Washington

  • February 21, 2024

    Crypto Law Firm Invokes Coinbase Petition In SEC Challenge

    Crypto-focused law firm Hodl Law PLLC told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that its standing to sue the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over its crypto policy is undeniable now that the agency has decided not to take up a rulemaking petition from crypto exchange Coinbase.

  • February 21, 2024

    Hospital Debt Collector To Pay $1M To End Wash. AG's Claims

    Debt collector Harris & Harris has agreed to shell out $1 million to resolve allegations that it collected medical debt payments from tens of thousands of Washington state patients without disclosing that they might qualify for financial assistance, according to a consent decree filed in state court on Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Federal Coal Lease Ban Case 'Is Moot'

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday vacated and remanded a district court's ruling that had reinstated a 2016 moratorium on federal coal leasing, with a recommendation that the litigation be dismissed as moot, saying there's no basis to conclude that a challenge to a defunct order is still alive.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Slams DOJ 'About-Face' In Asylum Rule Case

    A split Ninth Circuit panel agreed Wednesday to pause the Biden administration's appeal of a lower court order vacating a rule limiting asylum, as a dissenting judge excoriated the government for trying to settle the case after forcefully defending the rule.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Meta Bid To End Ad Discrimination Suit

    A proposed class action accusing Facebook owner Meta of permitting discrimination in choices regarding which users could see housing ads appears headed for discovery after the U.S. Supreme Court denied the company's petition to appeal a split Ninth Circuit ruling.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms $90M Facebook Privacy Deal Over Objections

    A Ninth Circuit panel affirmed a $90 million class settlement on Wednesday to resolve allegations that Facebook illegally tracked logged-out users' browsing activity, calling two objectors' suggestion that the company faced $1.24 trillion in statutory damages "an unreasonable baseline that would violate due process."

  • February 21, 2024

    CoStar, Hotel Giants Accused Of Data-Driven Price-Fixing

    Hilton, Hyatt and other big name hotel operators are the target of a proposed class action alleging they colluded with hospitality industry analytics firm CoStar Group Inc. to fix prices in luxury hotel markets in Seattle and other major U.S. cities, according to a suit filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Boeing Ousts Head Of Embattled 737 Max Program

    Boeing on Wednesday replaced the chief of its 737 Max program as the American aerospace giant rejiggers the executive team overseeing its most popular line of jets after high-profile safety mishaps such as last month's midair panel blowout and two deadly crashes overseas five years ago.

  • February 20, 2024

    Protego Owes Firewall Vendor More Than $1.2M, Suit Says

    A Washington firm that tried and failed to become one of the first federally chartered cryptocurrency banks was hit with a breach-of-contract suit in Delaware federal court late last week by a cybersecurity contractor claiming the banking company failed to pay it more than $1.2 million.

  • February 20, 2024

    9th Circ. Reinstates Air Traffic Controller's Age Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a suit Tuesday from an air traffic controller who said the Federal Aviation Administration passed him over for promotions because of his age, ruling the agency can't hide behind a carveout that allows it to restrict the positions to younger applicants.

  • February 20, 2024

    Binance, Prosecutors Urge Court To Affirm $4.3B Penalty

    Binance Holdings Ltd. and federal prosecutors have called on a Washington federal court to confirm a historic $4.3 billion penalty, including a $1.8 billion criminal fine and a $2.5 billion forfeiture, that the crypto exchange agreed to pay last fall when admitting to a series of banking and sanctions violations.  

  • February 20, 2024

    No Coverage For Firm In Haiti Malpractice Suit, Insurer Says

    An insurance company has asked a Washington federal court to declare it does not have to cover a Seattle law firm facing a $31 million New York federal malpractice case stemming from its representation of a Haitian agency in a petroleum contract arbitration, arguing the firm breached the insurance agreement by lying on its application.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amazon Agrees To Pay $5.5M To End COVID Screening Suit

    A group of California Amazon warehouse workers asked a federal judge to approve a $5.5 million settlement resolving a proposed collective action accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to pay workers for time they spent undergoing pre-shift COVID-19 screenings, saying it will provide them with all their alleged unpaid wages.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Pass On Bid To Hold UK Co. Liable For Cessna Crash

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear a bid seeking to hold an English aerospace firm liable for a Cessna crash that killed three people, passing on an opportunity to resolve what the petitioners called a circuit split or give credence to a "vociferous dissent" within the Ninth Circuit's published opinion.

