Trials

  • April 09, 2024

    Feds Want To Push Back Complex Camp Lejeune Cases

    The federal government has asked the North Carolina court overseeing litigation concerning contaminated water at Camp Lejeune to first try cases brought by former residents of the Marine base who allege they have developed only one disease from the water and try more complicated cases later.

  • April 09, 2024

    Trump Loses 2nd Appellate Bid To Pause NY Criminal Trial

    A New York state appellate judge refused Tuesday to delay Donald Trump's upcoming criminal hush-money trial while the former president challenges a gag order, just one day after a different appeals judge declined to halt the trial due to supposed jury pool bias.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Says Boss's Invoice Ask Caused Concern

    A former Autonomy finance employee took the stand Monday in the criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch and finance director Stephen Chamberlain, telling a California federal jury that he was "not comfortable" with one of Chamberlain's invoice requests and was sacked after raising concerns about accounting irregularities.

  • April 08, 2024

    Feds Tell Justices Trump's Immunity Bid Would Upset Framers

    Former President Donald Trump's claim to absolute presidential immunity from criminal charges related to official acts contradicts the text and intent of the U.S. Constitution and would've been "anathema" to the document's framers, special counsel John L. "Jack" Smith told the U.S. Supreme Court late Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    NRA, LaPierre, Execs Seek To Ax $6M Misconduct Verdict

    The National Rifle Association, its longtime CEO Wayne LaPierre and two other executives asked a New York judge to throw out a Manhattan jury's verdict that they improperly used donor money, among other misconduct, and owe the gun rights group a total of $6.4 million.

  • April 08, 2024

    SEC 'Shadow Trading' Victory Could Bring DOJ Knocking

    Now that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has convinced a jury that a pharmaceutical executive committed insider trading by purchasing a competitor's stock in a practice often referred to as "shadow trading," attorneys say federal prosecutors might be tempted to dip their toe into the waters of the previously untested legal theory.

  • April 08, 2024

    Las Vegas Atty Killed In Murder-Suicide During Law Firm Depo

    An attorney is suspected of fatally shooting prominent Las Vegas personal injury trial lawyer Dennis Prince and Prince's wife before killing himself in a targeted shooting during a deposition in a child custody battle at the Prince Law Group's offices Monday morning, according to the Las Vegas Police and media reports.

  • April 08, 2024

    Hytera's IMs With Chinese Court Don't Sway Judge

    An Illinois federal judge told Hytera Communications on Monday it still had not done enough to be free of serious sanctions for continuing a Chinese intellectual property suit against her orders, saying recent instant messages between Hytera and the Chinese court were not proof the case was officially over.

  • April 08, 2024

    Jury Finds Patent Claims Invalid In Suit Against Nokia

    Lawyers for a Texas patent litigation outfit have convinced jurors in Marshall, Texas, that Nokia infringed one of three telecom patents that were issued nearly two decades ago to a now-bankrupt Israeli tech company, but were stuck with a verdict that found claims in that patent as well as another are invalid.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ga. Puts New Citizens In Voting 'Purgatory,' Judge Told

    For the second time this year, lawyers for the Georgia Secretary of State's office began a federal bench trial Monday by defending the state against allegations that key election protocols serve to disenfranchise voters, this time brought by advocacy groups who say the state is shutting newly minted citizens out of the democratic process.

  • April 08, 2024

    Tesla Settles Autopilot Wrongful Death Suit On Eve Of Trial

    On the day a closely watched trial was set to get underway in California, Tesla Inc. revealed it reached a confidential settlement with the family of an Apple engineer who died in a 2018 crash of a Tesla vehicle engaged in Autopilot, the company said in a California Superior Court filing on Monday, asking the judge to seal the figure.

  • April 09, 2024

    CORRECTED: Ex-SDNY Clerk, Atty Get Prison For Referral Scheme

    A former court clerk in the Southern District of New York was sentenced to two years in prison Monday and a disbarred defense attorney was hit with a year-long term for an alleged cash-for-referrals scheme.

