Real Estate

  • May 02, 2024

    DLA Piper Investment Funds Leader Joins Willkie In Chicago

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP has announced that the former co-head of DLA Piper's investment funds practice joined the firm's asset management group as a partner in its Chicago office. 

  • May 02, 2024

    Eckert Seamans Sues For Inclusive Zoning Fight Fees

    Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott says a group representing Pittsburgh-area developers still owes nearly $76,000 in legal fees for the firm's work on a federal suit challenging an "inclusive zoning" ordinance, according to a complaint filed in Pennsylvania state court Thursday.

  • May 02, 2024

    Nixon Peabody Adds Two Community Finance Attys In DC

    Nixon Peabody LLP has hired two partners, who will focus their practices on helping nonprofits and other clients understand and obtain tax credits for a range of community development projects, to its community development finance practice in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Thursday.

  • May 02, 2024

    New DC Stadium A Step Closer With RFK Demolition Approved

    RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., has been cleared for demolition by the National Park Service, another step forward in the city's attempt to build a new stadium to lure back the NFL's Washington Commanders.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-State Dept. Adviser To Co-Lead Klasko's Investor Visa Team

    A former U.S. Department of State attorney-adviser has left government service to co-lead Klasko Immigration Law Partners' EB-5 regional center and developer practice, the firm recently announced.

  • May 01, 2024

    Judges Say Homeowners' Fight Over Airport Not Grounded Yet

    A Washington couple violated their homeowners' association covenants by running a wing-walking flight school out of their home, but it is unclear if they ran afoul of community rules by using an association-owned airstrip for their business, according to a state appeals court opinion reversing a restriction on the couple's use of the airstrip.

  • May 01, 2024

    T-Mobile Gets Tax Reimbursement Suit Tossed For Good

    T-Mobile has convinced a New Jersey federal court to toss for good a suit brought by a middleman seeking to collect tax reimbursements the mobile behemoth had supposedly promised a landlord after it didn't fix the deficiencies in its suit the third go round.

  • May 01, 2024

    Colo. House OKs Tax Credits For Middle-Income Housing

    The Colorado House approved a pilot program Wednesday to provide a tax credit to developers of housing aimed at middle-income residents

  • May 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Scrutinizes Social Welfare In Tribe's Land Trust Bid

    The D.C. Circuit on Wednesday grappled with whether a Native American tribe's bid to compel the federal government to take land into trust for a casino venture would promote tribe members' social welfare, as one judge sounded wary of such a move's repercussions.

  • May 01, 2024

    More Withdraw From Conn. Atty Hacked Payment Lawsuits

    A series of withdrawals has cut into a voluminous pile of lawsuits surrounding a real estate attorney's wiring of money to the wrong people in connection with several real estate sales, with First American Title among the parties that filed recent withdrawal notices in the myriad matters.

  • May 01, 2024

    NJ Atty Fights 'Hare-Brained' Malpractice Claims In RE Dispute

    A suspended New Jersey attorney is seeking summary judgment and sanctions for a "hare-brained" attempt by Chaitman LLP to mount a third-party complaint holding him liable for allegedly providing bad legal advice that prompted a malpractice case between Chaitman and former clients.

  • May 01, 2024

    DLA Piper Adds Ex-Sidley Atty To New Funds Team

    DLA Piper on Tuesday announced another addition to its newly formed stand-alone investment funds group, this time a former Sidley Austin LLP partner focused on advising private funds sponsors.

  • May 01, 2024

    Tax Credit Transfer Regs Show IRS Caution In Rulemaking

    The IRS and Treasury's final rules on the sale and transfer of green energy credits maintained a strict reading of the statute while making few changes, a sign of caution by regulators amid judicial scrutiny of the government's rulemaking authority.

  • April 30, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Commerzbank RMBS Suit Against US Bank

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived part of a nearly decade-old Commerzbank AG lawsuit brought against U.S. Bank NA over its role as a trustee on a slew of pre-2008 crisis RMBS trusts, sending some of the German bank's previously dismissed claims back to district court for a "closer inspection."

  • April 30, 2024

    Feds Say Treaties Don't Protect Utah Tribe In Land Row

    Efforts by a Utah tribe to restore public lands to a trust status that would prevent federal officials from illegally accessing the property are based on a false premise, the United States said, arguing that two 19th century laws support its bid to dismiss the case.

  • April 30, 2024

    Attys Barred From Practicing Over Ch. 13 Real Estate Scams

    Enforcement actions against two consumer bankruptcy attorneys who admitted they hid their involvement in schemes to acquire their clients' homes during Chapter 13 proceedings have resulted in sanctions barring them from practicing in certain districts, the U.S. Department of Justice's Trustee Program announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    PolyMet Must Give Up More Info In Mining Land Swap Suit

    A federal judge has declined to sanction a Minnesota mining company in a discovery challenge by the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa but ordered it to produce certain previously withheld information in the tribe's bid to undo a land swap for copper and nickel mining.