  • February 16, 2024

    Atty Convicted Of $5.5M Client Theft Asks 9th Circ. To Vacate

    The prosecution of a former California personal injury attorney sent to jail for 12 years for embezzling as much as $5.5 million in clients' settlement money was riddled with error, and his conviction and sentence should be vacated, his counsel told the Ninth Circuit at a hearing Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Athira Pharma Investors Win OK Of $10M Deal On Second Try

    Over 30,000 Athira Pharma investors have scored preliminary approval of a $10 million settlement over claims its former CEO manipulated studies relating to an Alzheimer's drug, five months after a Washington federal judge rejected their first bid but let them try again to address concerns over conflicts and equitable treatment.

  • February 16, 2024

    Hydro Co. Must Alter, Not Remove, Dam That's Killing Salmon

    A Washington federal judge on Friday said a hydroelectric company must remove part of a rock dam structure killing endangered wild salmon, but the judge declined to order complete removal, saying it went beyond a narrowly tailored remedy zeroing in on what is harming fish.

  • February 16, 2024

    Meet The Attys Arguing Copyright Damages Row At Top Court

    The attorneys who will face off before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday in a copyright dispute that could expand the timeline for available damages are both well-respected appellate litigators who have spent plenty of time in the spotlight of big cases.

  • February 16, 2024

    Swimmers Tell 9th Circ. New League Was Boycotted

    The International Swimming League and swimmers urged the Ninth Circuit on Friday to revive their certified class antitrust claims against the sport's international governing body over its alleged 2018 "boycott" of an ISL event, arguing the lower court erred in finding the organization's actions didn't constitute a boycott.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    $520K Deal Could End ICO Fraud Claims After Earlier $6M Deal

    Companies accused of holding an unregistered offering of digital assets and some of their current and former employees have received an initial nod for a $520,000 deal to end remaining claims in investor litigation after earlier reaching a $6 million partial deal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Boeing's Bid To Duck Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge pressed Boeing on Friday to explain why it should get a "free pass" in a lawsuit over birth defects allegedly caused by factory workers' chemical exposure, questioning the aerospace giant's argument that it didn't have a duty to workers' future children based on foreseeable harm.

  • February 16, 2024

    Barge Co., Insurer End Pollution Cleanup Coverage Fight

    A Washington barge company and its insurer reached an agreement in a dispute over coverage of legal expenses stemming from claims that the company was liable for environmental pollution at an EPA cleanup site, according to a notice filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Nonprofit Owes $250K For Produce, Suit Says

    A Washington state-based produce company alleged in a federal court complaint this week that a nonprofit has failed to pay it $250,000 for shipments of fresh fruit and vegetables despite receiving funds from a state program that helps provide emergency food for people experiencing hunger.

  • February 15, 2024

    Gerber, Others Fight Bid For MDL On Baby Food Heavy Metals

    A group of baby food manufacturers, including Gerber Products Co., The Hain Celestial Group Inc. and Beech-Nut Nutrition Co., is urging the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation not to consolidate suits alleging that heavy metals in their products cause autism spectrum disorder and other conditions, saying there's no benefit to grouping them in an MDL.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Ore. Insurance Ruling Opens Door To Extracontractual Claims

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    The Oregon Supreme Court's recent Moody v. Oregon Community Credit Union decision expanding an insurer's potential liability when adjusting life insurance policies exposes insurers to extracontractual tort liability, and the boundaries of this application will likely be tested through aggressive legal action, says Tessan Wess at GRSM50.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

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