New Jersey

  • March 19, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says CFPB Can Go After Student Loan Trusts

    The Third Circuit ruled Tuesday that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau can carry on with its debt collection practices suit against a group of Delaware student loan trusts, rejecting their claims that they are just passive financing entities outside the reach of the agency's enforcement authority.

  • March 19, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Can Review Immigration Hardship Denial

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday revived a Trinidad and Tobago native's bid to cancel his removal based on the hardship it would cause his U.S. citizen son, ruling that circuit courts do have authority to review mixed questions of law and fact.

  • March 18, 2024

    Judge Irked, Pols Riled In 9-Hour NJ Ballot Design Fight

    A bid by New Jersey Congressional candidates to strike the state's controversial "county line" ballot design unfolded Monday during a nine-hour courtroom showdown highlighted by a judge's impatience with the proceeding's pace and his irritation with the attorney general's willingness to criticize the layout while refusing the join the case.

  • March 18, 2024

    Indian Potato Cos. Can't Get $4.4M Award OK'd In NJ

    A New Jersey federal judge has refused to enforce a $4.4 million arbitral award stemming from an ill-fated joint venture to develop a potato-processing production line, ruling that Indian affiliates of Idaho-based agribusiness J.R. Simplot Co. haven't shown his court has jurisdiction in the dispute.

  • March 18, 2024

    NJ Panel Upholds Right Of Towns To Regulate Cannabis

    A New Jersey town has the right to withhold support for a cannabis retailer seeking a state license to sell marijuana, saying that the municipality has the authority to determine location and density requirements for retail businesses selling pot, a three-judge state appellate panel said in a published opinion Monday.

  • March 18, 2024

    Seton Hall Aims To Erase Ex-President's 'Sensational' Suit

    Seton Hall University has called on a New Jersey state court to throw out its former president's claims he was forced out for blowing the whistle on alleged misconduct by former board chair and prominent criminal defense attorney Kevin Marino, saying the suit is "what can best be described as gamesmanship, and at worst sheer dishonesty."

  • March 18, 2024

    NJ Vacancy Crisis Is 'Over' With 12 New Judges Confirmed

    The leader of the New Jersey Senate said Monday that the state's judicial vacancy crisis has been declared "over" after senators confirmed 12 new judges for the Superior Court and approved two sitting judges to remain on the bench, bringing the number of judicial vacancies to their lowest level in about five years.

  • March 18, 2024

    Attorney For Sen. Menendez's Wife Conflicted, Feds Say

    Nadine Menendez, the wife of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and his co-defendant in a federal corruption trial in Manhattan, may be disadvantaged at trial due to her counsel's having "personal knowledge of certain facts relevant to this matter" that could compel him to testify as a witness, federal prosecutors said.

  • March 18, 2024

    NJ Official Says Court System Can't Avoid Harassment Suit

    A municipal court administrator has hit back against the New Jersey state court system's claim that she is not an employee in its bid to escape a state lawsuit over a former judge's alleged sexual harassment.

  • March 15, 2024

    Man Accused Of Cyberstalking NJ Judge Seeks Release

    A man representing himself after being indicted on allegations of cyberstalking a New Jersey judge urged a California federal judge on Friday to release him from custody pending trial, complaining he was initially charged with making threats against numerous officials, but the single cyberstalking count he now faces isn't cause to hold him.

  • March 15, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Chiquita MDL Experts Aren't Reliable, Parties Say

    A Florida federal judge overseeing the multidistrict litigation against Chiquita Brands weighed arguments Friday on what evidence should be excluded in two upcoming bellwether trials, with each side insisting the other's experts should be disqualified from testifying about claims that the company funded a deadly right-wing Colombian paramilitary group.

  • March 15, 2024

    DC Circ. Presses FERC On Justification For Pipeline Expansion

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Friday questioned whether the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission had demonstrated that a Northeast pipeline expansion project was necessary to ensure that the region would have enough natural gas during extremely cold weather.

  • March 15, 2024

    Military Subcontractor Says Partner Tried To Poach Work

    A federal subcontractor tasked with building secure facilities for the Marine Corps hit its own subcontractor with a $7 million lawsuit on Friday, accusing its former partner of deliberately undermining that construction work, in an effort to "steal" related contracts.

  • March 15, 2024

    White House Stands By 3rd Circ. Nominee Amid GOP Attacks

    White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre on Friday urged the Senate to confirm Third Circuit nominee Adeel Mangi, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge, amid widespread criticism from Republicans and a report that the votes might not be there to secure confirmation.

  • March 15, 2024

    Senate Poised To Vote On Union Atty Berner For 4th Circ.

    The U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on Tuesday night on the confirmation of Nicole Berner, general counsel of the Service Employees International Union, for the Fourth Circuit.

