Public Policy

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. Chamber Takes Privacy Regs Fight To State High Court

    The California Chamber of Commerce is pressing the state's Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that allows California's new data privacy agency to begin enforcing regulations it has finalized, arguing that there's "no way" state voters envisioned companies having less than a year to comply with the rules.  

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices To Weigh Stark Split In Views Of ATF Bump Stock Ban

    A firearms instructor who claims the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives doesn't have the authority to ban bump stocks may have a slight edge when the case is heard by the U.S. Supreme Court next week, attorneys told Law360.

  • February 21, 2024

    Texas Crypto Firm Sues SEC To Avoid 'Unlawful' Enforcement

    A Texas-based crypto firm has sued the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in a bid to convince a Texas federal court to find that digital assets traded on public exchanges are not securities and protect it from potential registration enforcement cases.

  • February 21, 2024

    Crypto Law Firm Invokes Coinbase Petition In SEC Challenge

    Crypto-focused law firm Hodl Law PLLC told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that its standing to sue the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over its crypto policy is undeniable now that the agency has decided not to take up a rulemaking petition from crypto exchange Coinbase.

  • February 21, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Rights Declaration Over BC Gold Mines

    A consortium of southeast Alaska tribes is asking the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to hold an investigative hearing and declare that Canada is violating their human rights by considering and approving mines that threaten to pollute cross-border rivers and harm vital salmon fisheries without seeking the tribes' input or consent.

  • February 21, 2024

    Voters Want Ga. Officials Sanctioned For Withheld Evidence

    Voting rights advocates who faced off with Georgia election officials at trial last month are now seeking sanctions against the Coffee County, Georgia, board of elections and its attorneys for allegedly withholding evidence related to a January 2021 voting machine breach in the county and for knowingly allowing a witness to lie under oath.

  • February 21, 2024

    FTC Says Twitter Staff Prevented Musk Violating Privacy Order

    The Federal Trade Commission told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that were it not for Twitter employees disobeying Elon Musk's orders to grant some reporters "full access to everything ... no limits at all" to the social media platform's systems, the company may have violated a 2022 FTC consent decree.

  • February 21, 2024

    Hospital Debt Collector To Pay $1M To End Wash. AG's Claims

    Debt collector Harris & Harris has agreed to shell out $1 million to resolve allegations that it collected medical debt payments from tens of thousands of Washington state patients without disclosing that they might qualify for financial assistance, according to a consent decree filed in state court on Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    OCC's Hsu Floats Payments, PE 'Trip Wires' For FSOC Review

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's acting chief sounded an alarm Wednesday about the growth of digital payments and private equity, saying federal regulators should consider setting numerical "trip wires" around those activities to stay ahead of potential financial stability risks.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Federal Coal Lease Ban Case 'Is Moot'

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday vacated and remanded a district court's ruling that had reinstated a 2016 moratorium on federal coal leasing, with a recommendation that the litigation be dismissed as moot, saying there's no basis to conclude that a challenge to a defunct order is still alive.

  • February 21, 2024

    39 AGs Call For Federal Pharmacy Benefit Manager Reform

    The list of critics of pharmacy benefit managers continues to grow as nearly 40 attorneys general have thrown their weight behind a trio of federal bills they say would force more transparency into an "opaque" industry that has "been a cause of rising drug prices."

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Slams DOJ 'About-Face' In Asylum Rule Case

    A split Ninth Circuit panel agreed Wednesday to pause the Biden administration's appeal of a lower court order vacating a rule limiting asylum, as a dissenting judge excoriated the government for trying to settle the case after forcefully defending the rule.

  • February 21, 2024

    Chinese Silicon Co. Says CBP Can't Back Forced Labor Finding

    A Chinese silicon producer is challenging U.S. Customs and Border Protection blocking its imports, arguing that the agency has provided no evidence to back up its finding that the company relied on forced labor.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Cyber Trust Mark' Will Get Vote At Next FCC Meeting

    The proposed "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for "smart" products will come up for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission next month, FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    NYC Lawmakers Ask To Join Housing Voucher Suit

    New York City Council asked a state court on Wednesday to let it intervene on the side of a proposed class of New Yorkers suing the city to make it implement laws that aim to expand a housing voucher program.

  • February 21, 2024

    BIA Must Litigate Mont. Tribes' Trimmed Police Funding Suit

    A federal district judge partially dismissed claims in a lawsuit filed by two Montana tribes seeking to gain $3.8 million in additional police funding for their communities after they alleged the U.S. Department of the Interior kept their law enforcement budget at nearly the same level it was 25 years ago.

