Courts

  • Justices Urged To Mull Hezbollah-Tied Bank's Immunity 'Now'

    U.S. victims of terrorist attacks in Iraq warned the U.S. Supreme Court that forgoing review on whether a defunct Lebanese bank can claim sovereign immunity from allegations the bank funded Hezbollah would have negative implications on disputes involving foreign trade.

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    Judicial Nominees On Schumer's Post-Recess To-Do List

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., laid out on Friday a busy agenda for when Congress returns next week, which includes confirming the president's judicial nominees.

  • Young Thug Can't DQ Prosecutor Over Questions To Witness

    An Atlanta judge on Thursday denied a motion to disqualify the lead prosecutor in the racketeering trial against rapper Young Thug and five others after weighing claims that she had made herself a witness, according to defense counsel.

  • John Eastman Says Inactive Status Hampers Livelihood

    Former Donald Trump attorney John Eastman asked the State Bar Court of California on Wednesday to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he can't sustain the loss of his livelihood representing clients like Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • Ex-NY Court Atty Found Guilty Of Official Misconduct

    A New York state jury on Thursday found a former appeals court attorney guilty of official misconduct for using her position to provide a legal opinion that helped her husband and his law firm secure a $55,000 payment from a new client.

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    Judge Recuses Herself From Cartel Case Over Exxon Stock

    A Nevada federal judge has recused herself from a batch of antitrust lawsuits claiming U.S. shale oil producers colluded with OPEC to drive up prices at the pump, citing her ownership of a "significant" amount of Exxon Mobil Corp. stock.

  • Ga. Says Listening to Atty-Client Calls Not Unconstitutional

    The state of Georgia has told the state's Supreme Court that prosecutors didn't trample on the Sixth Amendment rights of a man convicted of assault, because they didn't intentionally seek to listen to privileged phone calls between the man and his lawyer and because the phone calls weren't evidence at trial.

  • Judge Won't Pause Dismissal Of $114M Discord Stock Case

    A Houston judge has denied a bid from federal prosecutors to pause the dismissal of an indictment that accused eight men of running a $114 million pump-and-dump stock scheme, writing that the government's argument for a stay largely rehashes the merits of dismissing the case and "is not particularly persuasive."

  • Ghostwriting Undercut Bar Conflict Safeguards, Report Says

    The State Bar of California's former deputy executive director "violated the spirit and undermined the purpose of the Rule 2201 Program," according to a report the state bar commissioned investigating the former director's "ghostwriting" of reports connected to attorney discipline cases where conflicts arise, including one concerning embattled ex-attorney Tom Girardi.

  • Trump Can't Duck Secret Doc Charges On Immunity Grounds

    The Florida federal judge overseeing the classified documents case against Donald Trump rejected his bid Thursday to dismiss the criminal indictment against him, saying the charges don't make any reference to the Presidential Records Act that the former president said grants him immunity.

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    Jeffrey Clark Violated Ethics Rules, Panel Says

    Former U.S. Department of Justice Attorney Jeffrey Clark violated professional conduct rules, a D.C. attorney ethics panel preliminarily found Thursday following a disciplinary hearing centered on Clark's alleged efforts to throw the Justice Department behind former President Donald Trump's election fraud narrative.

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    CNN Sues DOJ For Biden's Special Counsel Interview Tapes

    CNN has hit the U.S. Department of Justice with an open-records suit seeking all audio and video recordings of President Joe Biden's five-hour interview with special counsel Robert Hur last October, saying in D.C. federal court Thursday that they "will help the public evaluate Hur's decision not to charge Biden and to close the investigation into classified documents found at Biden's former office and private residence."

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    Chief In-House Counsel Indicted Over Fake Law Firm Invoices

    A former chief counsel and compliance officer was charged in Manhattan Wednesday with stealing more than $200,000 by submitting fake law firm invoices to his then-employer, human resources consulting firm Segal Co.

