Michigan

  • March 01, 2024

    Cannabis Consulting Co. Says Clinic Owes $101K On Contract

    A laboratory and consulting firm that focuses on the cannabis industry alleged that a Michigan clinic owes the firm more than $100,000 for unpaid services, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Auto Coverage Hinges On Victim's Domicile, Mich. Panel Says

    A dispute over personal protection insurance will return to a trial court to determine whether a crash victim was residing in Michigan or Kentucky at the time of the incident, after a Michigan state appeals court granted neither the victim's guardian nor Progressive an early win.

  • March 01, 2024

    Mich. Wineries Crush Town's Live Music, Catering Bans

    A Michigan federal judge has again ruled that a township's bans on wineries hosting amplified live music and catering are preempted by state regulations, narrowing a long-running zoning dispute ahead of an April trial.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Real Estate Brokerage Settles Data Breach Class Claims

    A proposed class settled a data breach lawsuit against a Denver-based real estate brokerage and property management company in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Romantics Singer Can't Tune Out Atty's Copy-Paste Error

    A founding member of The Romantics can't regain control of the band's finances after his attorney mistakenly copied an opposing brief that said the singer should lose, a Michigan state appeals panel has ruled, because the lawyer had certified that she read the brief before filing. 

  • February 29, 2024

    Ousted Mich. GOP Leader Can't Halt Removal Ruling

    A state appellate court said Thursday it will not suspend an order forcing Kristina Karamo to step down as chair of the Michigan Republican Party while litigation over her removal plays out.

  • February 29, 2024

    Auto Co. Says $50M Policy Endorsement Covers COVID Loss

    An auto parts manufacturer is seeking $50 million in coverage for its COVID-19 pandemic-related losses in North Carolina federal court, claiming its policy's "unique" communicable disease provision was misrepresented when its insurer denied coverage for losses at its Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and North Carolina locations.

  • February 29, 2024

    Mich. Judge Floats Sanctions If Doc Review Wastes Her Time

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday warned attorneys for a water engineering firm accused of prolonging lead exposure in the Flint water crisis not to waste her time by improperly withholding unprotected documents related to its public relations strategy around the case.

  • February 29, 2024

    Law Firm Recruited Objectors To Tank Vax Deal, Class Says

    Indianapolis-based law firm Kroger Gardis & Regas LLP is trying to unravel a settlement with Ascension Health Alliance because the firm wants to pursue its own class litigation, hospital staff told the Sixth Circuit in a brief filed Wednesday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Bankrupt Endo To Pay $465M To Resolve Opioid Claims

    Drugmaker Endo International has agreed to pay as much as $465 million to resolve criminal and civil claims stemming from its sale and marketing of a powerful opioid, and will turn over its assets to a group of secured lenders who will operate the company under a new corporate structure.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judges Tell Mich. To Get Moving On Flint Engineering Suit

    Michigan federal and state judges on Wednesday told the state to speed up its professional malpractice case against an engineering firm accused of prolonging the Flint water crisis, saying Michigan can't worry about whether it would look bad to go ahead before residents resolve their federal claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    6th Circ. Rules Copyright Law Is For 'Dull' Stuff, Too

    The top appeals court judge at the Sixth Circuit has issued a precedential opinion insisting that "all manner of works," even stuff that's boring and "run-of-the-mine," can be protected by copyright law, affirming a judgment that stuck a business with more than $1 million in damages and fees for copying the terms and conditions used by a car-dealer loyalty program.

  • February 28, 2024

    COVID Fraud Jury Can't Hear Of Gov't's Loan Error, Feds Say

    A jury shouldn't be shown evidence of the U.S. government's error in approving a Michigan business owner's application for a Paycheck Protection Program loan while he was under indictment, federal prosecutors have argued.

  • February 28, 2024

    Tribes Urge Biden To Break Silence On Pipeline Dispute

    Great Lakes tribes are pressing the White House to break its "deeply concerning" silence on a fight to remove an Enbridge Energy Corp. pipeline from tribal lands in northern Wisconsin, saying the U.S. government is sitting on the sidelines as Canada and the energy company try to gut their sovereignty.

