Trials

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Of 12 Picked For Trump Hush Money Case In NY

    A jury of 12 New Yorkers was selected Thursday for the hush money trial of former President Donald Trump on charges he falsified business records to keep news of an extramarital affair from damaging his 2016 electoral prospects.

  • April 17, 2024

    Trial-Ready Paraquat MDL Cases Tossed After Testimony Axed

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday threw out the first group of trial-ready cases over the herbicide paraquat, agreeing with Syngenta and Chevron that the plaintiffs' expert testimony must be excluded and finding that the cases fail without that testimony.

  • April 17, 2024

    'It Has To End': Justices Mull Finality In 32-Year Murder Saga

    In its second review of drug-fueled, baseball bat killings during the presidency of George H.W. Bush, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday pondered steering an Arizona man's capital punishment challenge toward conclusion, perhaps by handling evidentiary tasks normally left to lower courts.

  • April 17, 2024

    UC Berkeley Law Dean Vouches For Dunn At Disciplinary Trial

    University of California, Berkeley School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky testified as a character witness Wednesday in attorney Joseph Dunn's disciplinary trial, saying he holds the ousted California State Bar executive director in the highest regard, and his opinion is unlikely to change whatever the trial's outcome.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Judge Told Of College Hoopsters' Hotel Curfew Guard

    A Stanford University runner testified on Wednesday for the National Labor Relations Board that some student-athletes should be considered employees due to the control programs exert over them, and that a time he encountered a hotel curfew guard for a Division I basketball team highlights how tight that control can be.

  • April 17, 2024

    'I Am Mad': Client Regrets Trusting Atty Accused Of Tax Fraud

    Emotions ran high Wednesday in a North Carolina federal courtroom as former clients unwittingly roped into an alleged tax fraud scheme took the stand, one of whom was openly exasperated at learning he'd been misled by the two attorneys and an insurance agent who are on trial.

  • April 17, 2024

    Discovery Sanction Too Severe In $1M Vape Case, Panel Says

    An Illinois appeals court has found that a default judgment granted against a vape shop accused of causing a customer's burn injuries, which led to a $1 million bench verdict, was too severe of a sanction for defense counsel's failure to timely comply with certain discovery requests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Sentencing Commission Limits Acquitted Conduct Sentencing

    The U.S. Sentencing Commission on Wednesday voted to restrict the controversial practice of considering acquitted conduct in federal sentencing, and floated the possibility of applying the change retroactively.

  • April 17, 2024

    Menendez Trial Date In Limbo Over Pact On Atty's Testimony

    A co-defendant's reticence has stalled an agreement on the scope of a Gibbons PC attorney's testimony in the bribery case of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and two New Jersey businessmen, leaving the much-litigated trial date of May 6 in limbo.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ga. Jury Finds Supplier At Fault For Botched Herbicide Job

    An Atlanta federal jury on Wednesday found a company hired to thin out woods on a rural Georgia property and a subcontractor brought in to spray the property with herbicide were responsible for wrecking a developer's plans for turning the location into a quail hunting retreat. 

  • April 17, 2024

    J&J Tells Jurors To Look To Evidence And Science In Talc Trial

    Johnson & Johnson's attorney urged a Florida jury Wednesday to look beyond the emotion in the case of a longtime baby powder user who died from cancer and to the science and the evidence, which he said fail to show a causal link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer.

  • April 17, 2024

    Wells Fargo Headed To Trial In Ex-Exec's COVID-Era ADA Suit

    Wells Fargo is headed to trial over a former investment director's Americans with Disabilities Act claim in a suit alleging he lost his job following an accommodation request after his employer prepared to mandate a return to office, with a North Carolina federal judge also trimming the former employee's age discrimination suit.

  • April 17, 2024

    Jury To Decide Fault Of Driver In Spray-Huffing DUI Death

    A Minnesota federal judge on Wednesday said it's up to a jury to decide whether a driver acted intentionally or negligently when he allegedly huffed a compressed gas spray and killed a woman in a collision, in a trial against the spray's manufacturer over the death.

  • April 17, 2024

    Judge Won't Toss Any Expert In Under Armour Securities Suit

    The opposing parties in a suit related to Under Armour Inc.'s allegedly inflated stock prices can keep their expert witnesses, a Maryland federal judge ruled Tuesday, saying he was mostly unswayed by the arguments from both sides.

  • April 17, 2024

    3rd Circ. Erases $10M Judgment In Car Charities' TM Dispute

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday erased a $10 million judgment awarded to a charity that sells donated cars for children's education, saying a lower court made a series of errors in concluding that unreasonable delays did not bar claims from Texas-based America Can Cars for Kids in a trademark dispute with a similar charity.

  • April 17, 2024

    2nd Circ. Doubts Adidas Appeal In Thom Browne TM Case

    A Second Circuit panel on Wednesday appeared skeptical of Adidas' arguments that a Manhattan district judge gave improper instructions to a jury that shot down its trademark infringement claims against fashion brand Thom Browne, suggesting the lower court had laid out the issues fairly.

