Native American

  • March 15, 2024

    Tribe, Teck Weigh In On Columbia Pollution Claims

    A Teck Resources Ltd. unit is pushing back against the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation's argument that its claims for so-called tribal service losses for Upper Columbia River pollution were improperly dismissed, while a neighboring tribe is also urging a Washington federal judge to revisit a "clearly erroneous ruling."

  • March 15, 2024

    'Needless Circuit Split' In Tribal COVID Row, 9th Circ. Told

    An AIG unit and other insurers are urging the Ninth Circuit to rethink its decision ordering them to litigate the Suquamish Tribe's COVID-19 business interruption claims in tribal court, arguing that a three-judge appeals panel's unanimous affirmation "creates a needless circuit split on the scope of tribal-court jurisdiction."

  • March 14, 2024

    Florida Seeks Faster Action In CWA Permitting Program Row

    Florida is urging a D.C. federal judge to "accelerate the process" to determine if the state can retain some Clean Water Act permitting authority after federal approvals for its program were vacated, or else appeal an order that thrust a thousand pending projects into "unconscionable limbo."

  • March 14, 2024

    Lawmakers Secure $1.3B For Native American Housing

    A record $1.34 billion will go toward Native American housing programs as part of an appropriations package passed by Congress, a $324 million increase over last year's funding.

  • March 14, 2024

    FCC Proposes Adding Emergency Alerts For Missing Adults

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday proposed to require that broadcast and cellphone carriers send out mobile notifications about missing adults, similar to Amber Alerts about missing children, to fix a shortcoming in the nation's public safety alert system.

  • March 14, 2024

    Feds Say Healthcare Ruling Could Upset Tribal Relationships

    The federal government is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower court's ruling that ordered Indian Health Services to reimburse millions in administrative healthcare costs, saying if the two tribes prevail in the litigation, it would upend 35 years of practice between the agency and its contracting tribes.

  • March 14, 2024

    Mont. Youths Urge State High Court To Uphold Climate Ruling

    A group of youth plaintiffs on Wednesday urged the Montana Supreme Court to uphold a state court's ruling that invalidated laws barring the consideration of greenhouse gas emissions in permitting decisions.

  • March 14, 2024

    Energy Dept. Floats $2.26B Loan For Nev. Lithium Project

    The Biden administration is pitching a $2.26 billion loan to help fund lithium carbonate processing facilities at the controversial Thacker Pass mine in northern Nevada, saying they could support the production of as many as 800,000 electric vehicles a year.

  • March 13, 2024

    Ariz. Families Sue For Wrongful Death Amid Healthcare Scams

    The families of two Native American men are suing the state of Arizona and several of its entities, alleging that they're liable for their loved ones' deaths due to a lack of oversight on the "so-called sober living crisis" that led to one of the largest healthcare scandals in the state's history.

  • March 13, 2024

    EPA Designates First Navajo Nation Superfund Site

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is adding the Lukachukai Mountains Mining District in northeastern Arizona to its National Priorities List, with the district's uranium mining waste piles marking the first designated Superfund site on the Navajo Nation.

  • March 13, 2024

    Amazon Groups Ask To Meet Banks Over Oil Co. Financing

    A coalition of Indigenous people and fishing groups in Peru is asking to meet with leaders of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Citigroup Inc. to discuss concerns about state-owned oil company Petroperú and demand that the banks not help it secure more financing, according to the nonprofit Amazon Watch.

  • March 13, 2024

    FCC Waives Rules So Tribes Can Access Midband Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission is waiving rules for spectrum over tribal lands, allowing six Native American tribes to obtain licenses for unassigned 2.5 gigahertz spectrum over off-reservation lands in an effort to boost their wireless connectivity.

  • March 12, 2024

    Committee Approves Bill Aimed At Blocking New Mining Rule

    The House Committee on Natural Resources voted Tuesday to approve a bill aimed at blocking a proposed rule amendment by the Biden administration that would tighten the permitting process for mining projects deemed critical by the federal government despite concerns from Democrats over impacts to the environment and Native American sacred sites. 

  • March 12, 2024

    ISPs, Public Advocates Debate Need For FCC's Equity Rule

    Two major broadband providers on Tuesday disputed the need for the federal government's new, far-reaching rule barring discrimination in broadband deployment, even as public and consumer advocates argued that equitable rollout of high-speed internet remains a national priority.

  • March 12, 2024

    5 Questions For Former FCC Member Michael O'Rielly

    It's been just over three years since Republican Michael O'Rielly left his seat on the Federal Communications Commission, but a lot of ground has shifted in the telecom space since he left for the private sector.