  • February 28, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Fiat Says Drivers Can't 'Pick And Choose' Warranty Terms

    A putative class of Dodge, Chrysler and Jeep vehicle owners cannot hold Fiat Chrysler to a promise of lifetime free repairs when the customers failed to hold up their end of the bargain, the automaker argued Wednesday at a hearing in Michigan federal court, asserting that the drivers failed to get required inspections.

  • February 28, 2024

    Michigan Atty, Trump Ally, In Default For Avoiding Pay Suit

    A default judgment was entered against a Michigan attorney known for pushing former President Donald Trump's unfounded voter fraud claims after a cybersecurity company said she didn't respond to 40 attempts to serve her with a lawsuit claiming that she didn't pay for voting machine inspections. 

  • February 27, 2024

    Mich. AG Backs Abortion Challenge, But Urges Narrow Block

    The Michigan attorney general on Tuesday backed a challenge from a group of reproductive healthcare clinics to abortion policies they argue violate the state's constitution, but told a state court that the injunction they requested could have collateral damage and advised a narrow block of the provisions. 

  • February 27, 2024

    Mich. GOP Chair Was Legitimately Kicked Out, Judge Says

    A Michigan state judge on Tuesday ordered Kristina Karamo to relinquish control of the Michigan Republican Party and stop claiming to be the party's chair, finding she was properly removed from office in a Jan. 6 vote.

  • February 27, 2024

    GM Calls Auto Parts Co.'s Raid Conspiracy Claim 'Delusional'

    General Motors argued Monday that a Michigan federal judge should toss "delusional" counterclaims from an aftermarket auto parts company in a suit that claims the company is selling replica parts with no license, saying accusations the auto giant lied to spark a government raid are "facially implausible."

  • February 27, 2024

    Attys Get Personal In Mich. Foreclosure Default Fight

    Counsel traded jabs Monday over Michigan counties' tax foreclosure practices, with a lawyer for county treasurers claiming the other side took advantage of a family medical situation to launch a default judgment bid and a plaintiffs' attorney saying the case had ruined his friendship with the other lawyer.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wolverine Can't Get Sanctions Win In PFAS Coverage Fight

    An insurer repeatedly withheld relevant documents from shoewear company Wolverine in a coverage dispute over PFAS chemical injury suits, but the behavior was not egregious and did not cause enough damage to Wolverine's case to merit sanctions, a Michigan special master said Monday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Hospital Denies Nurses OT For Work During Breaks, Suit Says

    A Michigan hospital has been refusing to pay a group of nurses and technicians overtime wages by automatically deducting pay for meal breaks they cannot take, according to a proposed collective action filed in federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Escape Engineers' Bribery Scheme Suit

    The United Auto Workers, Fiat Chrysler and others are off the hook for state fraud and civil conspiracy claims brought by auto engineers in connection to a bribery scheme between union officials and the automaker, a Michigan federal judge ruled Monday, citing a recent Sixth Circuit decision finding related allegations untimely.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Pending 6th Circ. Ruling Has Broad Class Action Implications

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    If the Sixth Circuit decides in FirstEnergy Corp. Securities Litigation to treat alleged half-truths as omissions for the purposes of class certification, public companies would be exposed to near-automatic class certification in nearly every securities case and would face steeper evidentiary hurdles at the merits stages, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Rethinking Mich. Slip-And-Fall Defense After Top Court Ruling

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    The Michigan Supreme Court recently overturned three decades of premises liability jurisprudence by ruling that the open and obvious danger defense is no longer part of a traditional duty analysis, posing the question of whether landowners will ever again win on a motion for summary dismissal, say John Stiglich and Meriam Choulagh at Wilson Elser.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Strategies To Help Clients When BOP Ignores Medical Needs

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    Defense attorneys should cite recent case law and the expanded compassionate release guidelines, effective Nov. 1, when making any post-sentence application to aid incarcerated clients whose medical needs have been neglected by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, says Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • Assessing EPA's Potential Retreat On Title VI Enforcement

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to close its Title VI investigation of Louisiana — rather than respond to the state's litigation challenge against it — raises questions about the efficacy of the agency's plans to use Title VI in support of its environmental justice initiatives, say Susan Richardson and Jeffrey Davidson at Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

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