  • April 17, 2024

    Pennsylvania Hospital Cuts $32.5M Birth Injury Deal Midtrial

    Partway through a trial over an infant's brain damage allegedly caused by medical malpractice, a Pennsylvania hospital has agreed to settle the matter for $32.5 million, according to attorneys pursuing the claims on behalf of the child's mother in state court.

  • April 17, 2024

    Texas Jury Hits Samsung With $142M Loss In IP Retrial

    A Texas federal jury on Wednesday said Samsung owes G+ Communications LLC $142 million for infringing two 5G wireless network patents, a huge win on retrial for G+, which was originally awarded less than half of that.

  • April 17, 2024

    Trader's Alleged $110M Mango Markets Fraud In Jury's Hands

    A Manhattan federal jury weighed charges Wednesday against a cryptocurrency trader accused of illegally squeezing $110 million out of Mango Markets by inflating the finance platform's tokens, then borrowing against them, allegedly taking "supply and demand into his own hands."

  • April 17, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Wielded 'Financial Ruin' At Jobsite, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a federal jury Wednesday that ex-Philadelphia labor leader John Dougherty threatened a jobsite manager with "financial ruin" if the man refused to pay his nephew, Gregory Fiocca, despite spotty attendance during the construction of the Live! Casino.

  • April 17, 2024

    Jury Says Caterpillar's Interference Cost Equipment Co. $100M

    A jury in Delaware has rejected antitrust claims against Caterpillar but found that the equipment maker caused a defunct importer $100 million in damages by interfering with its contract to sell equipment through an online sales platform.

  • April 17, 2024

    Rebut Or Regret? Baldwin Faces Quandary In 'Rust' Trial

    The stiff prison sentence handed to the "Rust" film armorer convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer offers potential lessons for actor-producer Alec Baldwin, who experts say must walk a fine line between denying fault and expressing sympathy over his involvement in the tragic incident as he faces trial on the same charge.

  • April 17, 2024

    Compass Group Gets New Damages Trial In $8M Death Suit

    A California state appeals court has rejected cross-appeals from food service giant Compass Group USA Inc. and a mother suing it for negligence in a wrongful death suit that ended in an $8 million verdict, sending the case back for a new trial on damages.

  • April 17, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Appeal May Cite Unusual Preview Testimony

    Sam Bankman-Fried's appeal of his conviction and 25-year prison sentence may cite a "rather unprecedented" trial procedure in which the FTX founder gave provisional testimony before officially taking the witness stand last year, one of his attorneys said Wednesday.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Exec's Contempt Plea Rejected By Judge

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Wednesday rejected a former pharmaceutical executive's agreement to plead guilty to contempt for using an alias to get around a consent judgment in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission fraud case, saying both the former executive and the government knew he'd view the sentence as too low.

Expert Analysis

  • How A Motion Before Justices May Help Trump Beyond Court

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    Even if Donald Trump loses his presidential immunity claim before the U.S. Supreme Court, the delay created by the motion may mean a trial can't be completed before the November election, says Paul Tuchmann at Wiggin and Dana.

  • Opinion

    $175M Bond Refiled By Trump Is Still Substantively Flawed

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    The corrected $175 million bond posted by former President Donald Trump on Thursday to stave off enforcement of the New York attorney general's fraud judgment against him remains substantively and procedurally flawed, as well as inadequately secured, says Adam Pollock of Pollock Cohen.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Perspectives

    Context Is Everything In Justices' Sentencing Relief Decision

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    In the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Pulsifer v. U.S. decision, limiting the number of drug offenders eligible for sentencing relief, the majority and dissent adopted very different contextual frames for interpreting the meaning of “and” — with the practical impact being that thousands more defendants will be subject to severe mandatory minimums, says Douglas Berman at Moritz College of Law​​​​​​​.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • 2nd Circ. Adviser Liability Ruling May Shape SEC Enforcement

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Rashid, applying basic negligence principles to reverse a finding of investment adviser liability, provides a road map for future fraud enforcement proceedings, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley Arant.

  • In Bribery Case, High Court's Past Is Probably Prologue

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Snyder v. U.S. on the issue of whether federal law criminalizes gratuities that are not tied to an explicit quid pro quo, and precedent strongly indicates the court will limit an expansive reading of the bribery statute, say attorneys Sami Azhari and Don Davidson.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

  • Opinion

    DOJ Press Office Is Not Fulfilling Its Stated Mission

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    The U.S. Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs’ apparent practice of issuing press releases when someone is indicted or convicted, but not when a defendant prevails, undermines its stated mission to disseminate “current, complete and accurate” information, and has negative real-world ramifications, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Securing A Common Understanding Of Language Used At Trial

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    Witness examinations in the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump illustrate the importance of building a common understanding of words and phrases and examples as a fact-finding tool at trial, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

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