  • March 12, 2024

    Tire Cos. Seek Exit From Salmon-Harming Chemical Suit

    A dozen tire companies are asking a California federal judge to toss a suit claiming a rubber additive is harming protected salmon, arguing that the litigation stretches the Endangered Species Act "beyond its breaking point" and that regulation of the substance belongs with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, not in courts.

  • March 12, 2024

    Gold King Mine Contractor Looks To Toss Final Navajo Claims

    An environmental and infrastructure services firm is asking a New Mexico federal judge to dismiss the last three claims the Navajo Nation lodged against it for the Gold King Mine spill in southwest Colorado, which sent several million gallons of hazardous mine waste into area waterways.

  • March 11, 2024

    Navajo Says Funding Bid Backed By Self-Determination Act

    The Navajo Nation urged a D.C. federal judge to grant it a quick win in its challenge to allegedly inadequate judicial funding, saying the federal government's arguments for why it shouldn't recoup a $15 million interest shortfall can't survive scrutiny under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act.

  • March 11, 2024

    Feds Pitch Draft Plan For Contested Bears Ears Monument

    The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are asking for public input on a draft resource management plan for the Bears Ears National Monument, prepared with input from partners including five tribal nations.

  • March 11, 2024

    Feds Seek Tribal Input On National Native Language Survey

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said it is surveying tribal governments and Native language community groups to collect data and provide "critical" information about how federal support can help revitalize languages that are in danger of disappearing.

  • March 11, 2024

    Walmart Fails To Sink Feds' Opioid Crisis Lawsuit

    A Delaware federal judge on Monday kept alive a government lawsuit accusing Walmart of fueling the nation's opioid crisis, ruling that the company could be held liable for filling illegitimate prescriptions its compliance officers allegedly failed to flag for unwitting pharmacists.

  • March 11, 2024

    Corps Says Groups Can't Show Dredging Permit Was Flawed

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and an Enbridge Inc. unit told the Fifth Circuit that several groups challenging a permit issued for dredging and construction for the expansion of a major oil terminal on Texas's Gulf Coast may want a different outcome but can't show any permitting decisions were flawed.

  • March 08, 2024

    Biden Administration Must Use Border Wall Funds, For Now

    A Texas federal judge on Friday ordered the Biden administration to use funds Congress specifically designated for the Southwest border wall to continue construction, issuing a preliminary injunction and finding that Texas and Missouri could face substantial harm to their state budgets without the injunction.

  • March 08, 2024

    Republican Group Fights ND Tribe's High Court Privilege Bid

    The Republican Governors Public Policy Committee is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold a ruling that determined state lawmakers are immune from civil discovery in federal courts, arguing that two North Dakota tribes' challenge to the decision could have a "chilling effect" on federal judges.

  • March 08, 2024

    La. Judge Won't Halt Clean Water Rule Favoring States, Tribes

    A Louisiana federal judge has rejected red states' and industry groups' effort to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new clean water rule that broadens states' and tribes' power to veto projects like pipelines, export terminals and dams over water quality concerns.

Expert Analysis

  • House Bill Could Help Resolve 'Waters Of US' Questions

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    Legislation recently introduced in the U.S. House that would restore Clean Water Act protection to areas excluded from it by the U.S. Supreme Court's Sackett v. EPA decision faces an uphill battle, but could help settle the endless debates over the definition of "waters of the United States," says Richard Leland at Akerman.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • New Initiatives Will Advance Corporate Biodiversity Reporting

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    Two important recent developments — the launch of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures' framework on nature and biodiversity reporting, and Nature Action 100's announcement of the 100 companies it plans to engage on biodiversity issues — will help bring biodiversity disclosures into the mainstream, say David Woodcock and Maria Banda at Gibson Dunn.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • Extreme Weather And Renewable Project Insurance Coverage

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The regularity and severity of extreme weather events driven by climate change are putting renewable energy projects increasingly at risk — so project owners, contractors and investors should understand the issues that can arise in these situations when seeking recovery under a builder's risk insurance policy, say Paul Ferland and Joshua Tumen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Unpacking OMB's Proposed Uniform Guidance Rewrite

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    Affected organizations, including state and local governments, should carefully review the Office of Management and Budget's proposed overhaul of uniform rules for administering over $1 trillion in federal funding distributed each year, and take the opportunity to submit comments before the December deadline, says Dismas Locaria at Venable.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

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