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  • July 08, 2024

    Frost Brown Adds Former Solo Land Use Atty In Calif.

    Frost Brown Todd LLP has brought on a former solo practitioner and veteran California attorney with expertise in the state's environmental quality act in the firm's San Francisco office, the firm announced Monday.

  • July 08, 2024

    Willkie Real Estate Ace Jumps To Gibson Dunn In NY

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP has added to its New York office an experienced attorney who previously chaired Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP's real estate finance practice and who also spent more than a decade at Dechert LLP.

  • July 08, 2024

    Landowners Defend Wyo. Antitrust Claims Against Anadarko

    Wyoming landowners accusing an Occidental Petroleum Corp. unit of antitrust behavior are urging a federal judge to reject its bid for a win on their state law claims as the case heads toward a trial.

  • July 08, 2024

    Feds Seize $63M LA Estate Tied To Armenian Bribe Probe

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Monday that it will seize a $63 million Los Angeles estate that it claims was bought with bribe payments for the family of a former Armenian government official.

  • July 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Touch $9.7M College Hurricane Coverage Win

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Friday that a district court unlawfully certified a partial judgment in favor of The Baptist College of Florida for review in a $13 million insurance coverage dispute for hurricane damage costs.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    Robbins Geller, Rosen Law Firm Seek Lead Role In REIT Row

    Two parties urged a California federal court to appoint them as the lead plaintiff and their legal representation as the lead counsel for a proposed securities class action that accuses Equinix Inc., a data-center focused real estate investment trust, or REIT, of artificially pumping up its financial metrics.

  • July 05, 2024

    Trade Groups Sue Denver Over Gas Stove Ban

    A coalition of trade groups representing the restaurant, home construction, rental housing and propane gas industries have claimed in Colorado federal court that two Denver ordinances that restrict the use of gas appliances can't be enforced because they're preempted by federal law.

  • July 05, 2024

    NYC Developer To Pay $272M To Settle SEC Investment Suit

    A New York City developer and his wife agreed on Friday to pay $272 million to settle claims brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that they'd schemed to raise money from hundreds of Chinese investors using false statements.

  • July 05, 2024

    Landfill Cos., La. Parish Score Partial Win In Landfill Suit

    The operators of a Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, landfill and the parish itself have partially defeated claims filed in Louisiana federal court by local residents who say the landfill's "harmful and toxic odors and chemicals" caused them breathing problems, nausea and poor quality of life.

  • July 05, 2024

    Neb. Justices Decline To Rule On Property Value Appeal

    The Nebraska Supreme Court said Friday it lacks jurisdiction to rule on a county board's appeal challenging decisions by the state's Tax Equalization and Review Commission that lowered valuations for a company's property, finding the board didn't meet a statutory requirement to institute judicial review proceedings.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    Willkie Advising Saks Fifth Avenue On $2.65B Neiman Deal

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP is advising Saks Fifth Avenue's parent company on its freshly inked deal to buy the Neiman Marcus Group, advised by Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, at an enterprise value of $2.65 billion.

  • July 05, 2024

    FTC Wants Second Look At $1.6B CoStar, Matterport Deal

    The Federal Trade Commission has requested more information from CoStar Group and Matterport on a planned $1.6 billion merger that would round out CoStar's real estate analytics offerings with the latter company's virtual property tour platform.

  • July 05, 2024

    Mich. Tax Panel Drops Vacant Store's Value By $500K Per Year

    The highest and best use of a vacant commercial property at the time of its assessment was to demolish the improvements and hold it for future development, a Michigan panel ruled, lowering the property's valuation by nearly $500,000 for each of two years.

  • July 03, 2024

    Wash. Mall, Retail Center Seek $1.3M In Property Tax Refunds

    A Seattle mall and shopping center are seeking property tax refunds topping $1.3 million, according to complaints in state court that claim the county assessor failed to use appropriate data and overvalued the properties.

  • July 03, 2024

    No 'Unfettered Discretion' For Zoning Boards: Mich. Justices

    The Michigan Supreme Court has held that conditionally rezoning a property is only valid if the property's proposed use is already allowed under a town's ordinances, instructing a trial court to determine whether a racing dragway is a permitted use under a township's commercial zone.