  • February 21, 2024

    FDA Let Pharma Co. 'Sidestep' Application Rules, Court Told

    The Food and Drug Administration has been hit with a suit alleging it wrongly allowed a drugmaker to expand the scope of its application to market a generic version of a blockbuster pulmonary hypertension drug.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    Boston Faces Suit Over Women's Soccer Stadium Project

    The city of Boston was slammed with a complaint in Massachusetts Superior Court by a nonprofit organization seeking to halt the city's pending privatization of the George Robert White Memorial Stadium in order to transform it into a women's professional soccer stadium.

  • February 21, 2024

    Mass. High Court Pick Challenged Over Past With Governor

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's pick for the state's highest court faced questions Wednesday about potential conflicts of interest arising from her past romantic relationship with the governor from members of the panel that votes to confirm judicial nominations in the state, a rare pushback by the Governor's Council.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pa. High Court Returns Insurer's Status Question To 3rd Circ.

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court reversed its decision to consider whether a state-created insurer of last resort is a public or private entity, sending the case back to the Third Circuit on Wednesday after determining that the question was a matter of federal law.

  • February 21, 2024

    Patent Office Proposes Having More Attys Argue At The PTAB

    Federal patent officials are planning to increase the number of attorneys who can practice before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, making a proposal to do things such as "designate non-registered practitioners who are recognized pro hac vice" as the legal head of a party in a proceeding.

  • February 21, 2024

    Inventor Group Loses Bid For Info From USPTO

    A D.C. federal judge has given the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office a win in a suit accusing it of flouting federal law by not adequately providing an inventor group with information it requested from the federal government relating to delegations of authority to various officials at the agency.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Commissioner To Meet With Indian Gov't On TikTok Ban

    FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr is finally getting the chance to chat with Indian officials about the country's decision to ban TikTok over concerns about the Chinese government's influence over the app, a decision he has pushed for here in the United States, during a visit to India.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ga. Urges Judge To Reject DOJ Bid To Join Voting Rights Suit

    Georgia officials want a Peach State federal court to reject the Biden administration's delayed attempt to join a lawsuit alleging a recent state election law discriminates against Black voters, arguing the move is driven by the government's concern about losing its own challenge to the state's voting rules.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • Opinion

    Oregon Law Would Compromise Management Service Orgs

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    If passed, a proposed Oregon law would materially limit physician corporate practice of medicine structures, causing significant disruption to the provision of medicine and hindering professional corporations' ability to focus on the clinical components of their practice, say Christina Bergeron and William Shefelman at Ropes & Gray.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • How DOD Can Improve Flexibility Under Proposed Cyber Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Defense should carefully address some of the more nuanced aspects of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program to avoid unintended consequences, specifically the proposal to severely limit contractor use of plans of actions and milestones, say Joshua Duvall at Maynard Nexsen and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Predicting DeFi Regulations At Home And Abroad In 2024

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    Though decentralized finance has advocates on both sides of the Atlantic in figures like U.S. SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce and U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, DeFi in 2024 seems likely to be folded into existing regulatory frameworks in the U.K. and EU, while anti-crypto scrutiny may discourage DeFi’s growth in the U.S., say Daniel Csefalvay and Eric Martin at BCLP.

  • Opinion

    Exxon Court Should Clarify Shareholder Proposal Exclusion

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    ExxonMobil last month took the unusual action of asking a Texas federal judge whether a proposal from climate activists seeking to limit oil and gas sales could be excluded from its 2024 proxy statement, and the court should use this opportunity to reevaluate SEC policy and set clear limits on when shareholder proposals can be included, says Stephen Bainbridge at UCLA School of Law.

  • Mitigating The Risk Of Post-Closing M&A Earnout Disputes

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    Today's uncertain deal environment makes a well-crafted earnout an excellent way for parties to accomplish a desired transaction that would not otherwise occur, but transacting parties also need to take key steps to avoid the risk of post-closing disputes that earnouts can present, say Chad Barton and Claire Lydiard at Holland & Knight.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Understanding SEC's Focus Amid Lack Of Final AI Rules

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    Although the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's proposed rules to govern artificial intelligence are likely far from being finalized, understanding existing regulatory provisions that could address AI risks with respect to development, disclosure, compliance and data protection could help firms anticipate and avoid pitfalls, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

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    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Planning For Stymied HSR Filings At FTC If Shutdown Occurs

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    If the government were to shut down in early March, the inability to submit Hart-Scott-Rodino filings with the Federal Trade Commission would grind transactions to a halt, and parties should consider numerous implications as they are negotiating or planning to close pending transactions, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

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