  • April 08, 2024

    Mo. Atty Loses Last-Ditch Bid To Dodge NC Tax Fraud Trial

    A St. Louis attorney lost a last-minute attempt to escape his upcoming tax fraud trial based on claims that the prosecution was never properly authorized, with a North Carolina federal judge finding that the government did mislead the court but nonetheless had the right stamp of approval.

  • April 08, 2024

    Menendez Seeks To Block Info On Lifestyle, Political Donors

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez is seeking to have evidence about his and his wife's lifestyle and spending habits and information about his campaign donors excluded from the bribery trial that the couple and two business associates are facing on May 6, according to court documents.

  • April 08, 2024

    Trump Can't Move Hush Money Trial, NY Appeals Judge Says

    A New York appellate judge on Monday denied Donald Trump's request to halt his upcoming hush money trial due to what the former president cast as a hopelessly biased jury pool in Manhattan, as he awaited a hearing on his separate bid to lift a gag order.

  • April 08, 2024

    Royal Caribbean Settles Passenger's Suit Over Wife's Death

    Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. and the husband of a passenger who died of congestive heart failure while on a Mediterranean cruise opted Friday to settle their dispute over whether the cruise company had provided adequate medical care, avoiding a trial set to start Monday.

  • April 05, 2024

    Bayer Verdict In Mo. Roundup Cases Reduced To $611M

    A Missouri state judge has significantly reduced the $1.56 billion jury verdict awarded to three people who claimed their cancer was caused by Bayer unit Monsanto Co.'s Roundup weedkiller, cutting the damages awarded to just $611 million.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Justices Reinstate Defense Verdict In Store Fall Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed a lower appellate court's decision to reinstate a slip-and-fall suit against an Albertsons LLC grocery store, saying that although certain instructions may have been erroneously given to the jury, the effect was harmless and not unfair.

  • April 07, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Save Hytera From 'Self-Inflicted' Wounds

    A Seventh Circuit panel this weekend said Hytera Communications could not be trusted after it filed a Chinese lawsuit behind an Illinois court's back and brought a $1 million daily fine upon itself, as a federal judge said she needed written proof that a Chinese court had really dismissed the suit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Meta Looks To Nix FTC's Antitrust Case Over Acquisitions

    Meta Platforms urged a D.C. federal court on Friday to toss the Federal Trade Commission's antitrust case against it, saying the agency has found no evidence showing its acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp hurt competition or consumers.

  • April 05, 2024

    Abbott Settles TM Suit Over Gray Market Diabetes Test Strips

    Abbott Laboratories told a New York federal judge Friday that the company has settled what remains of its trademark litigation campaign against makers of gray market diabetes test strips that has been going on since 2015.

  • April 05, 2024

    Microsoft, Others Can Weigh In On Epic, Apple App Store Row

    A California federal judge allowed Microsoft, X Corp., Meta Platforms, Spotify and other major app developers to file amicus briefs in Epic Games' effort to convince the court that Apple is not complying with an order barring it from using anti-steering rules in its App Store.

  • April 05, 2024

    Jury Finds Pharma Exec 'Shadow Traded' With Inside Info

    A California federal jury found Friday that a former Medivation executive is liable for using inside information from his company when he purchased stock in rival pharmaceutical maker Incyte, in a novel civil "shadow trading" case brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • April 05, 2024

    Surgeon Denied Atty Fees After Erasure of $15M Sex Bias Win

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has denied attorney fees after undoing a $15 million verdict won by a surgeon who alleged that Thomas Jefferson University exhibited anti-male bias in investigating a medical resident's sexual assault claims against him, ruling a new trial was necessary.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs' Trial Moved Over Atty Schedule Woes

    A New Jersey federal judge has agreed to reschedule the trial of two former Cognizant Technology Solutions executives accused of authorizing a bribe to an Indian official, answering the call by a Gibbons PC counsel who has another high-profile white-collar trial on his schedule the same day his Cognizant case client was also set to go before a jury.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

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