  • April 30, 2024

    Minn. Tribes Seek Support For Five 'Land Return' Bills

    More than 20 Minnesota-based groups have urged state lawmakers to vote in favor of five "land return" bills that would give back state-owned lands to Native American tribes, saying the measures support the legal return of Indigenous lands along with their continued use by the public.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Enforcers Back CoStar At 9th Circ. Against Antitrust Claims

    Several former antitrust enforcers told the Ninth Circuit that a lower court was right to toss a rival's claims that CoStar monopolizes commercial real estate information markets despite concerns from the Federal Trade Commission about the allegations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Co. Settles Data Breach Claims

    A mortgage company settled a consolidated data breach class action that accused the company in Connecticut federal court of being liable for a November 2023 data breach that compromised its customers' personal information.

  • April 30, 2024

    NY Bank Investors Spar Over Bid To Merge, Pause Suits

    New York Community Bancorp Inc. shareholders traded barbs in filings this week over whether a New York federal judge should allow an individual shareholder to intervene in the larger group's attempt to consolidate and stay their derivative shareholder suits against the bank.

  • April 30, 2024

    5th Circ. Backs La. Enviro Dept. In Gas Facility Permit Dispute

    A Fifth Circuit panel upheld the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality's permitting decision for a liquefied natural gas export facility, rejecting concerns raised by the Sierra Club that the facility's emissions will surpass national ambient air quality standards.

  • April 30, 2024

    Hospital Says IP Spat Shouldn't Delay Children's Center Build

    A Michigan hospital system has asked a judge to deny an attempt to block construction of a children's rehabilitation hospital, saying it did not copy its former architect's design and has made significant design pivots since terminating the firm's contract.

  • April 30, 2024

    Mich. Judge Admits Error In Cutting Predatory Lending Claims

    A Michigan federal judge admitted she was wrong to toss fair housing claims alleging a group of real estate companies ran a bulk home buying program that preyed on Black buyers, reviving the claims and reversing a decision to cut a defendant from the case.

  • April 30, 2024

    Goodwin Private Funds Partner Joins Fried Frank In NY

    Fried Frank has announced it hired a New York-based asset management attorney who spent more than a decade at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP and was most recently a partner at Goodwin Procter LLP.

Expert Analysis

  • Reducing Carbon Footprint Requires A Tricky Path For CRE

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    As real estate owners find themselves caught between rapidly evolving environmental, social and governance initiatives and complicated societal debate, they will need to carefully establish formal plans to remain both competitive and compliant, say Michael Kuhn and Mahira Khan at Jackson Walker.

  • New CMS Rule Will Change Nursing Facility Disclosures

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    A new rule from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services significantly expands disclosure requirements for nursing facilities backed by private equity companies or real estate investment trusts, likely foreshadowing increased oversight that could include more targeted audits, say Janice Davis and Christopher Ronne at Morgan Lewis.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • What Shareholder Approval Rule Changes Mean For Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved proposed rule changes to shareholder requirements by the New York Stock Exchange, an approval that will benefit listed companies in many ways, including by making it easier to raise capital from passive investors, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Zimbabwe Ruling Bolsters UK's Draw As Arbitration Enforcer

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    An English court's recent decision in Border Timbers v. Zimbabwe, finding that state immunity was irrelevant to registering an arbitration award, emphasizes the U.K.'s reputation as a creditor-friendly destination for award enforcement, say Jon Felce and Tulsi Bhatia at Cooke Young.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

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    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

  • Opinion

    White Collar Plea Deals Are Rarely 'Knowing' And 'Voluntary'

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    Because prosecutors are not required to disclose exculpatory evidence during plea negotiations, white collar defendants often enter into plea deals that don’t meet the U.S. Supreme Court’s “knowing” and “voluntary” standard for trials — but individual courts and solutions judges could rectify the issue, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • How 2 CFPB Advisory Opinions Affect Reporting Agencies

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two advisory opinions last month that demonstrate a continued commitment to address inaccuracies in background check reports and consumer file disclosures through broad interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, expanding on a coordinated federal agency effort, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Algorithmic Pricing Programs Caught In Antitrust Crosshairs

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    The Justice Department's investigation into software company RealPage follows a host of federal antitrust cases alleging that property owners and casino hotel operators use the same proprietary software programs to fix and maintain pricing, which means algorithmic pricing programs are considered a key price-fixing tool in the digital age, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • A Welcome Turning Of The Page For Residential Real Estate

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    After one of the most challenging years on record for residential real estate, 2024 will likely be a time of transition to a stabler business climate, as sellers lose some of their excess bargaining power and the pace of sales picks up, says Marty Green at Polunsky Beitel.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

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