    Author Photo

    A recent uptick in class actions filed against retailers over a breadth of allegedly deceptive pricing practices — including misleading reference prices for sales and discounts offered on a perpetual basis — show no sign of slowing down, indicating that class counsel are laser-focused on challenging advertising strategies, say Louis DiLorenzo and Paavana Kumar at Davis+Gilbert.

  • Legislative And Litigation Trends In Environmental Advertising

    Author Photo

    Companies that tout their products' environmental benefits can significantly reduce the risk that they will face allegations of greenwashing by staying up to date on related Federal Trade Commission guidance, state requirements and litigation trends, say Raqiyyah Pippins and Kelsie Sicinski at Arnold & Porter.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

    Author Photo

    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

    Author Photo

    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Should Overturn The Miles Davis Tattoo Ruling

    Author Photo

    A California district court made several missteps that led to a finding that celebrity artist Kat Von D's Miles Davis tattoo did not infringe copyright, and the Ninth Circuit should overturn the decision because recent U.S. Supreme Court guidance was ignored and the jury did not receive adequate instruction, says Brian Moriarty at Hamilton Brook.

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

    Author Photo

    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • A Refresher On Alcohol Sponsorships Before The Super Bowl

    Author Photo

    As millions of people will see in Super Bowl commercials Sunday, celebrity sponsorships continue to be a valuable tool for alcohol beverage marketers — and those looking to better target audiences must understand how regulation of the alcohol industry affects these deals, say attorneys at McDermott.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!