Federal

  • April 10, 2024

    Plastic Surgeon Owes $7.7M From Offshore Scheme, US Says

    A now-retired plastic surgeon owes the Internal Revenue Service more than $7.7 million after he ran an offshore employee leasing scheme and he and his wife transferred nearly all their assets to their then-11-year-old daughter, who is now a lawyer, the government told an Ohio federal court.

  • April 10, 2024

    8th Circ. Skeptical Of Bid To Reveal IRS Fraud Detection Docs

    Eighth Circuit judges seemed skeptical Wednesday of a retired Harvard law professor's efforts to force the IRS to reveal its techniques for questioning fraud suspects, as two of three judges on a panel highlighted the potential to prevent identity theft by keeping the techniques hidden.

  • April 10, 2024

    Pension Plan Segment Rates Increase In April

    Segment rates for calculating pension plan funding rose in April, the Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday. 

  • April 10, 2024

    Family's $25M Settlement Is Income, Tax Court Says

    A $25 million settlement received by a family was not tied to personal injury damages, making it taxable, the U.S. Tax Court ruled Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    Fla. Atty Gets 8 Years For Fraudulent Tax Shelter Scheme

    A Florida attorney was sentenced Wednesday to eight years in prison after pleading guilty in federal court to tax evasion and defrauding the U.S. government through a tax shelter scheme he pitched to clients that involved making purported charitable contributions so his clients could claim millions of dollars in tax deductions they weren't qualified to receive.

  • April 10, 2024

    IRS' DOJ Referral Rules 'A Disaster,' Sen. Whitehouse Says

    The IRS protocols for referring cases to the U.S. Department of Justice are "a disaster" for enforcing laws against bankers and other actors who help U.S. taxpayers evade taxes, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse said Wednesday during a hearing on offshore tax evasion before the Senate Budget Committee.

  • April 10, 2024

    Feds Cleared To Use Undercover Recording In Atty's Tax Trial

    Federal prosecutors trying an attorney next week on charges he orchestrated a tax fraud scheme that spanned seven states will be allowed to play for the jury an audio recording made by an undercover agent, a North Carolina federal judge ruled.

  • April 10, 2024

    IRS Floats Alternative For Hydrogen Credit Emissions Value

    The Internal Revenue Service released guidance Wednesday that would allow hydrogen producers to pursue another method to value their emissions output — which is critical in qualifying for the clean hydrogen production tax credit — if they can't get the information using the Argonne National Laboratory model.

  • April 10, 2024

    Senate Finance Panel Schedules Hearing On IRS Budget

    The Senate Finance Committee will convene next week to discuss the Internal Revenue Service's budget for 2025, the committee said Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    IRS Fixes Heading For Apprenticeship Credits, Deductions

    The Internal Revenue Service issued a correction notice Wednesday to fix a heading related to increased tax relief for meeting certain wage and apprenticeship requirements.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Trump Finance Chief Weisselberg Jailed For Perjury

    A New York state judge on Wednesday sentenced former Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg to five months in jail for lying under oath in the attorney general's civil fraud case against Donald Trump and his business associates, imprisoning a close ally of the former president on the eve of his hush-money trial.

  • April 09, 2024

    Treasury Proposes Long-Awaited Stock Buyback Tax Rules

    The U.S. Treasury Department proposed a pair of long-awaited rules Tuesday that detail the calculation and reporting of a new excise tax assessed to publicly traded corporations that recently bought back their own shares of stock on the open market.

  • April 09, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Can't Sue Ex-Exec For Causing Canada Tax Hit

    A Colorado federal judge shot down a pharmacy automation company's suit alleging its former chief commercial officer cost it nearly CA$1.2 million ($907,000) in Canadian taxes by not telling his employer he had moved out of the country, saying the company hasn't shown it suffered any damage as a result.

  • April 09, 2024

    10th Circ. Won't Allow Church To Skirt IRS Summons

    The Tenth Circuit rejected a Kansas church's request to quash an Internal Revenue Service's third-party summons into the organization's bank records because the church does not hold the financial information and therefore is not subject to church tax inquiry restrictions, according to an opinion released Tuesday.

  • April 09, 2024

    Man's Unusual Filing Methods Led To Liability, 4th Circ. Told

    The Fourth Circuit should uphold a U.S. Tax Court decision allowing the IRS to collect the tax liability of a technology consultant who for years used unusual filing methods, the government argued Tuesday, saying the court correctly noted he contributed to any confusion over his bill.

  • April 09, 2024

    Tax Court Rejects Pa. Man's Worked-For-Free Claim

    A Pennsylvania man who claimed he worked for free is liable to pay more than $15,000 in unpaid income taxes, according to a ruling transcript published Tuesday by the U.S. Tax Court.

