Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • May 15, 2024

    Knicks Owner Must Face Sexual Assault Suit, Accuser Says

    A massage therapist has urged a California federal court to not let New York Knicks owner James Dolan out of her lawsuit accusing him of coercing her into a sexual relationship, saying she sufficiently claimed that he forced himself on her despite her refusals.

  • May 15, 2024

    House-Passed FAA Reauthorization Bill Now Heads To Biden

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday approved multiyear legislation reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration's safety and airport improvement programs, sending to President Joe Biden a package that would hire more air traffic controllers and enhance passenger protections amid high-profile aviation industry mishaps.

  • May 15, 2024

    US Accused Of Ditching Refugee Families Without Explanation

    Three families the United Nations refugee agency referred to the U.S. for resettlement after they fled to Kenya from Congo are accusing the U.S. government of leaving them in limbo after an eleventh-hour cancellation on their move to the U.S.

  • May 15, 2024

    Pet Telehealth Startup Canned Vet After Bite Injury, Suit Says

    A Massachusetts veterinarian says she was lured to a mobile pet care startup but replaced months later by a younger vet after she claimed workers' compensation for a dog bite suffered on the job.

  • May 15, 2024

    Minn. Suit Against Clinic Over Sex Abuse By Psychiatrist Fails

    A Minnesota appeals court has found that a woman can't pursue vicarious liability claims against a clinic for sexual abuse by one of the psychiatrists working there, saying she released those claims when she entered a settlement with the psychiatrist.

  • May 15, 2024

    No Coverage For Day Care In Toddler Death Suits, Judge Says

    A Progressive unit has no duty to defend or indemnify a now-defunct day care and its former owner in two suits over the death of a toddler who was left in a hot car, a Tennessee federal court has ruled, saying the vehicle involved wasn't covered under the day care's policy.

  • May 15, 2024

    Senators Release 'Road Map' For Crafting Federal AI Policy

    A bipartisan group of senators on Wednesday laid out a "road map" for artificial intelligence policy that calls for increased AI innovation funding, testing of potential harms posed by AI and consideration of the technology's workforce implications.

  • May 15, 2024

    Philly Landlord Settles Paralegal Assault Case For $6M

    The landlord of a Philadelphia office tower will pay $6 million to settle a suit claiming that negligent security allowed a man to sneak into the building and sexually assault a paralegal at a small law firm working upstairs, according to the plaintiff's attorneys.

  • May 14, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Catholic Abuse Claimants' Ch. 11 Appeal

    Sex abuse claimants removed from a Catholic archdiocese's bankruptcy unsecured creditors committee don't have grounds for an appeal because they couldn't show the removal was a sanction on them that cost the claimants anything, the Fifth Circuit said.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOJ Says Boeing Violated 737 Max Deferred Prosecution Deal

    Boeing breached its deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice stemming from the deadly 737 Max 8 crashes, but the government hasn't yet decided whether it will criminally prosecute the American aerospace giant for defrauding regulators, the DOJ said in a Texas federal court filing Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Fighters Likely Killed Victims In Chiquita Case, Academic Says

    A Colorado professor took the stand Tuesday in Chiquita's trial over accusations that it financed a right-wing Colombian paramilitary group that committed war crimes against civilians, testifying in Florida federal court that it was "extremely likely" the militants killed several men whose deaths family members blame on the banana company.

  • May 14, 2024

    Colo. Atty Disbarred For Ghosting Client In Jet Purchase Suit

    A Colorado disciplinary judge has disbarred a lawyer who abandoned his client in a lawsuit alleging the client was sold an $800,000 used business jet that was not airworthy, finding the attorney showed a lack of remorse for his misconduct.

  • May 14, 2024

    NC State Fights Cancer Patient's Presuit Building Access

    North Carolina State University is pressing the state appeals court to find it is insulated from an "unusual" order allowing a former graduate student worker diagnosed with cancer to inspect a campus building that tested high for levels of carcinogens.

  • May 14, 2024

    Hospitals Liable For Failing To Admit Killer, Pa. Justices Told

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court was reminded Tuesday, during oral arguments over whether someone can be officially treated at a hospital without filling out an application, that the case before them concerned a man who killed his girlfriend after he was turned away despite claiming homicidal and suicidal impulses.