  • NY Judge Revives Plan To Take Senior Status

    U.S. District Judge David Hurd of the Northern District of New York announced his intent to take senior status, according to an update on Thursday, after previously announcing similar plans and then reversing them in 2022.

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    Trump's Free Speech Challenge Rejected In Ga. Election Case

    A state court judge on Thursday refused to dismiss the indictment charging former President Donald Trump and his co-defendants in the Georgia election interference case on First Amendment grounds, saying the charges did not violate their constitutional right to free speech.

  • OneCoin Atty Gets 4 Years For Role In $4B Crypto Fraud

    The former head of legal and compliance at OneCoin on Wednesday was sentenced to four years in prison for her role in the $4 billion cryptocurrency scheme that defrauded millions of investors around the world.

  • Netflix Libel Trial To Feature Full Central Park 5 Series

    Jurors will watch Netflix's entire four-part dramatization of the Central Park Five rape case and exoneration before deciding whether the series defamed a longtime top prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday ahead of the trial.

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    Trump's Late Immunity Motion Fails To Halt Hush Money Trial

    A New York judge on Wednesday rejected Donald Trump's effort to delay his hush money trial based on his claimed presidential immunity from criminal prosecution, keeping the historic case on track for jury selection later this month.

  • White House Refuses To Call For Justice Sotomayor To Retire

    White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Wednesday that any decision by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to retire is a personal choice for her alone to make, amid calls for the 69-year-old liberal justice to step down while President Joe Biden is in office and able to nominate her replacement.

  • Judge Wary Of Atty's Bid To Cut Sentence For Hiding Assets

    A Seventh Circuit judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of an Illinois lawyer's contention that she should not have received an abuse-of-trust sentencing enhancement for helping her brother conceal more than $350,000 in bankruptcy assets, noting she deposited them in her attorney trust account and attempted to assert attorney-client privilege to hide her conduct from the trustee.

  • Sen. Durbin Urged To Pass Legislation To Curb Judge Shopping

    A coalition of more than 20 organizations have called on Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, to curtail the use of judge shopping through legislation and oversight because they believe more is needed beyond the Judicial Conference of the United States' latest action to curb "right wing" influence over the courts. 

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    Beloved Georgia Judge Writes His Own Obituary

    Senior U.S. District Judge Hugh Lawson Jr., a revered Georgia jurist known for his humor and lack of pretense, died Friday at 82, leaving behind an obituary in which he described himself as a religious man whose "last conscious thought" would be his wife's name and who considered all his children to be his "favorite."

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    Ex-Prosecutor Joins Manatt From BakerHostetler In San Diego

    An ex-federal prosecutor has moved his litigation practice from BakerHostetler to Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP's recently opened Southern California office to reunite with a former colleague from the U.S. Attorney's Office.

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    Trump Ally Brings Ethics Query Over Judge's CNN Interview

    An ally of Donald Trump has raised ethics concerns about a senior D.C. federal judge, complaining that the judge's statements on CNN about the former president's statements about the judiciary was "highly prejudicial" toward Trump's four pending criminal cases.

  • Ex-Saul Ewing Paralegal Gets 2 Years For $600K Fraud

    An Illinois federal judge sentenced a former Saul Ewing LLP paralegal to two years in prison for embezzling more than $600,000 from the firm's bankruptcy practice over nine years, which she used to make mortgage payments, buy a car and partially fund her son's college education.

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Expert Analysis

  • Modernizing Legal Education Through Hybrid JD Programs Author Photo

    Amid pandemic-era shifts in education, law schools and other stakeholders should consider the wide geographic and demographic reach of Juris Doctor programs with both online and in-person learning options, and educators should think through the various ways hybrid programs can be structured, says Stephen Burnett at All Campus.