  • April 09, 2024

    Fund Managers Want Ga. Attys' Tax Shelter Fraud Suit Tossed

    A fund manager accused of misleading investors into an illegal tax shelter want a Georgia federal court to throw out the proposed class action against them, claiming the facts alleged in an updated complaint still aren't specific enough for court.

  • April 08, 2024

    Tax Court Upholds $11M In Foreign Reporting Penalties

    The U.S. Tax Court on Monday mostly upheld $11 million in foreign reporting penalties against a man who admitted he hid money overseas, but the court declined to overturn its ruling that the IRS lacks authority to assess certain foreign reporting penalties.

  • April 08, 2024

    Tax Court OKs Accuracy Penalties After 11th Circ. Reversal

    A Florida man found to owe more than $9 million in taxes is liable to pay accuracy-related penalties, the U.S. Tax Court ruled Monday, after the Eleventh Circuit reversed a previous decision shielding him from the fines.

  • April 08, 2024

    CPAs Want Treasury To Delay Beneficial Ownership Registry

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury should delay enforcement of beneficial ownership information reporting requirements while courts hear cases challenging the Corporate Transparency Act, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and 54 state CPA societies said.

  • April 08, 2024

    IRS Aptly Denied Man's Payment Proposal, Tax Court Says

    The U.S. Tax Court sided with the Internal Revenue Service on Monday in finding there had been no abuse of discretion when the agency rejected a "partial pay" installment agreement from a Pennsylvania man.

  • April 08, 2024

    Tax Court Declines To Stop Clock For Woman's Petition

    A Virginia woman who failed to timely dispute a collection action could not prove she was entitled to equitable tolling, the U.S. Tax Court ruled Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-IRS Criminal Investigations Head Joins Crypto Data Firm

    A newly retired chief of the Internal Revenue Service's law enforcement arm is taking his skills to blockchain analytics firm Chainalysis, where he'll help federal agencies and crypto firms leverage Chainalysis' data and solutions to combat financial crime.

  • April 08, 2024

    FTC Defends In-House Judges' Role In H&R Block Case

    H&R Block wrongly claimed that the Federal Trade Commission's administrative law judges should be disqualified from overseeing an administrative proceeding accusing the tax preparation company of deceptive advertising, FTC lawyers told the agency, arguing the judges don't have illegal job protections.

  • April 08, 2024

    Mo. Atty Loses Last-Ditch Bid To Dodge NC Tax Fraud Trial

    A St. Louis attorney lost a last-minute attempt to escape his upcoming tax fraud trial based on claims that the prosecution was never properly authorized, with a North Carolina federal judge finding that the government did mislead the court but nonetheless had the right stamp of approval.

Expert Analysis

  • A Proposal For Fairer, More Efficient Innocent Spouse Relief

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    Adding a simple election to the current regulatory framework for innocent spouse claims would benefit both taxpayers and the Internal Revenue Service by alleviating the undue burdens placed on those the program was intended to help and improving agency collections in such cases, says Laurie Kazenoff at Kazenoff Tax.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Proposed Hydrogen Tax Credit Regs May Be Legally Flawed

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    While the recently proposed regulations for the new clean hydrogen production tax credit have been lauded by some in the environmental community, it is unclear whether they are sufficiently grounded in law, result from valid rulemaking processes, or accord with other administrative law principles, say Hunter Johnston and Steven Dixon at Steptoe.

  • Navigating ACA Reporting Nuances As Deadlines Loom

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    Stephanie Lowe at Liebert Cassidy walks employers through need-to-know elements of Affordable Care Act reporting, including two quickly approaching deadlines, the updated affordability threshold, strategies for choosing an affordability safe harbor, and common coding pitfalls.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Why Biz Groups Disagree On Ending Chevron Deference

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    Two amicus briefs filed in advance of last month's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo highlight contrasting views on whether the doctrine of Chevron deference promotes or undermines the stable regulatory environment that businesses require, say Wyatt Kendall and Sydney Brogden at Morris Manning.

  • US-Chile Tax Treaty May Encourage Cross-Border Investment

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    Provisions in the recently effective U.S.-Chile bilateral income tax treaty should encourage business between the two countries, as they reduce U.S. withholding tax on investment income for Chilean taxpayers, exempt certain U.S. taxpayers from Chilean capital gains tax, and clarify U.S. foreign tax credit rules, say attorneys at Kramer Levin.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Planning A Defense As IRS Kicks Off Sports Losses Campaign

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    Sports team owners and partnerships face potential examination under the Internal Revenue Service’s recently announced sports industry losses campaign, and should be preparing to explain what drove their reported losses and assembling documentation to support their tax return positions and accounting methods, say Sheri Dillon and Jennifer Breen at Morgan Lewis.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

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