  • May 14, 2024

    Mo. Court Says Chiropractor Must Face Broken Ribs Suit

    A Missouri appellate panel on Tuesday revived a suit accusing a chiropractor of negligently breaking a patient's ribs during a treatment session, saying the patient's two medical experts plausibly opined that the chiropractor used excessive force.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ship Had Blackouts Day Before Baltimore Bridge Crash, NTSB Says

    A container carrier that slammed into Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge and caused its collapse in March experienced two electrical outages during maintenance the day before it even left port, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Vein Tech Maker Faces Investor Suit Over DOJ Kickback Probe

    Vein disease device maker Inari Medical Inc. and three of its current and former executives face a proposed investor class action over claims that the company's share price fell after it disclosed an investigation into its compliance with federal anti-kickback laws.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ind. Panel Agrees Hospital Can't Be Liable If Doctors Aren't

    An Indiana appeals court has refused to reinstate a woman's vicarious liability claim against Indiana University Health North Hospital Inc. in a suit alleging its staff failed to properly diagnose her sepsis, holding the hospital can't be held liable for the conduct of agents who have already been released from liability.

  • May 14, 2024

    Detroit Will Pay $7M To Injured Scooter Rider

    The city of Detroit must pay $7 million to a man who was severely injured when he hit a large pothole while riding a Bird scooter in the city, according to a settlement agreement a Michigan federal judge approved Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Tort Report: Mass Tort Settlements Beset By Crooked Claims

    Fraud attempts during the settlement claims process for class actions and mass torts highlighted by a new report and an $82 million verdict in a drunk driving crash suit lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • May 14, 2024

    Mother Sues American Airlines Over Son's In-Flight Death

    A mother has hit American Airlines with a wrongful death lawsuit, claiming its flight crew members were ill trained and poorly equipped to deal with a medical emergency her teenage son suffered during a flight, according to the complaint filed in Texas federal court.

  • May 14, 2024

    Plant Gas Emissions Suit Tossed For Lack Of Injury Standing

    A West Virginia federal judge has thrown out a proposed class action alleging a plant operated by Union Carbide Corp. and Covestro LLC emitted carcinogenic gas and increased the likelihood of cancer in nearby residents, finding the claim of injury too speculative to support the case.

  • May 14, 2024

    Vince McMahon Calls Accuser Hypocritical In Arbitration Push

    Embattled World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. founder Vince McMahon has characterized a former employee's bid to strike his preliminary statement from her lawsuit as meritless hypocrisy, a move that comes roughly four months after she first lodged the shocking complaint against him alleging abuse and trafficking.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ex-Mich. U. Hockey Player Says His Graffiti Wasn't Antisemitic

    A former University of Michigan hockey player has urged a federal judge to keep his defamation case against an antisemitism watchdog group alive, skewering the group's "nonsense" characterization of his graffitiing near a campus Jewish cultural center.

  • May 14, 2024

    Scooter Rider Not A 'Pedestrian' In PIP Suit, NJ Justices Affirm

    An electric scooter operator who was struck by an automobile is not entitled to personal injury protection benefits under his auto policy, a unanimous New Jersey Supreme Court affirmed Tuesday, saying the operator does not fall within the definition of "pedestrian" for purposes of the state's No-Fault Act.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Federal MDL Rule Benefits From Public Comments

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    The new Federal Rule of Civil Procedure concerning multidistrict litigation that was approved this week by the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules incorporates ideas from public comments that will aid both plaintiffs and defense attorneys — and if ultimately adopted, the rule should promote efficient, merits-driven MDL case management, say Robert Johnston and Gary Feldon at Hollingsworth.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    New Mexico Fire Victims Deserve Justice From Federal Gov't

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    Two years after the largest fire in New Mexico's history — a disaster caused by the U.S. government's mismanagement of prescribed burns — the Federal Emergency Management Agency must remedy its grossly inadequate relief efforts and flawed legal interpretations that have left victims of the fire still waiting for justice, says former New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • How Purdue Pharma High Court Case May Change Bankruptcy

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in Purdue Pharma may be the death of most third-party releases in Chapter 11 cases, and depending on the decision’s breadth, could have much more far-reaching effects on the entire bankruptcy system, say Brian Shaw and David Doyle at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

  • SC Ruling Reinforces All Sums Coverage Trend

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    A South Carolina state court's recent ruling in Covil v. Pennsylvania National is the latest in a series of decisions, dating back to the 2016 New York Court of Appeals ruling in Viking Pump, that reject insurers' pro rata allocation argument, further supporting that all sums coverage is required whenever a loss could be covered under a policy in any other year, say Raymond Mascia and Thomas Dupont at Anderson Kill.

  • Del. Supreme Court Insurance Ruling Aids In Defining 'Claim'

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    The recent Delaware Supreme Court decision in Zurich v. Syngenta, finding that a presuit letter did not constitute a claim for insurance purposes, sets out a three-factor test to help policyholders distinguish when a demand rises to the level of a claim, says Lara Langeneckert at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

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