  • How BigLaw Can Mirror Small Firm Attorney Engagement Author Photo

    BigLaw has the unique opportunity to hit refresh post-pandemic and enhance attorney satisfaction by adopting practices that smaller firms naturally employ — including work assignment policies that can provide junior attorneys steady professional development, says Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Ditch The Annual Review To Boost Attorney Job Satisfaction Author Photo

    In order to attract and retain the rising millennial generation's star talent, law firms should break free of the annual review system and train lawyers of all seniority levels to solicit and share frequent and informal feedback, says Betsy Miller at Cohen Milstein.

  • How Attorneys Can Narrow LGBTQ Gap In The Judiciary Author Photo

    Lawyers can take several steps to redress the lack of adequate LGBTQ representation on the bench and its devastating impact on litigants and counsel in the community, says Janice Grubin, co-chair of the Judiciary Committee at the LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York.

  • Employers Must Heed Rising Attorney Stress And Alcohol Use Author Photo

    Krill Strategies’ Patrick Krill, who co-authored a new study that revealed alarming levels of stress, hazardous drinking and associated gender disparities among practicing attorneys, highlights how legal employers can confront the underlying risk factors as both warnings and opportunities in the post-COVID-19 era.

  • Lawyers Can Get Ready For Space Law To Take Flight Author Photo

    While international agreements for space law have remained relatively unchanged since their creation decades ago, the rapid pace of change in U.S. laws and policies is creating opportunities for both new and veteran lawyers looking to break into this exciting realm, in either the private sector or government, says Michael Dodge at the University of North Dakota.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: What Makes A Successful Summer Associate? Author Photo

    Navigating a few densely packed weeks at a law firm can be daunting for summer associates, but those who are prepared to seize opportunities and not afraid to ask questions will be set up for success, says Julie Crisp at Latham.

  • How To Successfully Market Your Summer Associate Program Author Photo

    Law firms can attract the right summer associate candidates and help students see what makes a program unique by using carefully crafted messaging and choosing the best ambassadors to deliver it, says Tamara McClatchey, director of career services at the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Opinion

    Judges Deserve Congress' Commitment To Their Safety Author Photo

    Following the tragic attack on U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' family last summer and amid rising threats against the judiciary, legislation protecting federal judges' personal information and enhancing security measures at courthouses is urgently needed, says U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf, director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Recalcitrant Attys Use Social Media? Author Photo

    Social media can be intimidating for reluctant lawyers but it can also be richly rewarding, as long as attorneys remember that professional accounts will always reflect on their firms and colleagues, and follow some best practices to avoid embarrassment, says Sean Marotta at Hogan Lovells.

  • Keys To Digitizing Inefficient Contract Management Processes Author Photo

    Neville Eisenberg and Mark Grayson at BCLP explain how they sped up contract execution for one client by replacing email with a centralized, digital tool for negotiations and review, and how the principles they adhered to can be helpful for other law firms looking to improve poorly managed contract management processes.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Firms Coach Associates Remotely? Author Photo

    Practicing law through virtual platforms will likely persist even after the pandemic, so law firms and senior lawyers should consider refurbishing their associate mentoring programs to facilitate personal connections, professionalism and effective training in a remote environment, says Carol Goodman at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How Law Firms Can Welcome And Celebrate Autistic Lawyers Author Photo

    As the U.S. observes Autism Acceptance Month, autistic attorney Haley Moss describes the societal barriers and stereotypes that keep neurodivergent lawyers from disclosing their disabilities, and how law firms can better accommodate and level the playing field for attorneys whose minds work outside of the prescribed norm.

  • Law Firm Tips For Evaluating AI And Machine Learning Tools Author Photo

    Many legal technology vendors now sell artificial intelligence and machine learning tools at a premium price tag, but law firms must take the time to properly evaluate them as not all offerings generate process efficiencies or even use the technologies advertised, says Steven Magnuson at Ballard Spahr.

  • A Call For Personal Accountability On Diversity And Inclusion Author Photo

    While chief legal officers are increasingly involved in creating corporate diversity, inclusion and anti-bigotry policies, all lawyers have a responsibility to be discrimination busters and bias interrupters regardless of the title they hold, says Veta T. Richardson at the Association of Corporate Counsel.

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