  • July 03, 2024

    Hospitality REIT, Activist Investor To Drop Board Feud

    Braemar Hotels & Resorts and hedge fund Blackwells Capital said they plan to resolve their litigation in a deal that calls for the activist investor to withdraw from a proxy fight and buy a bigger stake in the real estate investment trust.

  • July 03, 2024

    Enviro Group Claims Navy Bungled SF Superfund Cleanup

    The U.S. Navy's efforts to remediate an 866-acre shipyard Superfund site in San Francisco have been flawed from the start, undermined by the Navy, which has gone so far as to obscure the results of its own contamination testing, per an environmental advocacy group's suit.

  • July 03, 2024

    Developer Owes $10M For Boston Project Delays, Suit Says

    Massachusetts contractor Suffolk Construction Co. Inc. claims the developer of a significant mixed-use residential and commercial block in Boston's South End still owes it more than $10 million, saying delays due to the pandemic and a change in the type of cabinetry in the apartments contributed to higher costs.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At New IRS Rules For Domestically Controlled REITs

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    The Internal Revenue Services' finalized Treasury Regulations addressing whether real estate investment trusts qualify as domestically controlled adopt the basic structure of previous proposals, but certain new and modified rules may mitigate the regulations' impact, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • How New Rule Would Change CFIUS Enforcement Powers

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    Before the May 15 comment deadline, companies may want to weigh in on proposed regulatory changes to enforcement and mitigation tools at the disposal of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, including broadened subpoena powers, difficult new mitigation timelines and higher maximum penalties, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • 2nd Circ. Eminent Domain Ruling Empowers Municipalities

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Brinkmann v. Town of Southold, finding that a pretextual taking does not violate the Fifth Amendment's takings clause, gives municipalities a powerful tool with which to block unwanted development projects, even in bad faith, say James O'Connor and Benjamin Sugarman at Phillips Lytle.

  • SEC Should Be Allowed To Equip Investors With Climate Info

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new rule to require more climate-related disclosures will provide investors with much-needed clarity, despite opponents' attempts to challenge the rule with misused legal arguments, say Sarah Goetz at Democracy Forward and Cynthia Hanawalt at Columbia University’s Sabin Center for Climate Change.

  • How EB-5 Regional Centers Can Prepare For USCIS Audits

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    In response to the recently announced U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services guidelines that require EB-5 regional center audits every five years to verify their compliance with immigration and securities laws, regional centers should take steps to facilitate a seamless audit process, say Jennifer Hermansky and Miriam Thompson at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Understanding The IRC's Excessive Refund Claim Penalty

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    Taxpayers considering protective refund claims pending resolution of major questions in tax cases like Moore v. U.S., which is pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, should understand how doing so may also leave them vulnerable to an excessive refund claim penalty under Internal Revenue Code Section 6676, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Bankruptcy Ruling Shifts Lease Rejection Claim Calculation

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in In re: Cortlandt provides guidance on how to calculate a landlord's damages claim when a bankruptcy debtor rejects a lease, changing from an approach that considers the remaining rent due under the lease to one that considers the remaining time, say Bethany Simmons and Noah Weingarten at Loeb & Loeb.

  • Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • What Calif. Eviction Ruling Means For Defaulting Borrowers

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    A California appellate court's recent decision in Homeward Opportunities v. Taptelis found that a defaulting borrower could not delay foreclosure with an improperly served notice of pendency of action, but leaves open a possibility for borrowers to delay eviction proceedings merely by filing lawsuits, say Anne Beehler and Krystal Anderson at Holland & Knight.

  • How 3D Printing And Prefab Are Changing Construction

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    The growing popularity of trends like 3D printing technology and prefabrication in the construction industry have positive ramifications ranging from reducing risks at project sites to streamlining construction schedules, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • A Deep Dive Into High Court's Permit Fee Ruling

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    David Robinson and Daniel Golub at Holland & Knight explore the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling that a local traffic impact fee charged to a California property owner may be a Fifth Amendment taking — and where it leaves localities and real estate developers.

  • Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.