  • March 15, 2024

    NJ Panel Says Pro Se Attys Can Talk To Opposing Parties

    An ethics committee of the New Jersey Supreme Court has issued an opinion that pro se attorneys may talk to a party without consent of that party's counsel, calling the American Bar Association's 2022 finding that such communication breaks a rule of professional conduct a "tortured and counterintuitive construction" of the rule.

  • March 15, 2024

    $3B In Employment Tax Credits Claimed In Scheme, Feds Say

    Three New Jersey men who said they were leaders of religious and charitable organizations fraudulently claimed nearly $3 billion in employment tax credits from a federal pandemic loan program, according to a criminal complaint filed in New Jersey federal court.

  • March 15, 2024

    Camden Diocese Gets OK For Ch. 11 Plan On 4th Attempt

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden has won approval from a New Jersey bankruptcy judge for its plan to settle sexual abuse claims for $87.5 million after three prior versions of the plan were rejected over insurance carrier objections.

  • March 14, 2024

    DraftKings Gets PTAB To Ax Claims In 5 Gaming Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has found a host of claims across numerous peer-to-peer gaming patents weren't valid, handing a win to challenger DraftKings Inc. as part of a larger intellectual property fight.

  • March 14, 2024

    Axon, Cities Fight Over Producing Material From FTC Case

    Axon Enterprise is sparring with municipalities accusing the police equipment maker of monopolizing the Taser and body camera markets, with the local governments pushing for what Axon described as the "premature and improper" production of discovery from the Federal Trade Commission's since-abandoned case.

  • March 14, 2024

    Sen. Menendez Loses Bid To Nix Corruption Charges

    A New York federal judge on Thursday rejected U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez's bid to dismiss his bribery case, ruling none of the government's allegations target actions that could be considered protected activity under the U.S. Constitution.

  • March 14, 2024

    NJ Urologist Keeps Win In Prostate Procedure Med Mal Suit

    A New Jersey appeals panel won't let a man revive his claims alleging a urologist botched a prostate procedure resulting in his inability to ejaculate, finding the trial court was correct in finding that his standard of care expert should be excluded.

  • March 14, 2024

    Atty Rips Fox Rothschild's Gag Order Bid As 'Temper Tantrum'

    The attorney for two men suing Fox Rothschild LLP for malpractice has hit back against the firm's request for a gag order — which came after he called the firm a "corrupt organization" and threatened criminal prosecution — calling it a "temper tantrum" and claiming Fox Rothschild is merely trying to distract from the events that led him to make those comments.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Health Co. Says Future Harm Risk Falls Short In Breach Suit

    New Jersey healthcare provider Capital Health System urged a Garden State federal judge on Wednesday to toss a proposed class action seeking damages as a result of a 2023 data breach, arguing that the plaintiffs failed to allege their personal identifying information was actually misused.

Expert Analysis

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Courts Shouldn't Credit Allegations From Short-Seller Reports

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    Securities class actions against public companies can extend for years and lead to significant settlements, so courts should not allow such cases with allegations wholly reliant on reports by short-sellers, who have an economic interest in seeing a company's stock price decline, to proceed past the motion to dismiss stage, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • California's Offshore Turbine Plans Face Stiff Headwinds

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    To realize its innovative plans for floating offshore wind farms, California will face numerous challenges as companies investing in the industry will be looking for permitting transparency, predictable timelines, and meaningful coordination between jurisdictions, agencies, and stakeholders, say David Smith and David McGrath at Manatt.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Analyzing The Legal Ripples Of The EPA's PFAS Regulation

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    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency makes major moves on its pledge to regulate per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the developing body of PFAS regulation will lead to an increase in litigation, and personal injury and product liability claims, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Opinion

    Test Results Signal Poor Odds For Lead Cables Litigation

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    After sites in New York and New Jersey allegedly contaminated with lead by telecommunications cables were found by state and federal agencies to present no imminent threats to public health, it seems unlikely that mass litigation over this issue by plaintiffs firms or state attorneys general will succeed, says Andrew Ketterer at Ketterer & Ketterer.

  • How Justices' Disclosure Ruling May Change Corp. Filings

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    In the upcoming Macquarie Infrastructure v. Moab Partners case, the U.S. Supreme Court will resolve a circuit split over whether a company may be sued for private securities fraud if they fail to disclose certain financial information in public filings, which may change the way management analyzes industry risks and trends for investors, says Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • 3 Quirks Of New Jersey Insurance Coverage Law

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    There are a multitude of state-specific requirements and nuances that make New Jersey insurance law unique, including in the areas of duty to defend, reservation of rights and bad faith, say attorneys at Goldberg Segalla.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • Fintech-Bank Partnerships Hold Potential, But Tread Carefully

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    A study recently released by the Federal Reserve Board highlights the federal preemptions that financial technology lenders can take advantage of to lend profitably in certain states, though fintech-bank partnerships face some regulatory challenges as well, say attorneys at Venable.

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